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NCCDH resources: Climate change and health equity

NCCDH resources: Climate change and health equity

Some of the resources below are available in English only (and indicated as such)

Massive human-caused ecological changes, such as climate change, affect the health of communities across the globe. These health effects have a disproportionate impact on structurally disadvantaged populations, often exacerbating existing inequities.

To encourage public health practitioners to respond to changes in planetary health, and centre equity in their responses, the NCCDH has produced a number of different resources on this topic.

  • Climate change, health equity and public health responses: A curated list. This list of resources was selected to increase understanding of climate change as an urgent public health issue, situate climate change and health equity as being inextricably linked and support emerging public health practice in this area. 
  • Climate change and health equity” In this backgrounder, NCCDH Knowledge Translation Specialist Pemma Muzumdar discusses climate change as an urgent public health issue and a structural driver of inequity. She outlines related concepts such as unequal vulnerability, climate justice and climate debt.  
  • Centring equity in emerging public health responses to climate change” In this evidence review and commentary, Pemma Muzumdar identifies opportunities to integrate a health equity focus into emerging public health responses to a changing climate. She proposes a framework for public health roles to address climate change and improve health equity.  
  • Climate change — who is most vulnerable and why?” In this NCCDH student guest blog post, Daniel Jubas-Malz and Melissa Perri discuss climate change vulnerability, reflecting on some of the limitations of the climate change literature.
  • Learning from Practice: Advocacy for health equity — Environmental racism: This paper highlights the experience of the Nova Scotia-based Environmental Noxiousness, Racial Inequities and Community Health (ENRICH) project in advocating against environmental racism that impacts Mi’kmaq and African-Canadian communities.  
  • Webinar recording: Climate change, public health and equity: The goal of this webinar is to bring a public health voice to the issue of climate change, focusing particularly on the issue’s relationship to health equity at the local public health level. A recent document has been released through the Public Health Institute Center for Climate Change and Health and the American Public Health Association titled Climate change, health, and equity: A guide for local health departments.


Related resources from our peers

Tags: Climate change

Power – a health and social justice issue

This resource is available in English only.

This briefing document by National Health Service (NHS) Scotland is designed for multiple purposes: first, to spark discussion about how an unequal distribution of power causes health inequalities, and second, to inform related public health work.  

Power as a driver of social inequality

On page 4 of the document, the authors situate power, alongside income and wealth, as one of three fundamental drivers of social inequality.

A graphic on the same page titled “NHS Health Scotland’s theory of causation” depicts four related components that lead to avoidable and unfair health differences:

  • Fundamental causes (e.g., the unequal distribution of income, power and wealth)
  • Wider environmental influences (e.g., economic)
  • Individual experiences within the wider environmental influences (e.g., social and interpersonal)
  • Effects of your experiences (e.g., inequalities in healthy life expectancy)

Types and dimensions of power

The briefing note provides a useful overview of power as a concept, referencing four different types of power as described in the World Health Organization’s conceptual framework for action on the social determinants of health:

  • Power over (influencing others)
  • Power to (organizing to change power structures)
  • Power with (collective power of communities or organizations)
  • Power within (individual capacity)

Page 7 of the document reviews the different dimensions of power and the related opportunities to redistribute power and address health inequalities. Readers are encouraged to consider where the power in a situation is coming from, who has the power and where is the power exercised. The document also offers suggestions about where to intervene at multiple levels.  

Use this resource to

  • learn about the concept of power, including different types and dimensions of power;
  • recognize power as a fundamental driver of social inequality; and
  • begin conversations within your organization about how to address power through public health practice, programs and policies.

Reference

Dickie, E., Hearty, W., Fraser, A., McCartney, G., Doyle, E., & Myers, F. (2015). Power – a health and social justice issue. Edinburgh: NHS Health Scotland.

Related resources

Tags: Website

Health equity policy platform for COVID-19 response and recovery

This resource is available in English only.

This policy platform, designed by Human Impact Partners (HIP), highlights policy ideas that were generated by grassroot organizations, with the aim of establishing public health interventions led by communities most impacted by these inequities (e.g., Black, Indigenous and Latinx communities). Although written in the U.S. context, this document can inform policy interventions related to COVID-19 response and recovery in Canada.

Policy Platform

The HIP policy platform details policy recommendations in four distinct areas:

  1. Economic security

    Policies that focus on population health and health equity, rather than economic impact, response and recovery plans
     
  2. Housing security

    Policies to ensure housing for all, protect homeowners and renters, and prevent accumulation of debt during COVID-19
     
  3. Criminal legal system

    Policies to release currently imprisoned people, protect those who are incarcerated and limit new incarcerations
     
  4. Healthcare Access

    Policies to ensure all people have access to care, testing, treatment and personal protective equipment (PPE)

At the end of each section, the document provides specific guidance about how public health professionals can take action in each of the four areas.

Use this resource to

  • understand the inequities Black, Indigenous and Latinx communities face during COVID-19;
  • consider community-led policy options to address the economic, health and social inequities amplified by COVID-19; and
  • inform emergency preparedness plans for marginalized communities during COVID-19 and future public health emergencies. 

Reference

Human Impact Partners. (2020). Health equity policy platform for COVID-19 response and recovery. Oakland (U.S.): Human Impact Partners.

Related resources

Tags: COVID-19, Policy analysis, Racism/racialization, Platform

Black Experiences in Health Care Symposium: Bringing together community and health systems for improved health outcomes

This resource is available in English only.

Held on January 30, 2020, the Black Experiences in Health Care Symposium (BEHCS) generated rich, action-oriented dialogue about advancing Black health in Ontario. This important report of the proceedings is authored by This important report of the proceedings is authored by Black Health Alliance and Health Commons Solutions Lab and is and relevant to practitioners across Canada. It captures knowledge and experience shared during keynote presentations and breakout sessions. Readers can engage further by following links to keynote presentation videos, blog posts and other useful resources.

Recommendations to advance Black health

The report builds on themes that emerged within the symposium with 16 recommendations (p. 9–10) related to race-based data, accountability, mental health, systems change and building trust and solidarity.

These recommendations are summarized below:

Race-based data

  • Recognize the importance of collecting and using race-based data to improve and develop Black health strategies.
  • Partner with large health data and information entities.
  • Ensure race-based data collection spans across the continuum of care.
  • Identify ways to support multigenerational ways of knowing to inform data collection, analysis and interpretation.
  • Identify and support those already conducting research within or for Black communities.

Accountability

  • Hold all publicly funded government agencies and health service providers accountable for race-based data collection, working towards improved care and outcomes for Black Ontarians and including Black leadership at all levels.
  • Improve communication with Black communities regarding data collection and use.
  • Increase accountability measures for universities and other research for around transparency and intended data use when engaging with Black communities.

Promote positive mental health

  • Create accessible and culturally competent mental health services for Black people and communities in Ontario.
  • Expand funding and services to support the families and loved ones of Black people experiencing mental illness.

Change systems to invest in Black health

  • Conduct an environmental scan to ascertain what has already been documented and learn where work is already occurring.
  • Standardize and mandate anti-Black racism, anti-oppression and decolonization training.
  • Establish monitoring and assessing systems for diversity in health care leadership.
  • Develop a Black-led strategy to identify Black representatives for community engagement opportunities in health care and to reflect the diversity within Black communities.

Build trust and solidarity

  • Create paid positions and roles for community trust–builders in health provider organizations.
  • Support, resource and fund platforms that are building solidarity amongst racialized communities.

Mobilizing the information in this report

To ensure that this report leads to meaningful action, readers are guided to take several next steps, detailed on page 11:

  • Share key findings from the report and promote related work.
  • Develop a Black-led strategy aimed at improving Black health.
  • Engage in opportunities to build alignment and solidarity with other racialized communities.

Use this resource to

  • convene conversations within your public health organization to mobilize the knowledge, connections and recommendations shared in this report;
  • connect with those leading existing work for Black communities and identify opportunities to support, partner and coordinate; and
  • advocate for accountability measures and strategies to improve Black health outcomes.

Reference

Black Health Alliance, Health Commons Solutions Lab. (2020). Black Experiences in Health Care Symposium: Bringing together community and health systems for improved health outcomes. Toronto, ON: Health Commons Solutions Lab.

Related resources

Tags: Community engagement, Cultural competency, Mental Health, Racism/racialization, Report/document

Racism, anti-racism and racial equity webinar series

Racism, anti-racism and racial equity webinar series

These webinars are available in the language in which they were originally delivered, either English or French as noted below.

The National Collaborating Centre for Determinants of Health (NCCDH) has produced a suite of webinars and other related resources that, when reviewed together, serve as a substantive primer on racism, anti-racism and racial equity as they relate to public health practice.

This webinar series can be used for both individual and organizational learning.

As a group, they create the space to review relevant evidence and knowledge in an organizational setting. This includes important discussions about how public health institutions and the larger community should:

  • recognize racism as an oppressive system that harms health;
  • disrupt racism and colonialism in active ways; and
  • collaborate to invest in healthy communities.

