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Blog: Environmental health

Promoting equity in the built environment: The who, what and when

Canada’s chief public health officer has identified that bringing attention to “how the built environment contributes to widening or reducing health inequities”[4] is a priority for promoting and improving the health of all Canadians. As we try to understand this relationship further, we think it is important to consider three questions.

MUSE: A pan-Canadian project promoting health equity through built environments

The NCCDH recently participated in the first full gathering of the Multisectoral Urban Systems for Health and Equity in Canadian Cities (MUSE) project, a Canada-wide initiative to analyze how local municipalities, public health and community organizations work together to design our cities to promote fair distribution of health outcomes.

Health equity integrated into organizational practice and community engagement

Looking back at the last 10 years I have worked in the field of environmental health, the most memorable and rewarding career moments all involved connecting with the public, educating others and effecting change. These are the moments that inspire me and motivate me to continue my career in public health.

Collaborating across sectors to work through jurisdictional challenges

In over 20 years of working in public health, I have seen how Environmental Health Officers (EHOs) can be effective advocates for individual clients, but knowing when to intervene in an individual case in the name of public health can be a challenge.

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