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The NCCDH has launched a 20-month participatory initiative to test ways to develop organizational capacity to advance health equity (project overview). The project is using an international learning circle, working in tandem with three practice sites to learn what frameworks, strategies and organizational conditions are most useful and effective to develop and sustain Canadian public health organizational capacity for health equity action.

As of May 2018, three sites have been selected, each with a focus on a specific public health challenge of interest to multiple programs. The sites represent different organizational models (e.g., health unit, department within health authority) and differing contexts (e.g., rural and urban, and geography/population size served by department). The practice sites will engage in exchange and co-learning among the other sites involved.
 

Learn more about the participating site projects below.

Site name Project description
Interior Health (BC) Implementing a health equity lens in opioid overdose surveillance and reporting

The project aims to support the implementation of a health equity lens in the reporting, monitoring and surveillance practices related to the overdose crisis, guided by the “Equity-integrated PHSR (EI-PHSR) action framework."

Ottawa Public Health (ON) Client and community engagement

OPH will develop a departmental client and community engagement framework and an engagement policy that incorporate a health equity/SDOH perspective.

Provincial Health Services Authority (BC) PHSA Indigenous Cultural Safety (ICS) Strategy: Implementation and Evaluation

This project focuses on the development of a comprehensive plan for implementation and evaluation of the ICS Strategy, which aims to transform PHSA-wide services to be a leading health organization where Indigenous people receive equitable and timely continuity of care, access to quality health services, and feel safe as both clients and employees within the system.

 
Check back to this page for updates on the project, or subscribe to the NCCDH mailing list.

Do you work in public health? Are you responsible for supporting your organization’s work on the social determinants of health and health equity? If you answered yes to both questions:

Join a network of other professionals who are committed to amplifying their public health equity practice.

The Health Equity Collaborative Network is a network of practitioners and researchers who share practices and experience, build relationships for information exchange and support, build capacity, advance knowledge of effectiveness, and share other information related to the social determinants of health and health equity.

The objectives of the Health Equity Collaborative Network are to support public health practice on the social determinants of health and health equity. Specifically, to:

  1. Provide a platform to share learning and experience in supporting organizational commitments;
  2. Increase knowledge and access to research and practice-based evidence;
  3. Enhance the knowledge and skills of members;
  4. Increase connections and collaboration between and among public health practitioners and researchers;
  5. Provide a space for problem-solving and provide opportunities to act together and influence systems change.

Members of the network meet on a quarterly basis via teleconference/webinar and have access to a shared collaborative website on Health Equity Clicks: Community.

Is the Network for me?

Network members:

  • have an explicit responsibility for social determinants of health and health equity at the local, regional, provincial/territorial levels within their organizations;
  • act as a conduit between the network and their own networks by providing ongoing updates and sharing information;
  • participate actively in Network activities (i.e., attend regular meetings, share resources, visit and contribute to the Network’s collaborative webspace).

To join the network please register here.

For more information contact Sume Ndumbe-Eyoh, Knowledge Translation Specialist.

All information on this website is copyrighted by us or other contributors. Users of this website are granted a limited licence to use (display or print) the information for personal, non-commercial use only, provided the information is not modified and all copyright and other proprietary notices are retained. Any other use is strictly prohibited without our permission and the permission of the applicable rights' holders. None of the information may be otherwise reproduced, reverse engineered, republished, or re-disseminated in any manner or form without our prior written consent. Nothing contained herein shall be construed as conferring any right in any copyright in any of the information provided on the website or imply that a licence has been granted in respect of any trademarks, service marks, or trade names displayed.

The Let’s Talk Series is a collection of resources designed to promote discussion and understanding of how key concepts in health equity apply in public health practice. Each resource contains discussion questions to spark dialogue, reflection, and action to address the social determinants of health.

Welcome to our glossary of essential health equity terms. 

We created the glossary to respond to practitioner requests to promote the use of clear and effective language – within public health and across sectors and regions in Canada – in order to enhance powerful communication and action on the social determinants of health and health equity. 

The terms are organized under four categories. Each definition is followed by an example of how you could use it in a discussion with a colleague or community partner.

We’d like to hear from you. Does the definition, and the way we use the term in a sentence, make sense to you? 