While there may be some overlap in the content of these webinars, we recommend that these webinar recordings be viewed in the following order:  

  1. Webinar recording: “Racing” the social determinants of health and health equity (Part 1 of 2)
  2. Webinar recording: Racial health equity: Embracing a decolonial, anti-racist practice (part of the Public Health Training for Equitable Systems Change on-demand webinar series, and also available in French under the title Équité raciale en santé : véhiculer des pratiques décolonisatrices et dépourvues de racisme)
  3. Webinar recording: Can understanding Whiteness improve anti-racism activities in health?
  4. Webinar recording: “Racing” the social determinants of health and health equity (Part 2 of 2)
  5. Webinar recording: Disrupting the colour-coded labour market: Implications for public health organizations

Webinars that focus on working with specific racialized communities:

Related resources:

Tags: Indigenous health , Racism/racialization, National Collaborating Centre for Determinants of Health, Webinar

Health Promotion Canada webinar series

Health Promotion Canada webinar series

These webinars are available in the language in which they were originally delivered, either English or French as noted below.

The NCCDH and Health Promotion Canada (HPC) collaborated on a series of webinars to highlight several chapters of the book Health promotion in Canada, 4th edition: New perspectives on theory, practice, policy, and research.

The goal of the webinars is to explore how various themes in this book apply to public health action on health equity by pairing the authors’ content with practitioner perspective on application to public health practice.

English-language webinar recordings:

French-language webinar recordings:

Webinar recordings from our peers on additional chapters from this resource:

Additional webinars in this series will be added to this page as they become available.

Related resources

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Introduction to health equity: Online course

This resource is available in English and French. The accessible learning PDF versions of this course are in the final stages of production and will be available in July 2020.

The NCCDH and Public Health Ontario have collaborated to create and release this jointly branded online course regarding health equity. Developed with the support of a pan-Canadian advisory group of public health practitioners and researchers, the course offers introductory material in self-directed and easily accessible online format.

Course objective

The objective of this project is to offer a free online introductory course to help public health staff and managers develop the knowledge, skills and competencies to support action on health equity.   

This online course consists of five online modules designed to:

  • provide foundational knowledge on health equity and the social determinants of health;
  • facilitate learner reflection;
  • illustrate health equity organizational capacity–building; and
  • provide examples of effective health equity action by public health. 

The five module topics are as follows:

  • Module 1: What are Health Inequities?    
  • Module 2: Pathways to Health Equity   
  • Module 3: Acting to Improve Health Equity 
  • Module 4: Reflections on World Views   
  • Module 5: Building Organizational Capacity for Equity Work 

Each bilingual module includes:

  • explanations of relevant terminology
  • video content explaining core concepts;
  • links to related resources; and
  • practical scenarios representing national and international evidence and perspectives.

Module content is also available as PDF for increased accessibility. The accessible learning PDF versions of this course are in the final stages of production and will be available in July 2020.

Use this resource to:

  • facilitate discussion about the social and structural roots of health inequities and the role of public health to address these factors;
  • strengthen personal and professional development plans for performance appraisals and other organizational human resources processes; and
  • explore the pathways through which health inequities are created and persist among multi-sectoral partners in public health initiatives.

Reference

National Collaborating Centre for Determinants of Health and Public Health Ontario. (2020). Introduction to Health Equity (online course). NCCDH, PHO: Antigonish, NS, and Toronto, ON.

Related resources

Tags: Key concepts, National Collaborating Centre for Determinants of Health, Public Health Association, Link, Online Course

COVID-19: Where to find quality information: Psychosocial and mental health impact/ health promotion/ health equity

This resource is an English-language website with resources in both English and French.
This Resource Library entry is a stub — a shortened entry. Please visit the resource link directly for more detail.

 

This living resource repository from the International Union of Health Promotion and Education (IUHPE) (an English-language website with resources in both English and French) provides links to other public health organizations and equity documents related to COVID-19.

 

Reference

International Union of Health Promotion and Education. (2020, June 29). COVID-19: Where to find quality information: Psychosocial and mental health impact/ health promotion/ health equity. https://www.iuhpe.org/index.php/en/iuhpenews/1360-covid-19-resources#Psychosocial

Tags: COVID-19, Mental Health, Socioeconomic status , Public Health Organization, Website

Why collecting race-based data during the coronavirus pandemic is a matter of life and death

Why collecting race-based data during the coronavirus pandemic is a matter of life and death

This resource is available in English only.
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This video from Global News provides an overview of the importance of collecting and reporting race-based data to guide strategies to address disparities in COVID-19.

 

Reference

Global News. (2020, June 1). Why collecting race-based data during the coronavirus pandemic is a matter of life and death [Video]. YouTube. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7KepfKI1bS8

Tags: COVID-19, Racism/racialization, Reporting and measurement, Webinar

Caring for vulnerable populations during the pandemic

Caring for vulnerable populations during the pandemic

This resource is available in English only.
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This webinar recording from the College of Family Physicians of Canada explores populations in Canada who are most vulnerable to COVID-19 due to structural inequities. These populations include Indigenous communities, those who are socially isolated, care home residents with disabilities and people who experience homelessness. 

 

Reference

College of Family Physicians of Canada. (2020, May 28). Caring for vulnerable populations during the pandemic [Video]. YouTube. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KlQLyOvYBzo

Tags: COVID-19, Indigenous health , Stigma, discrimination, Public Health Organization, Webinar

Social resources for Canadians impacted by COVID-19

This resource is available in English only.
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This resource repository from The Upstream Lab provides links to resources including a guide to providing social care during COVID-19 and links to socioeconomic supports. It also features resources related to health inequities and COVID-19.

 

Reference

The Upstream Lab. (2020, June 8). Social resources for Canadians impacted by COVID-19. https://upstreamlab.org/covid19/

Tags: Access to health services, COVID-19, Socioeconomic status , Website

Responding to COVID-19: Cities reducing poverty

This resource is available in English only.
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This report from Vibrant Communities and the Tamarack Institute describes community-based initiatives to meet community needs related to inequities in housing, food, access to services and other social determinants of health during COVID-19.

 

Reference

Vibrant Communities & Tamarack Institute. (2020). Responding to COVID-19: Cities reducing poverty. https://www.tamarackcommunity.ca/library/cities-reducing-poverty-responding-to-covid-19

Tags: Community engagement, COVID-19, Socioeconomic status , Public Health Organization, Report/document

Voices from the margins of a crisis

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This series of essays from the Centre for Research on Health Equity and Inclusion and the Pillar Nonprofit Network presents research combined with the lived experience of inequities during the COVID-19 pandemic.

 

Reference

Benjamin, T., & & Berman, H. (2020–). Voices from the margins of a crisis [Online essay series]. Centre for Research on Health Equity and Social Inclusion, Pillar Nonprofit Network. https://crhesi.uwo.ca/margins/

Tags: Community engagement, Socioeconomic status , Website

The Public Health Disparities Geocoding Project: COVID-19 resources

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This online data monitoring resource from the Public Health Disparities Geocoding Project offers links to conceptual and empirical publications related to epidemiological analysis and evidence of health inequities in COVID-19.

 

Reference

Krieger, N., Chen, J.T., & Waterman, P.D. (2020, May 15). The Public Health Disparities Geocoding Project: COVID-19 resources. Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health. https://www.hsph.harvard.edu/thegeocodingproject/covid-19-resources/

Tags: Access to health services, COVID-19, Intersectoral action, Website

Coronavirus response: Peer-to-peer resource sharing

This resource is available in English only.
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This online resource library from Community Commons is a living repository of equity-themed tools and resources that describe the equity implications of COVID-19 and actions to address these disparities.

 

Reference

Community Commons. (2020, March 13). Coronavirus response: Peer-to-peer resource sharing. https://www.communitycommons.org/entities/e98966a5-1874-495b-9026-dcbdf3456f86

Tags: COVID-19, Racism/racialization, Reporting and measurement, Journal article

Addressing law enforcement violence as a public health issue

This resource is available in English only.

Physical and psychological violence perpetuated by law enforcement authorities is an ongoing public health issue. In this document, the American Public Health Association (APHA) states that law enforcement policies and practices are often misused and disregard solutions to peace that are based on community-identified needs. The consequence of these strategies is that they further embed existing health inequities experienced due to racism and socioeconomic disadvantage.

Policy statement regarding police violence

This policy statement positions physical and psychological law enforcement violence against communities of colour as a public health equity issue. It features a robust literature review that describes the historical and systemic roots of police violence against socioeconomically disadvantaged communities. This includes policies that facilitate discriminatory policing and upholding hierarchies based on race and social class by targeting low-income communities of colour.

The research APHA draws on suggests that both the short- and long-term impacts of psychological and physical violence by law enforcement negatively affect the ability of people and communities of colour to achieve basic rights of housing, education, economic opportunities and access to services, as well as increased risk of death and chronic disease. Poor accountability for race-based violence by law enforcement is described as being reinforced by a lack of oversight and policies that enable structural racism to disproportionately target and use force with people of colour.

Actions for public health

The document offers ten actions that can be taken by federal, regional, local and other health authorities.

Key areas for public health action include the following:

  • Advocating for the elimination of police practices that target people of colour
  • Advocating for accountability measures for inappropriate treatment of Black and other racialized citizens and communities by law enforcement
  • Acting on racism as a contributor to health inequities
  • Working with law enforcement to address the social determinants of health at the root of inequities among racialized communities

For public health practitioners looking to learn more about law enforcement violence as a health equity issue, the statement’s expansive reference list is a useful source for future research.

