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The NCCDH has launched a 20-month participatory initiative to test ways to develop organizational capacity to advance health equity (project overview). The project is using an international learning circle, working in tandem with three practice sites to learn what frameworks, strategies and organizational conditions are most useful and effective to develop and sustain Canadian public health organizational capacity for health equity action.

As of May 2018, three sites have been selected, each with a focus on a specific public health challenge of interest to multiple programs. The sites represent different organizational models (e.g., health unit, department within health authority) and differing contexts (e.g., rural and urban, and geography/population size served by department). The practice sites will engage in exchange and co-learning among the other sites involved.
 

Learn more about the participating site projects below.

Site name Project description
Interior Health (BC) Implementing a health equity lens in opioid overdose surveillance and reporting

The project aims to support the implementation of a health equity lens in the reporting, monitoring and surveillance practices related to the overdose crisis, guided by the “Equity-integrated PHSR (EI-PHSR) action framework."

Ottawa Public Health (ON) Client and community engagement

OPH will develop a departmental client and community engagement framework and an engagement policy that incorporate a health equity/SDOH perspective.

Provincial Health Services Authority (BC) PHSA Indigenous Cultural Safety (ICS) Strategy: Implementation and Evaluation

This project focuses on the development of a comprehensive plan for implementation and evaluation of the ICS Strategy, which aims to transform PHSA-wide services to be a leading health organization where Indigenous people receive equitable and timely continuity of care, access to quality health services, and feel safe as both clients and employees within the system.

 
Check back to this page for updates on the project, or subscribe to the NCCDH mailing list.

Promoting equity in the built environment: The who, what and when

Environmental health, Rural / urban , National Collaborating Centre for Determinants of Health

Canada’s chief public health officer has identified that bringing attention to “how the built environment contributes to widening or reducing health inequities”[4] is a priority for promoting and improving the health of all Canadians. As we try to understand this relationship further, we think it is important to consider three questions.

Imagine 2048: A reflection on the future of health promotion practice

Income inequality, Racism/racialization, National Collaborating Centre for Determinants of Health

Imagine the world in 2048. What do you see? I imagine a world in which a greater proportion of humanity gets to partake in the beauty and bounty the world has to offer while being buffered from more of its downsides. It brings to mind what Arundhati Roy imagines as “another world.” In this “another world” described by Roy, three things will be central to health promotion practice.

NCCDH staff becoming anti-racist through informed dialogue: 2 of 2

Racism/racialization, National Collaborating Centre for Determinants of Health, Ongoing work towards becoming anti-racist

Our staff team at the National Collaborating Centre for the Determinants of Health (NCCDH) is engaged in a long-term initiative to become anti-racist, in part by engaging in staff readings and guided discussions. This blog post describes our group conversation process and the sessions we held between June 2017 and January 2018. See the companion blog post, "NCCDH staff becoming anti-racist through informed dialogue: 1 of 2," for an introduction to this blog post.

NCCDH staff becoming anti-racist through informed dialogue: 1 of 2

Racism/racialization, National Collaborating Centre for Determinants of Health, Ongoing work towards becoming anti-racist

In the summer and fall of 2016, the National Collaborating Centre for Determinants of Health (NCCDH) initiated an all-staff process to become more anti-racist. My first “Becoming anti-racist” post from March 2017 describes the NCCDH’s intention to hold monthly learning discussions and introduces the circle way method that we adopted. My more recent entries report on our discussions and the resources we used to help us learn.

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