To send us feedback on a particular term, please use the comment boxes that are placed under each term. You can also e-mail comments to nccdh@stfx.ca. The terms will be updated regularly on our website, based on your feedback, as well as on evolving usage in the public health community.

A PDF version of the glossary is available for download from the Resource Library.

National Collaborating Centre for Determinants of Health

St. Francis Xavier University
2400 Mount Saint Bernard
Camden Hall, 2nd Floor
PO Box 5000
Antigonish, Nova Scotia, Canada, B2G 2W5

Telephone: (902) 867-6133

Email: nccdh@stfx.ca

Territorial acknowledgement

We would like to begin by acknowledging that we are in Mi’kma’ki, the ancestral and unceded territory of the Mi’kmaq People. This territory is covered by the “Treaties of Peace and Friendship” which Mi’kmaq and Wolastoqiyik (Maliseet) peoples first signed with the British Crown in 1725. The treaties did not deal with surrender of lands and resources but in fact recognized Mi’kmaq and Wolastoqiyik (Maliseet) title and established the rules for what was to be an ongoing relationship between nations.

We acknowledge this land not only in thanks to the Indigenous communities who have held relationship with this land for generations but also in recognition of the historical and on-going legacy of colonialism.

Out of respect for the important work of reconciliation, we encourage you to contact us if you can suggest a way improve upon our statement above.

Project Coordinator

The National Collaborating Centre for Determinants of Health (NCCDH) is seeking a project coordinator.

This position will provide coordination and assistance to NCCDH programs and projects, with focus on Health Equity Clicks: Community, an online network; the Centre’s Organizational Capacity for Public Health Equity Initiative; and knowledge translation resources and training. 

The ideal candidate is a bilingual, self-directed professional who communicates, partners and works independently and in teams effectively. They have a passion for health equity as a driver of social justice.

Click here for more information.

The position to be filled is long-term temporary. (Start date ASAP; planned end date is March 31, 2020.) Preferred location is Antigonish, NS, with location of work / home office negotiable. Review of applications will begin on Monday, July 23, 2018, and will continue until the position is filled.

Please send a cover letter and resume in confidence to Human Resources, StFX University (careers@stfx.ca).

 


 

Knowledge Translation Specialist (Temporary)

The National Collaborating Centre for Determinants of Health (NCCDH) is seeking one or two short-term knowledge translation specialists.

This position will design/adapt and deliver training programs as part of a multi-organization collaborative. Located in Ontario, this position will contribute to building capacity related to Ontario’s revised Public Health Standards and the Patients First: Action Plan for Health Care. This position reports to the Senior Knowledge Translation Specialist.

The ideal candidate is a self-directed professional who communicates, partners and works independently and in teams effectively. They have a passion for health equity as a driver of social justice.

Click here for more information.

The position to be filled is temporary. (Start date ASAP; planned end date is March 31, 2019, with possible extension.) Option of part-time. Location of work is Ontario, with expectation of working from home. Review of applications will begin on Monday, July 23, 2018, and will continue until the position is filled.

Please send a cover letter and resume in confidence to Human Resources, StFX University (careers@stfx.ca).

Established in 2005 and funded through the Public Health Agency of Canada, the National Collaborating Centres (NCCs) produce information to help public health professionals improve their response to public health threats, chronic disease and injury, infectious diseases and health inequities. The NCCs are located across Canada, and each focuses on a different public health priority. The six centres are:

The National Collaborating Centre for Determinants of Health is proud to work closely with other National Collaborating Centres for Public Health on several joint projects and initiatives.

Recently released NCC collaborative work includes:

With other NCCs, we are currently:

  • developing a framework and tool kit to support health equity integrated population health status reporting;
  • learning how environmental health officers integrate attention to social determinants of health in their work and what needs they experience; and
  • coordinating webinars for community medicine residents and public health physicians.

We partner with the other Centres at our user forums and in conference presentations and workshops. For instance, in 2014/15, the NCC for Methods and Tools and the NCC for Healthy Public Policy and the NCC for Determinants of Health will coordinate presentations and workshops at a Maritime Public Health Conference – Health for All. In 2013/14, the NCC for Aboriginal Health joined us at a Manitoba User Forum and at the Health Equity Agenda Summit in Saskatoon. We have also co-delivered workshops with the NCC for Environmental Health at Canadian Public Health Association Conference and the Canadian Institute of Public Health Inspectors Conference. 