Use this resource to:

  • facilitate a discussion between local, regional and provincial/territorial law enforcement agencies about collaborative work to address the impact of racism and police violence as a determinant of health equity for racialized communities;
  • identify areas for public health advocacy at the federal, provincial/territorial and municipal levels to support community-based and community-identified programs that reduce the impact of violence on the health of racialized communities; and
  • develop a plan for intersectoral initiatives including public health and law enforcement that address racism, stigma and discrimination against racialized communities.

Reference

American Public Health Association. (2018). Addressing Law Enforcement Violence as a Public Health Issue (Policy Number: 201811). Washington, DC: American Public Health Association.

Related resources

Tags: Healthy public policy, Key concepts, Racism/racialization, Link

What works in inclusion health: Overview of effective interventions for marginalised and excluded populations

This resource is available in English only.

In this article, the authors introduce the concept of “inclusion health,” defining it as “an emergent approach that aims to address extreme health and social inequities” [1, p. 266]. The goal of this strategy, they explain, is to draw attention to inequities experienced by individuals and groups who experience harm by being excluded from society.

In the absence of an agreed upon framework for inclusion, this article describes the application of an inclusion health approach to health system interventions for early intervention, improved access to services and reducing health inequities.

Components of an inclusion health approach

The article identifies and describes key components of an inclusion health approach, including psychosocial, pharmacological, case management and disease prevention interventions. It also outlines approaches related to housing and social determinants, as well as those tailored to women and young people, highlighting the need to attend to specific needs of those groups most excluded.

Central to the inclusion health approach is the need to involve those who live with inequities, who will put interventions and approaches into context of the lived experience of exclusion. The authors describe implications for service planning and policy development, offering recommendations for public health and primary care practice, research, intervention design and policy development. In particular, they note that addressing the root causes of exclusion due to structural disadvantages of living in recurrent material deprivation and poverty is central to an effective policy response.

Use this resource to:

  • discuss the concept of inclusion health with colleagues as part of a continuing education or professional development activity;
  • sketch a profile of groups and communities that experience exclusion in your area, as well as the social determinants for which they experience the most disadvantage; and
  • develop and propose an inclusion health lens for interventions to address health inequities.

Reference

Luchenski, S., Maguire, N., Aldridge, R.W., Hayward, A., Story, A., Perri, P., Withers, J., Clint, S., Fitzpatrick, S., Hewett, N. (2018). What works in inclusion health: Overview of effective interventions for marginalised and excluded populations. The Lancet;391(10117):266-280.

References

[1] Luchenski, S., Maguire, N., Aldridge, R.W., Hayward, A., Story, A., Perri, P., Withers, J., Clint, S., Fitzpatrick, S., Hewett, N. (2018). What works in inclusion health: Overview of effective interventions for marginalised and excluded populations. The Lancet;391(10117):266-280.

Related resources

Tags: Community engagement, Income inequality, Modify & orient, Link

Association between household food insecurity and mortality in Canada: A population-based retrospect

This resource is available in English only.

According to Toronto-based research project PROOF, income-based household food insecurity affects one in eight households across Canada, negatively impacting physical, mental and social health outcomes across the population. [1]

This journal article from Men, Gunderson, Urquia and Tarasuk presents Canadian data on food insecurity status correlated with rates of premature death in over 510,000 adults. The findings reinforce that income-based household food insecurity is a social determinant of mortality.

Food insecurity related to mortality

The data associates marginal, moderate, and severe food insecurity with higher rates of all-cause mortality for both men and women. Notable findings include that severe food insecurity was associated with higher mortality rates across all conditions (except cancer) and occurrence of death nine years earlier than adults who are food secure. As well, higher rates of death across all levels of food insecurity for avoidable conditions were noted.

Income-based food insecurity

The results also show that adults who have income-based food insecurity do not experience the same benefits from public health disease prevention efforts as those who are food secure. Results related to the relationship between food insecurity and higher rates of unintentional injuries and suicide points to the need for public health investigation and intervention in these areas.

Overall, this research reinforces the need for societal interventions that address material and social deprivation as the basis for risk from disease and mortality, and a necessary area of focus for public health action.

Use this resource to

  • support the need for public health intervention on material and social deprivation to address food insecurity;
  • describe the link between causes of premature death and levels of food insecurity in your community;
  • Identify population groups experiencing food insecurity in your own area by using this article as a frame to analyze local data; and
  • develop a strategy to address material and social deprivation to reduce population level morbidity and mortality risk.

Resource reference

Men, F., Gunderson, C., Urquia, M.L., Tarasuk, V. (2020). Association between household food insecurity and mortality in Canada: A population-based retrospective cohort study. CMAJ;192:E53-60

References

[1] PROOF. PROOF – Research to identify policy options to reduce food insecurity [Internet]. Toronto (ON): University of Toronto; 2017 [cited 2020 May 22]. Available from: http://proof.utoronto.ca/.

Related resources

Tags: Food security, Reporting and measurement, Socioeconomic status , Link

Managing your business during COVID-19

This resource is available in English and French.
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This webpage from the Government of Canada provides links to economic supports for individuals, communities, Indigenous Peoples and multiple sectors for navigating the circumstances related to COVID-19.

 

Reference

Government of Canada. (2020, July 14). Managing your business during COVID-19. https://www.canada.ca/en/services/business/maintaingrowimprovebusiness/resources-for-canadian-businesses.html

Tags: COVID-19, Socioeconomic status , Working conditions, Website

When coronavirus and colonialism collide

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This podcast episode from Media Indigena discusses the intersection of colonialism and structural vulnerability to COVID-19.

 

Reference

Harp, R. (Executive Producer). (2020, March 19). When coronavirus and colonialism collide (Episode 201) [Audio podcast episode]. In Media Indigena. https://mediaindigena.libsyn.com/when-coronavirus-and-colonialism-collide-ep-201

Tags: COVID-19, Indigenous health , Racism/racialization, Podcast

Who’s missing out? COVID-19 supports and benefits rapid analysis

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This report from the Wellesley Institute describes a survey and subsequent analysis of the accessibility of COVID-19 income support programs and benefits.

 

Reference

Elliott, S., Gunaseelan, V., Leon, S., Sathiyamoorthy, T., & McKenzie, K. (2020). Who’s missing out? COVID-19 supports and benefits rapid analysis. Wellesley Institute. https://www.wellesleyinstitute.com/publications/covid-19-supports-and-benefits-rapid-analysis/

Tags: COVID-19, Healthy public policy, Socioeconomic status , Public Health Organization, Report/document

COVID-19: Addressing discrimination and racism: Local health department support guidance

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This brief report from the Berkeley Media Studies Group offers guidelines and suggested public health actions to address discrimination and racism due to COVID-19.

 

Reference

Berkeley Media Studies Group. (2020, March 20). COVID-19: Addressing discrimination and racism: Local health department support guidance. http://www.bmsg.org/resources/publications/covid-19-addressing-discrimination-and-racism-local-health-department-support-guidance/

Tags: COVID-19, Racism/racialization, Stigma, discrimination, Report/document

COVID-19 related resources

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This website repository from the Network for the Advancement of Black Communities offers resources related to housing, education, mental health, and other equity implications of COVID-19 for racialized communities.

 

Reference

Network for the Advancement of Black Communities. (n.d.). COVID-19 related resources. https://networkabc.ca/category/resources/covid/

Tags: COVID-19, Racism/racialization, Socioeconomic status , Public Health Organization, Website

COVID 19 and the disability movement

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This website from the International Disability Alliance offers links to resources addressing the rights of people with disabilities and recommendations for inclusive pandemic response.

The website is available in English only, but a list of key recommendations for a disability-inclusive COVID-19 response is available here in French.

 

Reference

International Disability Alliance. (n.d.). COVID 19 and the disability movement. http://www.internationaldisabilityalliance.org/content/covid-19-and-disability-movement

Tags: Access to health services, COVID-19, Pandemic/emergency planning, Public Health Organization, Website

Disability considerations during the COVID-19 outbreak

This resource is available in English and French. 
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This report from the World Health Organization describes specific considerations for people with disabilities related to infection control measures and access to health services during COVID-19.

 

Reference

World Health Organization. (2020, March 26). Disability considerations during the COVID-19 outbreak. https://www.who.int/publications/i/item/disability-considerations-during-the-covid-19-outbreak

Tags: Access to health services, COVID-19, Stigma, discrimination, Report/document

Disability, urban health equity, and the coronavirus pandemic: Promoting cities for all

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This article by Pineda and Corburn describes the increased health risks of COVID-19 for people with disabilities and considerations for pandemic planning.

 

Reference

Pineda, V.S., & Corburn J. (2020). Disability, urban health equity, and the coronavirus pandemic: Promoting cities for all. Journal of Urban Health, 97, 336–341. https://doi.org/10.1007/s11524-020-00437-7

Tags: Access to health services, COVID-19, Pandemic/emergency planning, Journal article

The psychological impact of quarantine and how to reduce it: Rapid review of the evidence

This resource is available in English only.

The use of quarantine and isolation as methods to contain the spread of Covid-19 has raised questions about the impact of these measures on mental health and psychological wellness. This rapid evidence review synthesizes research on the psychological impacts of quarantine and isolation in previous infectious disease outbreaks (including SARS, Ebola, H1N1 and MERS). It explores the factors that can both contribute to and mitigate the effects on mental health and psychological wellbeing.

