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Blog: Ongoing work towards becoming anti-racist

NCCDH staff becoming anti-racist through informed dialogue: 2 of 2

Our staff team at the National Collaborating Centre for the Determinants of Health (NCCDH) is engaged in a long-term initiative to become anti-racist, in part by engaging in staff readings and guided discussions. This blog post describes our group conversation process and the sessions we held between June 2017 and January 2018. See the companion blog post, "NCCDH staff becoming anti-racist through informed dialogue: 1 of 2," for an introduction to this blog post.

NCCDH staff becoming anti-racist through informed dialogue: 1 of 2

In the summer and fall of 2016, the National Collaborating Centre for Determinants of Health (NCCDH) initiated an all-staff process to become more anti-racist. My first “Becoming anti-racist” post from March 2017 describes the NCCDH’s intention to hold monthly learning discussions and introduces the circle way method that we adopted. My more recent entries report on our discussions and the resources we used to help us learn.

Plenary from Public Health 2017: Racism in Society

One way that public health organizations can help dismantle racism is by facilitating conversations about how racial inequity plays out in social, scientific and legislative arenas. It is with this aim that I moderated the closing plenary session at the annual pan-Canadian public health gathering, Public Health 2017, in Halifax, NS, located in Mi’kma’ki, the ancestral and unceded territory of the Mi’kmaq People.

Symposium: Decolonizing our relationships through lateral kindness

At a symposium held at the Public Health 2017 conference, we learned about the concept of lateral kindness — a deliberate attempt by Indigenous communities to counter the lateral violence experienced as a result of colonization in Canada.

Indigenous KT and ways of knowing — what do they mean for public health?

Indigenous knowledge translation (KT) is a concept of central importance in public health practice. The recent annual conference of the Canadian Public Health Association (CPHA) highlighted many sessions reinforcing that the application, processes, outcomes, assumptions and integrity of research can all be strengthened by thinking about KT from an Indigenous perspective.

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