The NCCDH hosts the NCCPH Communications Coordinator, and guides communications and promotion planning for the NCC collaborative.

To learn more about the NCCPH program and to visit each of the Centres, click here.  Sign up for the National Collaborating Centre for Public Health e-bulletin.

Assess and report on a) the existence and impact of health inequities, and b) effective strategies to reduce these inequities.

Assess and report includes public health surveillance activities, specifically “the ongoing systematic collection, analysis, interpretation and dissemination of health data for the planning, implementation and evaluation of public health action” (Choi, 2012).  It also includes assessing and reporting effective strategies to reduce inequities.

Four of the promising practices, identified to guide local public health practice to reduce social inequities in health, are related to assessment and reporting:  purposeful reporting, health equity target setting, equity-focused health impact assessment and contributing to the evidence base.

 

Highlights from projects

Population health status reporting is a vital tool for addressing the social determinants of health and advancing health equity. The way that health data is collected, analyzed and shared shapes our perceptions of population health and influences our ability to act. Public health practitioners and organizations from across Canada have identified the need for resources, tools and collaborative learning on population health status reporting. In 2012, we hosted a national learning circle of practitioners and academics engaged in knowledge exchange and synthesis. Capital Health (Halifax) served as an applied practice site, as they integrated a health equity lens into their first population health status report. Evidence and knowledge gathered over the learning circle process were disseminated to our audience through nine synthesis documents, four videos and numerous events.

Equity-integrated population health status reporting: Action framework

The NCCDH, with contributions from each of the National Collaborating Centres for Public Health, has completed a Population Health Status Reporting – Toolkit Project.

This resource presents an accessible action framework for people who are creating community health status reports, as well as people interested in learning how to use PHSR to drive action on improving health equity. 

For more information, click here

View related NCCDH produced resources. 

Lead, support and participate with other organizations in policy analysis and development, and in advocacy for improvements in health determinants and inequities.

Participating in policy development and advocacy is a key role for public health to improve health equity because policies that promote health improve conditions where people live, work and play.

Three of the promising practices, identified to guide local public health practice to reduce social inequities in health, are related to policy development and advocacy: health equity target setting, intersectoral action and community engagement.

The NCCPH program has an NCC that is fully focused on healthy public policy. Because of this, the NCCDH doesn’t emphasize this role. At the NCCDH we partner with the National Collaborating Centre for Healthy Public Policy and other NCCs on resources that look at policy development and advocacy with a view that critically considers the social determinants of health and health equity. Visit the NCC for healthy public policy for more resources related to policy development and advocacy.

Highlights from projects are:

Tools and approaches for assessing and supporting public health action on the social determinants of is a joint NCCDH and NCCHPP document that offers analysis of various tools including the capacity og each to create policy recommendations.

Health Equity Tools for Policy Change is a powerpoint presentation given by NCCDH staff to a gathering of 400 people at THRIVE! The tools is describes, from Alberta, Australia and the European Union, have been used widely to improve the equity outcome of policies and programs.

View related NCCDH  produced resources. 

Modify and orient interventions and services to help reduce inequities, with an understanding of the unique needs of populations that experience marginalization.

It is essential for public health programs to reach populations that experience marginalization. Programs and services must be planned, implemented and evaluated with a consideration of equity. 

Three of the promising practices, identified to guide local public health practice to reduce social inequities in health, are related to modify and orient: targeting with universalism, equity-focused health impact assessment, and early childhood development.

Highlights from projects

Let’s Talk… Universal and targeted approaches to health equity, part of the Let’s talk series, explored targeted, universal and blended approaches to public health interventions. In Let’ talk …Universal and targeted approaches to health equity a number of conceptual examples were given to help clarify the theory.  

Real-world examples are in development to help public health staff better understand how targeted and universal approaches can be blended to achieve better population health outcomes. The first, Learning from practice: Targeting within universalism at Capital Health, can be found here.

Upcoming - stay tuned!

Additional Learning from practice documents will demonstrate the integration of health equity into public health practice. 

View related NCCDH produced resources.

Effective communication is an important overarching factor to drive action about population level health differences that are avoidable, and therefore considered unfair.