Mental health impacts of quarantine

In addition to considering the psychological impact of isolation and pre-quarantine predictive factors, this article outlines factors that impact mental health. This includes the duration of quarantine, fear of infection, frustration, boredom and lack of information.

Post-quarantine stressors include loss of income and the stigma of having experienced the illness. Factors that may mitigate the negative psychological impact include the following:

  • shorter quarantine and isolation times
  • adequate supplies and information
  • reducing boredom
  • communication
  • attention to the particular needs of healthcare workers
  • relating the benefits of isolation to the greater good and health of society

The findings of this rapid review can support public health frontline, policy and decision-makers to provide public guidance about how to manage being in quarantine or isolation.

Use this resource to

  • develop key public communications about mitigating the negative effects of physical distancing and quarantine during a pandemic;
  • inform public health interventions to promote population mental health as part of emergency preparedness and pandemic planning; and
  • identify groups at particular risk of negative psychological impacts of isolation and quarantine and develop strategies to attend to their needs both preventively and acutely.

Reference

Brooks, S.K., Webster, R.K., Smith, L.E., Woodland, L., Wessely, S., Greenburg, N., Rubin, G.J. (2020). The Psychological Impact of Quarantine and How to Reduce It: Rapid Review of the Evidence. The Lancet; 395:912-920. https://www.thelancet.com/journals/lancet/article/PIIS0140-6736(20)30460-8/fulltext

Related resources

Tags: COVID-19, Infectious disease, Mental Health, Link

Why social policies make coronavirus worse

This resource is available in English only.
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This commentary article from Think Global Health describes COVID-19 as a syndemic related to increased chronic disease risk due to inequitable income policies.

 

Reference

Mendenhall, E. (2020, March 27). Why social policies make coronavirus worse. Think Global Health. https://www.thinkglobalhealth.org/article/why-social-policies-make-coronavirus-worse?fbclid=IwAR0-w9B-3Bh77zZmBfaHJdEM9teNbSo7QmtmkIcqATM9FZJz6V4wZ0Kvaoo

Tags: COVID-19, Healthy public policy, Socioeconomic status , Public Health Association, Commentary (media article)

Equitable response community commons

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This resource hub from the Center for Urban and Racial Equity offers a variety of resource types related to financial assistance, working conditions, healthcare access and policy actions for communities most vulnerable to the negative effects of COVID-19.

 

Reference

Center for Urban and Racial Equity. (n.d.). Equitable response community commons. https://urbanandracialequity.org/covid19equitableresponse/

Tags: COVID-19, Racism/racialization, Stigma, discrimination, Public Health Organization, Website

Implications of COVID-19 on at-risk workers by neighborhood in Los Angeles

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This report from Ong, Pech, Gonzalez and Vasquez-Noriega describes the impact of low wages and inadequate working conditions on COVID-19 risk and impact in Los Angeles County, USA.

 

Reference

Ong, P., Pech, C., Gonzalez, S., & Vasquez-Noriega, C. (2020). Implications of COVID-19 on at-risk workers by neighborhood in Los Angeles. UCLA Center for Neighborhood Knowledge. https://knowledge.luskin.ucla.edu/wp-content/uploads/2020/04/LPPI-Implications-from-COVID-19-res2-1.pdf

Tags: COVID-19, Working conditions, Report/document

Perceptions and behavioural responses of the general public during the COVID-19 pandemic: A cross-sectional survey of UK adults

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This article from Atchison et al. describes a UK study that looked at risk perceptions and behavioural responses to inform outcome mapping of COVID-19 infection control strategies.

 

Reference

Atchison, C.J., Bowman, L., Vrinten, C., Redd, R., Pristera, P., Eaton, J.W., & Ward, H. (2020). Perceptions and behavioural responses of the general public during the COVID-19 pandemic: A cross-sectional survey of UK adults. medRxiv. https://doi.org/10.1101/2020.04.01.20050039

Tags: Addressing misinformation , COVID-19, Socioeconomic status , Journal article

Ethics of using restrictive measures in the control of infectious diseases

Ethics of using restrictive measures in the control of infectious diseases

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This webinar recording from the Dalla Lana School of Public Health explores the ethics of developing and applying pandemic control measures during COVID-19.

 

Reference

Dalla Lana School of Public Health. (2020, April 20). Ethics of using restrictive measures in the control of infectious diseases [Video]. YouTube. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=W4rFSzXt4q0&feature=youtu.be

Tags: COVID-19, Pandemic/emergency planning, Webinar

Beyond sex and gender analysis: An intersectional view of the COVID-19 pandemic outbreak and response

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This policy brief from Hankivsky and Kapilashrami describes an intersectional perspective on race, gender, racialization, and other social determinants of health related to COVID-19.

 

Reference

Hankivsky, O., & Kapilashrami, A. (2020, March 31). Beyond sex and gender analysis: An intersectional view of the COVID-19 pandemic outbreak and response. University of Melbourne. https://mspgh.unimelb.edu.au/__data/assets/pdf_file/0011/3334889/Policy-brief_v3.pdf

Tags: COVID-19, Pandemic/emergency planning, Sex & gender, Stigma, discrimination, Policy brief

Beyond sex and gender analysis: An intersectional view of the COVID-19 pandemic outbreak and response

This resource is available in English only.
This Resource Library entry is a stub — a shortened entry. Please visit the resource link directly for more detail.

 

This policy brief from Hankivsky and Kapilashrami describes an intersectional perspective on race, gender, racialization, and other social determinants of health related to COVID-19.

 

Reference

Hankivsky, O., & Kapilashrami, A. (2020, March 31). Beyond sex and gender analysis: An intersectional view of the COVID-19 pandemic outbreak and response. University of Melbourne. https://mspgh.unimelb.edu.au/__data/assets/pdf_file/0011/3334889/Policy-brief_v3.pdf

Tags: COVID-19, Pandemic/emergency planning, Stigma, discrimination, Policy brief

Coronavirus 2019: Reducing stigma

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This website from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) offers information specific to addressing stigma and discrimination due to COVID-19.

 

Reference

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. (2020, June 11). Coronavirus 2019: Reducing stigma. https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/daily-life-coping/reducing-stigma.html

Tags: COVID-19, Stigma, discrimination, Website

COVID-19: A data perspective

This resource is available in English and French.
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This database from Statistics Canada offers data related to equity issues of COVID-19 including food insecurity, Indigeneity and other social determinants of health.

 

Reference

Statistics Canada. (2020, July 9). COVID-19: A data perspectivehttps://www.statcan.gc.ca/eng/covid19?HPA=1

Tags: COVID-19, Food security, Reporting and measurement, Public Health Organization, Data repository

Public health and Covid-19: Shifting to recovery

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This webpage from the Public Health Association of BC offers links to resources, discussions, and consultation opportunities around COVID-19 advocacy and planning.

 

Reference

Public Health Association of British Columbia. (2020, June 1). Public health and Covid-19: Shifting to recovery. https://www.placespeak.com/en/topic/6302-public-health-and-covid-19/

Tags: Access to health services, Community engagement, COVID-19, Public Health Association, Website

Broadbent Institute resources and responses to COVID-19

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This website repository from the Broadbent Institute is a resource-sharing site to support worker and community advocacy for protections during COVID-19 .

 

Reference

Broadbent Institute. (n.d.). Broadbent Institute resources and responses to COVID–19. https://www.broadbentinstitute.ca/covid-19

Tags: Community engagement, COVID-19, Working conditions, Website

Public health emergency preparedness: a framework to promote resilience

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This article from Khan et al. describes a framework for building a resilient public health system for equitable emergency preparedness and response.

 

Reference

Khan Y., et al. (2018). Public health emergency preparedness: a framework to promote resilience. BMC Public Health, 18(1344), 1–16. https://doi.org/10.1186/s12889-018-6250-7

Tags: COVID-19, Pandemic/emergency planning, Reporting and measurement, Journal article

What have we learned about communication inequalities during the H1N1 pandemic: A systematic review

This resource is available in English only. 
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This 2014 journal article from Lin et al. describes the literature and knowledge around how the social determinants of health are associated with communication inequalities in pandemic planning and response.

 

Reference

Lin, L., Savoia, E., Agboola, F., & Viswanath, K. (2014). What have we learned about communication inequalities during the H1N1 pandemic: A systematic review of the literature. BMC Public Health, 14(1). https://doi.org/10.1186/1471-2458-14-484

Tags: Communicate, COVID-19, Pandemic/emergency planning, Journal article

Responding to COVID-19: How to navigate a public health emergency legally and ethically

This resource is available in English only. 
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This commentary article from The Hastings Center describes the ethical and legal dimensions of healthcare service provision during COVID-19.

 

Reference

Gostin, L., Friedman, E., & Wetter, S. (2020). Responding to COVID-19: How to navigate a public health emergency legally and ethically. Hastings Center Report, 50(2), 8–12. doi: 10.1002/hast.1090 

Tags: Access to health services, COVID-19, Commentary (media article)

Coronavirus disease (COVID-19): Vulnerable populations and COVID-19

This resource is available in English and French. 
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This document from the Public Health Agency of Canada describes populations that are most at-risk of contracting COVID-19 and how to address inequities.

