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Healthy built environment linkages toolkit: Making the links between design, planning and health, version 2.0

The physical surroundings made or modified by humans — the spaces in which we live, work and play — are known as the built environment[1]. Core features of the built environment include neighbourhood design, transportation networks, natural environments, food systems and housing. In order to help health professionals promote healthier built environments, the British Columbia Centre for Disease Control (BCCDC) led the development of the Healthy Built Environment Linkages Toolkit (HBE Linkages Toolkit) in collaboration with the British Columbia Healthy Built Environment Alliance Steering Committee.

Initially launched in 2014, with this updated version released in 2018, the HBE Linkages Toolkit provides an evidence-based conceptual framework and communication tool for conducting HBE work and supporting research and education in the field.1 The initial HBE Linkages Toolkit was developed following a scoping review, and both the 2014 and 2018 versions draw on extensive literature review and input from content experts. Findings were graded based on a weighted assessment criteria. 

For each of the core features of the built environment described above, the HBE Linkages Toolkit includes the following[1]:

  • Fact sheets with evidence-based key messages and suggestions for improving population health through healthy planning and design
  • Summaries of research links highlighting relationships between built environment features, intermediate impacts and health outcomes found in the literature
  • Health evidence diagrams that graphically depict the research evidence, indicating where strong, moderate or newly emerging impacts and outcomes exist
  • Broader considerations for practice including economic co-benefits, social well-being outcomes and small and medium-sized community contexts

Use this resource to

  • identify and communicate evidence-based messages on how appropriate planning and design of the built environment promote population health;
  • inform input into community projects, plans, and strategies; and
  • support research and education related to healthy built environments. 

Reference

British Columbia Centre for Disease Control. (2018). Healthy Built Environment Linkages Toolkit: Making the Links Between Design, Planning and Health, Version 2.0 [Internet]. Vancouver, BC: Provincial Health Services Authority. Available from: http://www.bccdc.ca/health-professionals/professional-resources/healthy-built-environment-linkages-toolkit

Reference list

1. British Columbia Centre for Disease Control. (2018). Healthy Built Environment Linkages Toolkit: Making the Links Between Design, Planning and Health, Version 2.0 [Internet]. Vancouver, BC: Provincial Health Services Authority. Available from: http://www.bccdc.ca/health-professionals/professional-resources/healthy-built-environment-linkages-toolkit

Tags: Environmental health, Public Health Organization, Link

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