Public health practitioners have an important role in communicating that where people live, work, play and learn has an effect on their opportunities to be healthy. Public health practitioners need to be enabled to understand and talk about how differences in health that are influenced by social and economic factors.

One of the promising practices, identified to guide local public health practice to reduce social inequities in health, is related to communication: social marketing.

 

Highlights from projects

Our Let’s Talk documents promote understanding of key concepts and contains questions to spark discussions. Two in this series especially focuses on terminology and how we use language: Let’s talk... Health equity and Let’s talk...Population and the power of language.


Upcoming – stay tuned!

In 2014, we will be releasing web-based French and English glossaries, with the purpose of moving toward a common understanding of essential terms.

In 2014, the Canadian Council on Social Determinants of Health, an intersectoral advisory committee to the Public Health Agency of Canada, released the document Communicating the social determinants of health: Guidelines for common messaging. In partnership with the Canadian Public Health Association we will release a resource to help practitioners to apply the guidelines.

View related NCCDH produced resources.

Partner with other government and community organizations to identify ways to improve health outcomes for populations that experience marginalization.

Because most of the social determinants of health lie outside of the health sector, working with multiple partners - including government, community organizations, communities, and specific populations - is an essential part of public health practice, especially considering that differences in our health are influenced by economic and societal factors.

Two promising practices, identified to guide local public health practice to reduce social inequities in health, are related to partner with other sectors: intersectoral action and community engagement.

 

Highlights from projects

In 2012, we released an expedited systematic review as part of our effort to explore “what works” to improve health equity through action casino online sverige on the social determinants of health. This review examines the question, “What is the impact and effectiveness of intersectoral action as a public health practice for health equity through action on the social determinants of health?” In 2013, we published an article about this study.

In 2013, a reference guide that describes 16 community engagement frameworks was created, as public health practitioners are increasingly using community engagement strategies.

Upcoming – stay tuned!

The NCCDH will release additional case examples that will highlight the role of partnering with other sectors and the community.

In early 2014, we dropped work on a review of reviews about the effectiveness of community engagement by public health to address determinants of health because a substantive, multi-faceted U.K. study was released that researched similar questions. We are summarizing and analyzing this new U.K. study – you’ll see our findings in products and events in 2014.

View related NCCDH produced resources.

Leadership is needed to build the capacity of public health practitioners, organizations and the field in general to improve the conditions where we live, work and play, and, ultimately, the health of our society.

In the 2008, the Chief Public Health Officer's report of Canada's strong, visionary leadership and shared as a common characteristic of jurisdictions That-have stepped ahead in health equity work. Leadership emerged as central to health equity work in our 2010 environmental scan and is a domain in the 2012 Core Competencies for Public Health in Canada.

One of the promising practices identified to help public health practice at the local level reduce social inequities in health, is related to leadership and capacity: Competencies and organizational standards. 

Highlights from projects

To Identify the factors and conditions that effectively influence public health leadership to address the social determinants of health and health equity, we conducted appreciative inquiry interviews with 14 public health leaders. The postponement What Contributes to successful public health leadership for health equity? An appreciative inquiry summarizes the findings and provides examples from Canadian public health practice. 

In 2013, we explored the use of "organizational standards" to make social inequities in public health priority. Public Health Speaks: Organizational standards as a promising practice for health equity is a summary of four interviews with Canadian public health experts reflecting on their experiences using "standards" to support organizational frameworks and renewal processes. 

To help managers and practitioners in the field find the right race for their professional development, we conducted a scan for online courses, in English and French, that were designed to increase participants' knowledge and skills in working towards health equity through the social determinants. To learn more about the methods for this work, click here. We also completed a brief assessment of each course for quality and relevance, resulting and recommended in 12 courses.

Upcoming - Stay tuned!

A scoping literature review and a qualitative synthesis of literature about effective public health leadership, and enablers and barriers to leadership capacity regarding health equity, are in development.

Additional examples are forthcoming, including a description of leadership in the Western Health Authority in Newfoundland and Labrador. A case study of Ontario's social determinants of health nurses will profile leadership by staff who aren't managers.

View NCCDH Produced related resources. 