 

Reference

Public Health Agency of Canada. (2020). Coronavirus disease (COVID-19): Vulnerable populations and COVID-19. Government of Canada. https://www.canada.ca/en/public-health/services/publications/diseases-conditions/vulnerable-populations-covid-19.html

Tags: Communicate, COVID-19, Socioeconomic status , Public Health Agency of Canada, Report/document

What have we learned about communication inequalities during the H1N1 pandemic: A systematic review of the literature

This resource is available in English only.
This Resource Library entry is a stub — a shortened entry. Please visit the resource link directly for more detail.

 

This article from Lin, Savoia, Agboola and Viswanath discusses the communication inequities that were present during the H1N1 pandemic. It also offers lessons learned for public health during this previous event.

 

Reference

Lin, L., Savoia, E., Agboola, F., & Viswanath, K. (2014). What have we learned about communication inequalities during the H1N1 pandemic: A systematic review of the literature. BMC Public Health, 14(484), 1–13. https://doi.org/10.1186/1471-2458-14-484

Tags: Addressing misinformation , COVID-19, Pandemic/emergency planning, Journal article

The psychological impact of quarantine and how to reduce it: Rapid review of the evidence

This resource is available in English only.
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This article from Brooks et al. discusses the psychological impacts of quarantine and how to reduce them.

 

Reference

Brooks, S.K., Webster, R.K., Smith, L.E., Woodland, L., Wessley, S., Greenberg, N., et al. (2020). The psychological impact of quarantine and how to reduce it: Rapid review of the evidence. Lancet, 395(10227), 912–920. https://doi.org/10.1016/S0140-6736(20)30460-8

Tags: COVID-19, Mental Health, Pandemic/emergency planning, Journal article

Social stigma associated with COVID-19

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This report from the China International Famine Relief Commission (CIFRC), United Nations International Child Education Fund (UNICEF) and the World Health Organization (WHO) discusses ways to prevent and address the social stigma that is associated with COVID-19.

 

Reference

China International Famine Relief Commission, United Nations International Child Education Fund, World Health Organization. (2020). Social stigma associated with COVID-19. https://www.unicef.org/documents/social-stigma-associated-coronavirus-disease-covid-19

Tags: COVID-19, Racism/racialization, Stigma, discrimination, Public Health Organization, Report/document

Infectious questions: Addressing issues of stigma and discrimination for 2019-nCoV (2019-nCoV, Pt 4)

This resource is available in English only. A French-language translation of the transcription is available here.
This Resource Library entry is a stub — a shortened entry. Please visit the resource link directly for more detail.

 

This podcast episode from the National Collaborating Centre for Infectious Diseases discusses the issues of stigma and discrimination in relation to COVID-19. It also offers options for a public health response.

The episode was recorded in English. A French-language translation of the transcription is available here.

 

Reference

Balakumar, S., & Davis, C. (Executive Producers). (2020, February 21). Infectious questions: Addressing issues of stigma and discrimination for 2019-nCoV (2019-nCoV, Pt 4) (Episode 4) [Audio podcast episode]. In Infectious questions: What health professionals need to know about 2019-nCoV and COVID-19. National Collaborating Centre for Infectious Diseases. https://nccid.ca/podcast-2019-ncov/#subMenuSection11

Tags: COVID-19, Infectious disease, Stigma, discrimination, Public Health Organization, Podcast

Statement on the COVID-19 emergency and its impacts on Indigenous Peoples and peoples of colour

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This statement from Colour of Poverty – Colour of Change describes the impact of COVID-19 on Indigenous Peoples and people of colour.

 

Reference

Colour of Poverty – Colour of Change steering committee members. (n.d.). Statement on the COVID-19 emergency and its impacts on Indigenous Peoples and peoples of colour. Colour of Poverty – Colour of Change. https://www.halco.org/wp-content/uploads/2020/03/Colour-of-Poverty-Statement-on-COVID-19-.pdf

Tags: COVID-19, Racism/racialization, Stigma, discrimination, Report/document

Stigma, discrimination, health impacts and COVID-19

This resource is available in English and French.
This Resource Library entry is a stub — a shortened entry. Please visit the resource link directly for more detail.

 

This blog post from Pemma Muzumdar discusses COVID-19 and the existing health impacts of stigma and discrimination.

 

Reference

Muzumdar, P. (2020, March 16). Stigma, discrimination, health impacts and COVID-19 [Blog post]. National Collaborating Centre for Determinants of Health. https://nccdh.ca/index.php?/blog/entry/stigma-discrimination-health-impacts-and-covid-19

Tags: COVID-19, Racism/racialization, Stigma, discrimination, National Collaborating Centre for Determinants of Health, Commentary (media article)

COVID-19 and Indigenous communities: Family conversations

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This commentary from Alika Lafontaine discusses the unique impact of COVID-19 on Indigenous communities.

 

Reference

Lafontaine, A. (2020, March 16). COVID-19 and Indigenous communities: Family conversations [Blog post]. Yellowhead Institute. https://yellowheadinstitute.org/2020/03/16/covid-19-indigenous-communities/

Tags: Communicate, COVID-19, Indigenous health , Commentary (media article)

Infectious questions: What health professionals need to know about 2019-nCoV and COVID-19

This resource is available in English only, though the French translations of the transcriptions are available at the bottom of the resource page.
This Resource Library entry is a stub — a shortened entry. Please visit the resource link directly for more detail.

 

This podcast series from the National Collaborating Centre for Infectious Diseases looks at pandemic preparedness for COVID-19. It includes episodes on Indigenous communities and other populations at risk.

Episodes are recorded in English, with French-language translations of episode transcriptions available at the bottom of the page. Translations are available for episodes 1 through 10, with the translations of remaining episode transcriptions forthcoming.

 

Reference

Balakumar, S., & Davis, C. (Executive Producer). (2020–Present). Infectious questions: What health professionals need to know about 2019-nCoV and COVID-19 [Audio podcast]. National Collaborating Centre for Infectious Diseases. https://nccid.ca/podcast-2019-ncov

Tags: COVID-19, Pandemic/emergency planning, Public Health Organization, Podcast

Coronavirus (COVID-19) and Indigenous communities

This resource is available in English and French.
This Resource Library entry is a stub — a shortened entry. Please visit the resource link directly for more detail.

 

This webpage from the Government of Canada describes Canada's federal-level support in addressing COVID-19 within Indigenous communities.

 

Reference

Government of Canada. (2020, July 13). Coronavirus (COVID-19) and Indigenous communities. https://www.sac-isc.gc.ca/eng/1581964230816/1581964277298

Tags: COVID-19, Indigenous health , Reporting and measurement, Website

Coronavirus and the HCH community: Status updates, available guidance, local preparations, and outstanding issues

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This webinar recording from the National Health Care for the Homeless Council explores the impact of COVID-19 on populations experiencing homelessness. It also offers guidance for those addressing the pandemic in homeless shelters.

 

Reference

National Health Care for the Homeless Council. (2020, March 23). Coronavirus and the HCH community: Status updates, available guidance, local preparations, and outstanding issues. https://nhchc.org/webinars/coronavirus-and-the-hch-community-status-updates-available-guidance-local-preparations-and-outstanding-issues/

Tags: COVID-19, Housing, Pandemic/emergency planning, Webinar

Interim guidance for homeless service providers to plan and respond to coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19)

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This document from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) offers guidance for planning for and responding to COVID-19 in homeless shelters.

 

Reference

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. (2020, May 19). Interim guidance for homeless service providers to plan and respond to coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/community/homeless-shelters/plan-prepare-respond.html

Tags: COVID-19, Housing, Pandemic/emergency planning, Report/document

Pandemic planning and services that support people who are homeless

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This commentary article from Iain De Jong describes COVID-19-related planning and services to support people who live with homelessness.

 

Reference

De Jong, I. (2020, March 1). Pandemic planning and services that support people who are homeless. OrgCode. https://www.orgcode.com/pandemic_planning_and_services_that_support_people_who_are_homeless

Tags: COVID-19, Housing, Pandemic/emergency planning, Commentary (media article)

Coronavirus resources for the homelessness section

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This webpage from the Canadian Alliance to Prevent Homelessness provides links to resources for those working in the homelessness sector on addressing the risks and impacts of COVID-19.

 

Reference

The Canadian Alliance to End Homelessness. (2020, March 5). Coronavirus resources for the homelessness section. The Canadian Alliance to End Homelessness. https://caeh.ca/coronavirus-resources/

Tags: COVID-19, Housing, Pandemic/emergency planning, Website

2019 Novel Coronavirus (COVID-19) Interim guidance for homelessness service settings providers

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This document from Toronto Public Health provides information to homelessness service setting providers and workers to reduce risk of COVID-19 and how to plan around COVID-19.

 

Reference

Toronto Public Health. (2020). 2019 Novel Coronavirus (COVID-19) Interim guidance for homelessness service settings providers. https://tdin.ca/ann_documents/2020-03-10%20Interim-Guidance-for-Homelessness-Service-Settings-Providers%20....pdf

Tags: COVID-19, Housing, Pandemic/emergency planning, Report/document

Infection prevention and control guide for homelessness service settings

This resource is available in English only.
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This report from Toronto Public Health provides recommendations for homelessness service providers and workers on infection and prevention control measures.

 

Reference

Toronto Public Health. (2019). Infection prevention and control guide for homelessness service settings. https://www.toronto.ca/community-people/health-wellness-care/health-info-for-specific-audiences/infection-prevention-and-control-guide-for-homelessness-service-settings/

Tags: COVID-19, Housing, Infectious disease, Report/document

COVID-19: The gendered impacts of the outbreak

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This article from Wenham, Smith and Morgan describes the gendered impacts of COVID-19. It describes how to avoid reproducing or perpetuating gender and health inequities through the public health response to the pandemic.