At the NCCDH, to advance social determinants of health and health equity through public health practice and policy, we

  • translate and share knowledge and evidence to influence interrelated determinants
  • support the uptake and exchange of information, products and services
  • identify gaps in research and practice
  • engage in collaborative learning projects and support translation of applied research 
  • support inter-personal  and inter-organizational connections that enable strong relationships

Our strategic priorities are significantly informed by our Advisory Board; the 2010 and 2013 pan-Canadian environmental scans, and 10 promising practices to guide local public health practice to reduce inequities in health.

In this part of our website, we profile our projects in relation to public health roles that we promote to improve health equity. All of these roles come from our 2010 environmental scan; four primary roles are explained further in our Let’s talk: Roles for improving health equity. Our projects are organized under the most aligned role, although we recognize that many projects cross-cut two or more roles.

In each section of this part of the website, we briefly describe the role, highlights from several related projects, summaries of projects in development, and direct you to published resources, events, blogs and Health Equity Clicks: Community conversations.

This list is an evolving scan of public health and health organizations that are taking action on the social determinants of health and advancing health equity.

Health Equity Clicks: Organizations will be of interest to public health practitioners and researchers across the country, and is designed to:

  • Enhance knowledge about key players that support action on the determinants of health
  • Increase connections among public health professionals who address health equity

This list of organizations builds on the 2010 NCCDH Environmental Scan Integrating Social Determinants of Health and Health Equity into Canadian Public Health Practice. In 2012, the Canadian Institute for Health Information - Canadian Population Health Initiative (CIHI-CPHI) shared an internal catalogue describing organizations that generate population health-related knowledge with NCCDH. This catalogue, created in January 2011 and updated in January 2012, has been used to support this online resource by identifying new Canadian and international organizations. 

Organizations were identified from:

  • The 2010 NCCDH Environmental Scan
  • Online searches using key words relevant to the social determinants of health and health equity
  • The CIHI-CPHI database profiling organizations that generate population health-related knowledge
  • Consultations and feedback received from public health practitioners

The list of organizations is non-comprehensive as Canadian contributions to the social determinants of health and health equity are continuously evolving and progressing. We welcome your input, comments, corrections, updates, and additions. We encourage you to help us strengthen this resource by emailing us your suggestions.  We will update this list on a bi-annual basis based on feedback received with the goal of making it as useful as possible to practitioners and researchers in the field.

English Content

Are you part of working group, network, or committee related to the social determinants of health and health equity?

We are pleased to offer members of the Health Equity Clicks community a space for group collaboration. You can use group space to share resources, save files (e.g. meeting minutes) and have ongoing conversations.

Please note that you will be responsible for inviting other community members to join your group, and for maintaining the discussion threads. We will monitor groups periodically and inactive groups may be archived. The title of the group will appear in the primary language of the group members.

To propose a new group, and/or to learn more, please contact Sume Ndumbe-Eyoh

Click the link below to start the sign up process!

We will be in touch soon to address you suggestions, concerns and questions. Thanks for your time.

Click the link below to create an account.

Integrating health equity and the social determinants of health into Canadian public health practice

At the National Collaborating Centre for Determinants of Health (NCCDH), we provide the Canadian public health community with knowledge and resources to take action on the social determinants of health, to close the gap between those who are most and least healthy.

We work with the public health field to move knowledge into action—in practice, in policy and in decision making—to achieve societal improvements that result in health for all.

We are one of six national collaborating centres funded through a Public Health Agency of Canada program.

We are hosted at St. Francis Xavier University (StFX) in Antigonish, Nova Scotia (Mi’kma’ki).

StFX has a rich history in social justice beginning in the 1920s with the Antigonish Movement. The Movement began, led by Father Jimmy Thompkins and Dr. Moses Coady, as a local community-based movement in response to poverty affecting disadvantaged groups in Eastern Canada. StFX quickly created an Extension Department to teach and use these community actions and adult education methods. After World War II, the Coady International Institute was founded to continue this work with an international audience. The Institute is well respected worldwide as a centre for leadership education about community-based development. Situating the NCCDH here furthers StFX’s deep commitment to applying knowledge to social change.

We would like to acknowledge this sacred land on which the NCCDH operates. We acknowledge that we are located in Mi’kma’ki, the ancestral and unceded territory of the Mi’kmaq People. This territory is covered by the “Treaties of Peace and Friendship” which Mi’kmaq and Wolastoqiyik (Maliseet) peoples first signed with the British Crown in 1725. The treaties did not deal with surrender of lands and resources but in fact recognized Mi’kmaq and Wolastoqiyik (Maliseet) title and established the rules for what was to be an ongoing relationship between nations. We acknowledge this land in thanks to the Mi’kmaq people who have held relationship with this land for generations and to recognize the historical and ongoing reality of colonialism.

Out of respect for the important work of reconciliation, we encourage you to contact us if you can suggest a way improve upon our statement above.

Public health organizations and practitioners address determinants of health through multiple means. Based on the findings of our 2010 environmental scan, the NCCDH decided on a focused knowledge translation analysis of current interventions that have a basis of success, starting  with ten practices identified as ‘promising’ by the Sudbury and District Health Unit.

To find out more about these promising practices we conducted an expedited systematic review about intersectoral action as a public health strategy to address the social determinants of health.

We are currently

  • Synthesizing evidence about community engagement as a public health method to influence knowledge and action related to the social determinants of health
  • Developing a process to assess evidence on the use of core competencies and organizational standards by public health as techniques to advance organizational commitment to reducing health inequities

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We want to make it easier for public health practitioners, researchers, and leaders to share what works to advance health equity.

Leave us your email, and we will invite you to become a founding member of Health Equity Clicks: Community.

Why become a member?

  •     To collaborate with like-minded colleagues working across Canada
  •     To ask questions in a safe space
  •     To share your work and experiences
  •     To participate in networking events

To find out more, contact our knowledge broker

 

Our Advisory Board provides advice to our Scientific Director to inform and influence our work. The Board members bring a pan-Canadian perspective, and act as a liaison between our Centre and public health practitioners, students, researchers, policy makers and community groups. Members are practitioners and academics from most Canadian provinces and territories who come from a range of expertise, backgrounds and networks.

 

Population health status reporting is a vital tool for addressing the social determinants of health and advancing health equity. The way that health data is collected and shared shapes our perceptions of population health and influences our ability to support action. Public health practitioners and organizations from across Canada have identified the need for resources, tools, and collaborative learning on this topic.

The National Collaborating Centre for Determinants of Health is working to enhance reporting by supporting an initiative that engages in collaborating learning, synthesis and reflection. Through a series of discussions, demonstrations, and presentations the NCCDH is hosting a learning circle. Our learning circle includes managers, directors, researchers, epidemiologists, and medical officers of health from across Canada. The learning circle provides advice and new skills to support Capital Health in Halifax as they work to integrate a health equity lens into their first population health status report for 2013.

To learn more...

-Download syntheses of key topics from the The Learning Together Series, available in our Resource Library

-Visit our new YouTube channel, to watch four new videos on population health status reporting

-Read related blog posts

-Start a discussion about population health status reporting in Health Equity Clicks, our online community. You can also read through a past discussion called "What are the best indicators for assessing and supporting health equity in the delivery of public health programs and services?"

One of four videos available on our YouTube Channel: Integrating health equity into population health status reporting - The role of public health 

The National Collaborating Centre for Determinants of Health is committed to maintaining confidentiality and personal privacy. The collection, use, disclosure, and retention of personal information must comply-with the privacy policy of our host organization, St. Francis Xavier University. This policy is attached below, and available at http://www.stfx.ca/privacy/personal-information/

1. Personal Information: Collection, Use and Disclosure

1.1 Purpose

On November 23, 2000, the Nova Scotia Freedom of Information & Protection of Privacy Act, (hereafter FOIPOP), was amended to include all records in the care and custody of Nova Scotian universities. As of this date university records are considered public records. The FIOPOP Act ensures that public bodies, including universities, are accountable to the public, that the public has a right to have access to records, the right to the adjustment of personal information about themselves, and the right to question the unauthorized collection, use, or disclosure of personal information. St. Francis Xavier University is committed to the appropriate collection, use, and disclosure of general and personal information in accordance with the FOIPOP Act.

1.2 Scope and Responsibility

Many St. FX employees are required to collect, use, and disclose general and personal information during their employment with the University. These are required to have an understanding of the FOIPOP Act and its Implications, especially in regard to the collection, use, and disclosure of personal information. These policies apply to all St. FX employees. Disciplinary action may result if these policies arent followed.