 

Reference

Wenham, C., Smith, J., & Morgan, R., on behalf of the Gender and COVID-19 Working Group. (2020). COVID-19: The gendered impacts of the outbreak. Lancet, 395(10227), 846–848. https://doi.org/10.1016/S0140-6736(20)30526-2

Tags: COVID-19, Sex & gender, Stigma, discrimination, Journal article

Take action on income supports

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This webpage from the Broadbent Institute describes various federal policy changes that would financially support workers impacted by COVID-19.

 

Reference

Broadbent Institute. (2020, March 16). Take action on income supports. https://www.broadbentinstitute.ca/take_action_on_income_supports

Tags: Healthy public policy, Working conditions, Policy brief

Canadian workforce unevenly protected from COVID-19

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This report from the Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives describes how the lack of policy protections for some workers result in a disproportionate negative impact of COVID-19.

 

Reference

Macdonald, D. (2020, March 16). Canadian workforce unevenly protected from COVID-19. Behind the Numbers, Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives. http://behindthenumbers.ca/2020/03/16/canadian-workforce-unevenly-protected-from-covid-19/

Tags: COVID-19, Healthy public policy, Working conditions, Report/document

We need to urgently consider equity in our coronavirus response

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This commentary from Kwame McKenzie describes the need to consider equity when developing COVID-19 policy responses.

 

Reference

McKenzie, K. (2020, March). We need to urgently consider equity in our coronavirus response. The Toronto Star. https://www.thestar.com/opinion/contributors/2020/03/16/we-need-to-urgently-consider-equity-in-our-coronavirus-response.html

Tags: COVID-19, Healthy public policy, Socioeconomic status , Commentary (media article)

As coronavirus deepens inequality, inequality worsens its spread

This resource is available in English only.
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This commentary from Fisher and Bubola describes worsening inequities of the pandemic and the spread of COVID-19 amongst those most at risk.

 

Reference

Fisher, M., & Bubola, E. (2020, March). As coronavirus deepens inequality, inequality worsens its spread. The New York Times. https://www.nytimes.com/2020/03/15/world/europe/coronavirus-inequality.html

Tags: COVID-19, Socioeconomic status , Working conditions, Commentary (media article)

Revisiting public health preparedness: Incorporating social justice principles into pandemic preparedness planning for influenza

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This article from Kayman and Ablorh-Odjidja looks at the history of public health and social justice in the context of emergency preparedness.

 

Reference

Kayman, H., & Ablorh-Odjidja, A. (2006). Revisiting public health preparedness: Incorporating social justice principles into pandemic preparedness planning for influenza. Journal of Public Health Management and Practice, 12(4), 373–380. https://journals.lww.com/jphmp/fulltext/2006/07000/revisiting_public_health_preparedness_.11.aspx

Tags: COVID-19, Intersectoral action, Pandemic/emergency planning, Journal article

Pandemics and health equity: Lessons learned from the H1N1 response in Los Angeles County

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This article from Plough, Bristow, Fielding, Caldwell and Khan looks at emergency preparedness during pandemics and how health equity should be addressed.

 

Reference

Plough, A., Bristow, B., Fielding, J., Caldwell, S., & Khan, S. (2011). Pandemics and health equity: Lessons learned from the H1N1 response in Los Angeles County. Journal of Public Health Management and Practice, 17(1), 20–27. https://doi.org/10.1097/PHH.0b013e3181ff2ad7

Tags: COVID-19, Pandemic/emergency planning, Racism/racialization, Journal article

Social justice in pandemic preparedness

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This article from DeBruin, Liaschenko and Marshall looks at implementing a social justice approach to pandemic planning.

 

Reference

DeBruin, D., Liaschenko, J., & Marshall, M.F. (2012). Social justice in pandemic preparedness. American Journal of Public Health, 102(4), 586–591. https://doi.org/10.2105/AJPH.2011.300483

Tags: COVID-19, Intersectoral action, Pandemic/emergency planning, Journal article

Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19)

This resource is available in English only.
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This webpage from the government of King County (Washington State, USA) provides multilingual information on COVID-19 and how it impacts different aspects of society.

 

Reference

King County. (2020, June 9). Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). https://kingcounty.gov/depts/health/covid-19.aspx

Tags: Communicate, COVID-19, Multilingual information, Website

Novel coronavirus (COVID-19) general information

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This webpage from the Washington State Department of Health provides a variety of general information regarding COVID-19. The information is in the form of fact sheets and available in a multitude of languages (English, Arabic, Chinese, Simplified Chinese, Korean, Marshallese, Russian, Spanish, Somali, Tagalog, Vietnamese).

 

Reference

Washington State Department of Health. (n.d.). Novel coronavirus (COVID-19) general information. https://www.doh.wa.gov/Emergencies/NovelCoronavirusOutbreak2020/FactSheet

Tags: Communicate, COVID-19, Multilingual information, Fact sheet, Website

COVID-19 educational materials – 26+ languages

This website is available in English, with some resources available in French.
This Resource Library entry is a stub — a shortened entry. Please visit the resource link directly for more detail.

 

This webpage from the Washington State Department of Health provides COVID-19 educational materials in a wide variety of languages.

The following resources are available in French:

 

Reference

Washington State Department of Health. (n.d.). COVID-19 educational materials – 26+ languages. https://www.doh.wa.gov/Emergencies/NovelCoronavirusOutbreak2020/HealthEducation

Tags: Communicate, COVID-19, Multilingual information, Public Health Organization, Website

How Ontario is responding to COVID-19

This resource is available in English and French. 
This Resource Library entry is a stub — a shortened entry. Please visit the resource link directly for more detail.

 

This webpage from the Government of Ontario describes the different ways the province is responding to COVID-19.

 

Reference

Government of Ontario. (2020, July 13). How Ontario is responding to COVID-19. https://www.ontario.ca/page/how-ontario-is-responding-covid-19

Tags: Communicate, COVID-19, Reporting and measurement, Website

Let’s Talk: Ethical foundations of health equity

This resource is also available in French.

The Let’s Talk document explores  justice as the ethical basis of health equity. It expands upon this idea by exploring how public health practitioners can use this knowledge to guide work to address health equity.

Distributive justice

The authors discuss two broad dimensions of distributive justice: the currency of justice and the principles of justice.

The currency of justice is described as access to services, resources that promote health, opportunities to be healthy and health outcomes. The principles of justice guide the distribution of the currency of justice in public health interventions and include principles of equality, sufficiency, priority to the worse off and maximization of the currencies across the population.

The resource also provides examples to demonstrate how the principles intersect with the currencies of justice are provided, as well as how these intersections can guide public health decision-making and resulting population health outcomes. A specific example of how ethical judgements can affect the design of diabetes interventions is outlined as an example to guide application across public health program and topic areas.

Discussion questions

The document includes four discussion questions to encourage critical thinking and conversation about the ethical foundations of health equity and the selection of public health approaches to address it.

This document has a companion document titled Ethical foundations of health equity: A curated list. The reading list includes resources discussing theoretical contributions to the ethics of health equity work, as well as considerations and implications for practice that arise from these theories.

Use this resource to:

  • critically examine what you think makes a difference in health unjust and how this affects the strategies you propose to address health equity;
  • facilitate organizational and team discussions about the ethical foundations of health equity; and
  • incorporate ethical considerations into strategic directions and program plans to influence decision-making to address health inequities.

Reference

National Collaborating Centre for Determinants of Health. Let’s Talk: Ethical Foundations of Health Equity. (2020). Antigonish, NS: NCCDH, St. Francis Xavier University.

Related resources

Tags: National Collaborating Centre for Determinants of Health, Report/document

Ethical foundations of health equity: A curated list

This resource is also available in French.

This curated reading list is designed to help public health practitioners bolster their understanding of ethical foundations and considerations of health equity.

The resource is organized into the following five categories:

  1. Prominent theories of justice in public health contains books representing philosophical contributions that support social justice as the basis for public health work.
  2. Advancing the concept of justice in public health practice explores how concepts in social justice including values, political philosophy and social injustice should be considered in the context of public health.
  3. Key related concepts and considerations discusses additional concepts relevant to social justice such as intersectionality, Indigenous health and feminist ethics.
  4. The section on public health competencies discusses how determinants of health and equity are integrated in core competencies, including social justice and issues that are central to Indigenous Peoples
  5. Practice tools and perspectives features resources from the National Collaborating Centre for Healthy Public Policy and the National Association of County and City Health Officials that examine social justice and health equity in public health policy and practice.

Ethical foundations of health equity: A curated list has been developed alongside Let’s Talk: Ethical foundations of health equity, part of our Let’s Talk series. The companion document discusses ethical implications and concepts of justice in decision-making related to public health interventions to improve health equity.

Reference

National Collaborating Centre for Determinants of Health. Ethical foundations of Health Equity: A Curated List. (2020). Antigonish, NS: NCCDH, St. Francis Xavier University.

Related resources

Tags: Communicate, Competencies & organizational standards , Intersectoral action, Key concepts, Racism/racialization, Reading list, National Collaborating Centre for Determinants of Health, Report/document

Let’s Talk: Values and health equity

This product is in the final stages of production. Please check back soon.