1.3 Definition

According to the FOIPOP Act personal information is defined as:

  •  the individual's name, address or phone number,
  • the individual's race, national or ethnic origin, colour, or religious or political beliefs or associations,
  •  the individual's age, sex, sexual orientation, marital status casinospel på nätet or family status,
  • an identifying number, symbol or other particular assigned to the individual,
  • the individual's fingerprints, blood type or inheritable characteristics,
  • information about the individual's health-care history, including a physical mental or disability,
  • information about the individual's educational, financial, criminal or employment history,
  • anyone else's opinions about the individual, and
  • the individual's personal views or opinions, except if they are about someone else.

2. Policies

2.1 Collection

Personal information is not permitted to be collected unless the information directly relates to University activities or is necessary for the enactment of a University program or activity. Personal information is not permitted to be collected, used, or disclosed for the personal or benefit of University employees.

2.2 Use

Personal information must only be collected for the purpose for which that information was obtained or compiled, or for a use compatible with that purpose.

2.3 Security

All University records are to be housed and maintained in a secure location to prohibit unauthorized access, use, or disclosure. All records (regardless of media) are to be kept in secure enclosures (i.e. locked filing cabinets or password protected automated systems, etc.) To protect the confidentiality of the records, all reasonable measures should be undertaken. Only those University employees who require access to the information are to be granted admittance to it. Confidential records are to be identified as such and are not to be filed with general records. One person shoulds be designated for each office/department and will have the ultimate responsibility for the records.

2.4 Correction of Errors and / or omissions

An individual may make application to have errors or omissions corrected in relation to personal information about them. Upon making a request the University will correct and annotate information with an amendment, when satisfactory documentary evidence is provided to support the correction.

2.5 Disclosure

StFX employees may disclose personal information within the University (i.e. from office to office) if the information is necessary to perform necessary University activities. Individuals are to be notified upon collection of the information that personal information may be shared within the University for work related matters but not to outside third parties without written consent, or upon exemptions in the FOIPOP Act. University personnel may release personal information about any individual; if the individual has consented in writing to its disclosure, for a use compatible with the original purpose for which it was obtained or compiled, for the purposes of complying with a subpoena, warrant, or summons; for the collecting of a debt owed to the University, or for the making of a payment to the University, to the representative of the bargaining agent authorized in writing by the employee, to an officer/employee of the University when it is necessary for the performance of duties, for the protection of the health or safety of University personnel, for the necessary requirements of University operation or law enforcement, so that the next of kin/friend of an injured, ill or deceased individual may be contacted, and/or if the President of the University (or prescribed representation) determines that compelling circumstances exist that affect anyone's health or safety.

2.6 Disclosure for research purpose

St. Francis Xavier University may disclose personal information for a research purpose, including statistical research. This information is only permitted if the research cannot reasonably be undertaken unless that information is made available in individually identifiable form. This can only be undertaken if any record linkage is not harmful to the individuals that information is about and that the benefits derived will be clearly in the public interest, the President of the University (or prescribed representative) has approved conditions relating to the security and confidentiality and the removal or destruction of individual identifiers, the prohibition of any subsequent use/disclosure of that information in individually identifiable form without the express authorization of the University, and the person to whom that information is disclosed has signed an agreement complying with approved conditions regarding that act and with the University's policies.

Our health is determined to a large extent by the conditions of everyday life, and by the systems put in place to promote health, prevent disease, and support us when we get sick. The ‘social determinants of health’ (SDH) is a name given to the many social conditions that interact to influence our health and well-being, the circumstances in which people are born, grow up, live, work and age. 


The World Health Organization (WHO) Commission on the Social Determinants of Health wrote in their final report that the “unequal distribution of health-damaging experiences is not in any sense a ‘natural phenomenon but is the result of a toxic combination of poor social policies and programs, unfair economic arrangements, and bad politics.” 

The WHO Commission proposes three overarching recommendations for action to improve the SDH, including:

  • Improve daily living conditions;
  • Tackle the inequitable distribution of power, money, and resources;
  • Measure and understand the problem and assess the impact of action.
     

Explore key historical documents and resources to learn more about the social determinants of health.

 

 

We are dedicated to facilitating knowledge exchange between and among public health practitioners, researchers, and decision makers working to advance health equity. To help keep track of exchange opportunities related to public health, the social determinants of health, and health equity, we have created an Workshops & Events section. As in the Resource Library, we have categorized each event so that they are easy to browse by topic or by type.