This resource is also available in French.

This Let’s Talk document positions values as structural drivers of health equity, influencing priorities and action and at the individual, organizational and societal levels.

It includes a new framework that names the values most necessary for health equity–oriented public health practice. These values include behaviours (e.g., fairness, solidarity, courage) and end states (e.g., health equity and a dignified life, social justice). The values are then connected to policy and program approaches (e.g., cultural safety, racial equity) that could be applied in public health practice and across the larger health system.

The resource also explores health equity practice tensions that often arise in health equity practice tensions in relation to two larger societal tensions:

  1. A readiness for change versus a desire to keep things the way they are
  2. Wanting the well-being of others versus wanting success and power for oneself

Finally, the author identifies several opportunities for values to drive a culture of health equity and, by extension, public health and health equity action. 

Use this resource to:

  • describe key concepts related to values and health equity;
  • begin conversations with colleagues about values that support health equity;
  • identify opportunities for values to drive policy and program approaches for health equity; and
  • support strategic planning and visioning processes within public health organizations.

Reference

National Collaborating Centre for Determinants of Health. (2020). Let’s Talk: Values and Health Equity. Antigonish, NS: NCCDH, St. Francis Xavier University.

Related resources:

Tags: National Collaborating Centre for Determinants of Health, Report/document

A guide to assessment tools for organizational health equity capacity

This product is in the final stages of production. Please check back soon.

This resource is also available in French.

This guide to assessment tools for organizational health equity capacity describes tools to assess capacity to help public health organizations select a tool (or elements of tools) that best fits their own organizational context.

It is based on a literature scan and learning circle process that includes members and organizations with expertise in this area, specifically including those that have worked to develop organizational capacity for Indigenous cultural safety.

Tools were assessed for inclusion in this guide according to the two broad criteria of general practicality and applicability to Canadian public health work. We also considered themes related to health equity and the social determinants of health.

Criteria for tool selection

Nine tools were selected for inclusion and are summarized according to the following criteria:

  • What is the purpose of the tool?
  • Definition of (equity) health
  • Focus on the social determinants of health
  • For whom is the tool designed?
  • What is being assessed?
  • What does the tool say about use of the findings?
  • How/where has the tool been applied?

With regard to successful organizational assessments, the following supports were identified as being necessary for health equity action:

  • Clear organizational readiness
  • Strong organizational leadership
  • Appropriate resource allocation
  • Meaningful participation across all levels of the organization
  • Opportunities for intersectoral collaboration
  • Adequate practitioner competence

The guide is a part of a series of knowledge products to be written to support the OCI, which is the second iteration of the NCCDH’s Learning Together series. The first Learning Together series offered resources related to population health status reporting and was released in 2012.

Use this resource to: 

  • establish a baseline for health equity capacity of your organization;
  • use your established baseline to measure progress of implemented change in future evaluations;
  • identify elements of organizational capacity to be improved;
  • incorporate changes deemed necessary into strategic and operational planning; and
  • build cohesiveness within your team through conversation about the strengths and weaknesses of current approaches to strengthening organization-level capacity for health equity action.

Reference 

National Collaborating Centre for Determinants of Health. (2020). A Guide to Assessment Tools for Organizational Health Equity Capacity. Antigonish, NS: NCCDH, St. Francis Xavier University.

Related resources

Tags: Assess and report, Competencies & organizational standards , Leadership & capacity building, National Collaborating Centre for Determinants of Health, Report/document

Building change collectively to support organizational health equity capacity

This resource is also available in French.

A model for successful organizational change

Based on literature and learning circle discussions, this document focuses on the concept of collectively built change processes. While there is a focus on health equity capacity, the content of the document is applicable to collectively built organizational change of any kind.

A learning circle process identified support from senior leaders in the form of early and sustained engagement, followed by continued buy-in and commitment, as necessary for successful organizational change. Further, learning circle members noted that organizations wishing to increase health equity capacity should:

  • incorporate health equity priorities in all areas of organization-level strategies;
  • allocate time and resources to capacity-building;
  • develop strong internal and external relationships;
  • create a collective understanding of health equity concepts; and
  • measure the impact of change. 

Important role of middle management

This document describes the importance of moving away from top-down directives, encouraging organizations to invest into models centered in collaboration from a variety of sources across all organizational levels.

Middle managers are described as being in a unique position to communicate laterally as well as vertically within an organization. They also have an essential role in strategic, administrative, leadership, decision-making and communication roles.

Understanding individual and organizational context for change is noted as necessary to effectively lead change on an organizational level. The resource also explores the necessity of support from senior management in the form of ongoing engagement, as well as for clear communication around all aspects of the desired change.

Discussion guide

The included discussion guide will help organizations thoughtfully incorporate strategies to improve capacity for health equity through organizational processes.

This document is part of a series of knowledge products to be written to support the OCI, which is the second iteration of the NCCDH’s Learning Together series. The first Learning Together series offered resources related to population health status reporting and was released in 2012.

Use this resource to

  • discuss with middle and senior management what actionable approaches can be taken to be successful with collective organizational change;
  • embed health equity action in all processes and strategies within your organization; and
  • support middle management in implementation of organizational changes through development of quality improvement goals.

Reference

National Collaborating Centre for Determinants of Health. (2020). Building Change Collectively to Support Organizational Health Equity Capacity. Antigonish, NS: NCCDH, St. Francis Xavier University.

Related resources

Tags: Competencies & organizational standards , Leadership & capacity building, Organizational Capacity Initiative (OCI), National Collaborating Centre for Determinants of Health, Report/document

Public health action to address tuberculosis in homeless shelter settings: A curated list

This resource is also available in French.

Tuberculosis (TB) is a public health issue in Canada. While there is currently Canadian guidance on TB prevention and control through various public health programs and settings, there is often a lack of information for a wider determinants or equity-based approach to addressing TB in homeless shelters as the primary public health setting.

Shelters as a catalyst for tuberculosis (TB)

Temporary housing shelters are a place where homeless and street-involved populations live in communal and transient environments. Because of this, shelters are also a setting where public health needs to attend to the role to address TB transmission risk and control, as well as the health inequities that homeless populations experience.

The NCCDH and National Collaborating Centre for Infectious Diseases (NCCID) have produced this curated resource list to support public health TB programs to develop policy and interventions on TB prevention and control. The resources in this list specifically apply to public health TB action in emergency and short-term group housing shelter settings.

This list includes resources that provide general guidance for TB prevention and elimination efforts in Canada as well as Canadian and international guidance and recommendations to public health TB programs working in urban homeless shelter settings. The list also includes case examples of promising TB elimination initiatives in shelter settings and highlights several key TB resource repositories and their contents related to addressing TB in emergency and short-term housing shelters.

Use this resource to:

  • facilitate discussion about public health planning to address TB risk and management in emergency and short-term housing shelters;
  • support collaboration between public health, shelter staff and community organizations that work with communities experiencing homelessness and health inequities; and
  • develop a process to improve follow-up with shelter residents after they leave that setting, which will improve maintenance of necessary interventions and address the root causes of the inequities they face.

Reference

National Collaborating Centre for Determinants of Health and National Collaborating Centre for Infectious Diseases. (2020). Public Health Action on Tuberculosis in Homeless Shelters: A Curated List. Antigonish, NS: National Collaborating Centre for Determinants of Health, St. Francis Xavier University; Winnipeg, MB: National Collaborating Centre for Infectious Disease, University of Manitoba.

Related resources

Tags: Housing, Infectious disease, Modify & orient, National Collaborating Centre for Determinants of Health, Report/document

A model for increasing organizational change capacity for health equity

This resource is also available in French.

A model for successful organizational change

Based on literature and learning circle discussions, this document identifies four concepts that contribute to successful change initiatives:

  1. What they want to change (content)
  2. How change will be enacted (process)
  3. The internal and external conditions that influence change (context)
  4. How emerging knowledge and opportunities will be built into the organization (learning)

In addition to these four concepts, this document describes other factors that influence organizational change capacity such as flexibility in the organizational structure, if and how staff perceive value in the proposed change and staff commitment to the organization overall.

Organizational strategies

The document conveys that strategies such as incorporating incremental change, collective staff dialogue, clear communication and bringing partners on board will increase the likelihood of success in achieving long-lasting and effective change. Established engagement in organizational learning and process improvement are also named as indicators for greater chances of successfully implementing change.

Factors that can hinder the organizational integration of equity as a priority area for action to successful change efforts are highlighted, including colonial institutional practices and the resulting propensity for decision-makers to limit leadership by people experiencing social and structural disadvantage. These factors can hinder the organizational integration of equity as a priority area for action.

Discussion guide

A discussion guide based on the four concepts that contribute to successful change is included to help organizations explore their readiness to adapt to change and bring equity into their everyday practice.

The practice framework is part of a series of knowledge products to be written to support the OCI, which is the second iteration of the NCCDH’s Learning Together series. The first Learning Together series offered resources related to population health status reporting and was released in 2012.

Use this resource to

  • facilitate a discussion with your team about changes currently happening in your organization and how these influence action on health equity;
  • identify obstacles to successful change for your organization and how these influence action on health equity; and
  • develop a plan to address barriers and enhance supports for key concepts that contribute to successful change.

Reference

National Collaborating Centre for Determinants of Health. (2020). A Model for Increasing Organizational Change Capacity for Health Equity. Antigonish, NS: NCCDH, St. Francis Xavier University.