Ongoing exchange opportunities also exist within our online network. To learn more, and to become a founding member, visit Health Equity Clicks: Community.

 

Our resource library contains more than 150 resources. The library is evolving, as we continue to add resources that are relevant, geared to practice, and either recently published or foundational to current health equity thinking in public health. To suggest a new resource or to learn more about our resource selection process, please contact us.

The right-hand side bar offers two options to search this library:

  1. You can use the search box by entering the title of a document, part of a title, an author or a key word. This search function is sensitive to spelling.
  2. You can choose options from some or all of the categories, including searching only NCCDH produced resources.

If you are logged into our online community, you can write in the comment box at the bottom of each summary, and view comments from others. To log in or to sign up as a member, click here.

We also have several curated resource library lists available:

 

In 2010, we conducted an environmental scan to learn more about the needs of public health professionals in their efforts to integrate knowledge on the social determinants of health into their work. Respondents from across Canada agreed that public health leaders and organizations play a vital role in advancing health equity.

In his first Report on the State of Public Health in Canada, David Butler-Jones, Canada’s Chief Public Health Officer, said

“high-level leadership in all sectors – health and otherwise – is crucial to reducing health inequalities.”

But what factors enable public health leadership? And how are these factors different across Canada? Our aim is to analyze and translate knowledge about public health leadership to help leaders improve and mitigate the effects of social determinants of health and advance health equity. Our intent is to identify effective practices, describe enablers and barriers that influence leadership, and identify tools and strategies to support leaders.

We will do this by means of:

  • A rapid systematic review of literature;
  • Appreciative inquiry with leaders and case learning

Health Equity Clicks: OrganizationsHealth Equity Clicks: Organizations builds upon Integrating Social Determinants of Health and Health Equity into Canadian Public Health Practice, the Environmental Scan conducted by the National Collaborating Centre for the Determinants of Health in 2010 by identifying public health organizations that are addressing the determinants of health to improve health equity in Canada.

This resource will be of interest to public health practitioners and researchers across the country, and is designed to:

-Enhance knowledge about key players that support action on the determinants of health

-Increase connections among public health professionals who address health equity. This list is a preliminary scan of public health and health organizations that are taking action on the social determinants of health and advancing health equity.

Organizations were identified by:

-Reviewing organizations included in the Environmental Scan undertaken in 2010

-Conducting online searches using key words relevant to the social determinants of health and health equity. Criteria included: Organizations with a public health focus (e.g. public health units, public/population health research and policy organizations); Explicit online mention of the social determinants of health and/or health equity

-Searching for organizations across the country to ensure Pan-Canadian coverage

-Consultations with public health practitioners

The list is non-comprehensive as Canadian contributions to determinants of health and health equity are continuously evolving and progressing. The numerous partnerships and networks involved in advancing health equity make describing and categorizing the contributions difficult. Furthermore, it focuses on public health and closely-related health organizations and does not include the myriad of organizations outside of health that are instrumental and important for action on the social determinants of health.

This is a work in progress, and we welcome your input, comments, corrections, updates and additions. We would like to encourage you to help us strengthen this resource by emailing us your suggestions. We will update this list on a quarterly basis based on feedback received with the goal of making it as useful as possible to practitioners and researchers in the field.

Our work is related to the social determinants of health and/or health equity, and we focus specifically on public health organizations and practitioners.

Each of our current initiatives is informed by the results of a pan-Canadian environmental scan, Integrating Social Determinants of Health and Health Equity into Canadian Public Health Practice.

Visit the following pages for more information:

  • The Promising Practices for Health Equity
  • Public Health Leadership
  • Population Health Status Reporting

 

Stay tuned to events across the NCCs by bookmarking the collective calendar!

Please note that events appear in Eastern Standard Time, and titles reflect the language of delivery.

 

In this section you will find background information on the social determinants of health, a listing of resources produced by the NCCDH, as well as a collection of resources we are calling our Resource Library. The resource library is not comprehensive and will evolve over time.

We will continue to ensure that additions to our resource library are relevant and evidence-informed, and your feedback is welcome. To suggest a new resource or to learn more about our resource selection process, please contact us.

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