Related resources

Tags: Competencies & organizational standards , Leadership & capacity building, Learning Together, Methods & tools, Organizational Capacity Initiative (OCI), Racism/racialization, National Collaborating Centre for Determinants of Health, Report/document

A practice framework for building organizational capacity for health equity

This resource is also available in French.

Increasing capacity to incorporate health equity

Drawing on literature on existing frameworks, learning circle discussions and interventions at practitioner, organization and system levels, this document describes a framework consisting of eight interrelated components:

  • Lead and govern with equity
  • Develop a culture of equity
  • Fund health equity programs and policies
  • Build a robust and competent team
  • Generate and use knowledge and information to drive equity
  • Build multisectoral and community relationships to enhance action on the SDH
  • Design equitable infrastructure and spaces
  • Systems boundaries and size.

This resource explores how social and political contexts outside of the organization, including societal norms and government infrastructure, generate, influence and shape health inequities and an organization’s capacity to address them. This framework guides the reader through nuanced considerations for incorporating equity-focused approaches into new and existing processes.

The framework also builds on knowledge of how organizations change while considering complexities, context, existing processes and desired outcomes.  

Learning Together series

The practice framework is part of a series of knowledge products to be written to support the OCI, which is the second iteration of the NCCDH’s Learning Together series. The first Learning Together series offered resources related to population health status reporting and was released in 2012.

Use this resource to

  • identify areas where your organization needs to build capacity for action on health equity;
  • develop a plan to increase capacity for health equity action at practitioner, organization and system levels; and
  • learn more about changing interconnected elements within your organization.

Reference

National Collaborating Centre for Determinants of Health. (2020). A Practice Framework for Building Organizational Capacity for Health Equity. Antigonish, NS: NCCDH, St. Francis Xavier University.

Related resources

Tags: Leadership & capacity building, Learning Together, Methods & tools, Organizational Capacity Initiative (OCI), National Collaborating Centre for Determinants of Health, Report/document

Climate change, health equity and public health responses: A curated list

This resource is also available in French.

The National Collaborating Centre for Determinants of Health (NCCDH) has compiled this list of resources to increase understanding of climate change as an urgent public health issue. The document is also meant to help situate climate change and health equity as being inextricably linked and support emerging public health practice in this area.

The selected resources have been organized into three categories:  

  • Climate change and public health
  • Climate change and health equity
  • Opportunities for equity-focused public health action

Use these resources to:  

  • reflect on what a changing climate means for human health;
  • understand how climate change exacerbates existing health inequities;
  • facilitate discussions about the extent to which health equity is considered within your organization’s current actions to address climate change; and
  • identify opportunities to further centre equity in public health responses to climate change.

Citation

National Collaborating Centre for Determinants of Health. (2019). Climate Change, Health Equity and Public Health Responses: A Curated List. Antigonish, NS: NCCDH, St. Francis Xavier University.

Tags: Climate change, Reading list, National Collaborating Centre for Determinants of Health, Report/document

Addressing stigma: Towards a more inclusive health system

This resource is also available in French.

In December 2019, Chief Public Health Officer (CPHO) Dr. Theresa Tam released a national report that shines a light on stigma as a key driver of health inequities in Canada. This report takes the position that “stigma affects us all. We are all vulnerable to the slow and insidious practice of dehumanizing others and we are all responsible for recognizing and stopping it” (p. 5).

The report was informed by meetings with key people across Canada that gathered input on two key questions:

  • What holds stigma in place?
  • How do we address stigma in the health system? 

The report also highlights the health status of people in Canada and points to concerning public health trends as well as several growing health inequities (Chapter 1).

Stigma Pathways to Health Outcomes Model

The Stigma Pathways to Health Outcomes Model (Chapter 2) positions stigma as a public health issue, undermining health for individuals and contributing to population health inequities. The model provides a tool to consider the ways in which different stigmas intersect and lead to worse outcomes for some people. It supports efforts to address and resist the impact of stigma on health.

The model highlights the dimensions of stigma — drivers, types, practices, experiences and population outcomes. Using this model, the report describes the pathways of seven particular stigmas including:

  • racism experienced by First Nations, Inuit and Métis peoples;
  • racism experienced by African, Caribbean and Black Canadians;
  • sexual and gender identity stigma as experienced by LGBTQ2+ people;
  • mental illness stigma;
  • HIV stigma;
  • substance use stigma; and
  • obesity stigma.

Action Framework for Building an Inclusive Health System

An Action Framework for Building an Inclusive Health System (p.41) (Chapter 3) (also available in an infographic) identifies how stigma operates and provides examples of interventions and promising initiatives to address stigma across individual, interpersonal, institutional and population levels.

Considering stigma at each of these levels adds to our understanding of the issue of stigma and its effects on health. It also provides guidance to develop and implement interventions at a variety of levels.

Use this resource to:

  • facilitate a discussion about the dimensions of stigma and the experience of stigma at multiple levels;
  • identify ways in which different stigmas intersect and lead to worse outcomes for groups who experience inequities;
  • apply the action framework and guidance for practice to public health policy and program development that addresses the social determinants of health, and health equity; and
  • design related continuing professional development opportunities for your team.

Reference

Public Health Agency of Canada. (2019). The Chief Public Health Officer's Report on the State of Public Health in Canada 2019: Addressing Stigma Towards a More Inclusive Health System. Ottawa, ON: PHAC. Available from: https://www.canada.ca/content/dam/phac-aspc/documents/corporate/publications/chief-public-health-officer-reports-state-public-health-canada/addressing-stigma-what-we-heard/stigma-eng.pdf.

Related resources

Tags: Assess and report, Community engagement, Key concepts, Modify & orient, Racism/racialization, Public Health Organization, Link

Tenfold podcast

This resource is available in English only.

Engaging with communities that have lived expertise of inequities is considered an essential strategy to inform public health and community action to address the social determinants of health and health inequities.

Practitioners from diverse backgrounds and professional orientations each bring different strategies that inform how engagement can be done beyond seeing the community as a target for service delivery; instead, the goal is to see such groups as a resource to inform how programs and services can be developed to meet the particular needs of the community being reached.

Podcast series

The Tenfold podcast series is an initiative of the Public Health Training for Equitable Systems Change (PHESC) collaborative project, which seeks to develop strategies to strengthen public health staff knowledge and skills to address health equity.

The podcast is hosted by Andrea Bodkin and includes 10 individual episodes ranging in length from approximately 10 to 30 minutes. Each episode discusses a particular aspect of community engagement and its application to public health action on health inequities.

Topics include:

  • the basics of meaningful engagement;
  • the intersection of knowledge translation with engagement;
  • engaging with Indigenous communities;
  • organizational capacity for authentic engagement;
  • power dynamics;
  • community advisory boards; and
  • practical considerations for communities with lived expertise of inequities to inform program and resource priorities of public health.

Listeners can subscribe to the PHESC in Focus newsletter to be notified when a new episode is released.

Episode notes are added as each podcast is published, describing the focus of the podcast episode and the guest being interviewed, and which may also include links to additional resources related to the focus of that particular episode.

The podcast can be played using multiple streaming services, including Apple Podcast, Spotify, Google Podcast, Stitcher and TuneIn.

Click here to learn about the NCCDH’s own contributions to PHESC training.

Use this resource to:

  • facilitate discussion about essential components of authentic community engagement to address health inequities;
  • integrate engagement strategies into program and resource prioritization frameworks and plans; and
  • develop practice culture that considers community members as experts and leaders in addressing health inequities.

Reference

Public Health Training for Equitable Systems Change (Producer). (2019, September 20). Welcome to Tenfold! [Audio podcast]. Retrieved from: http://phesc.ca/podcast

Related resources

Tags: Community engagement, Knowledge translation , Public Health Organization, Link

Peer engagement principles and best practices: A guide for BC health authorities and other providers

This resource is available in English only

When making research and practice decisions regarding people experiencing substance-use related harms, engaging those with lived experience is crucial – especially when addressing health inequities among these communities.

The notion of peer engagement is based on the philosophy that “peers are the experts in their own experience and provide important perspectives and a reality check.” Peer engagement allows for the depth of insight and perspective on solutions that can only come from having the lived expertise of the physical and social conditions that contribute to substance use–related harms. Understanding peer engagement is necessary for public health to build meaningful relationships to inform the development of strategies to address health inequities. 

Peer Engagement Evaluation Project (PEEP)

Building on the harm reduction activities of the BC Centre for Disease Control, a three-year research project called the Peer Engagement and Evaluation Project (PEEP) was initiated. The result is a document titled Peer engagement principles and best practices: A guide for BC health authorities and other providers.

The document reinforces the role of peers as experts and is based on best practice guides developed through participatory qualitative research — including peer substance users. It emphasizes the importance of shared decision-making power with the communities being affected by the health equity issues addressed.

Practical tools

The guide includes practical tools such as:

  • a peer engagement checklist;
  • a spectrum of peer engagement in decision-making about harm reduction; and
  • key questions to ask of peers as well as program staff.

The resource also explores the dos and don’ts of peer engagement, as well as other practical considerations for how to involve people who use drugs, including communications, overcoming barriers and settings.

Use this resource to:

  • facilitate discussion about peer engagement with communities who experience inequities in substance use harms;
  • develop evidence-based practices to engage with communities who experience inequities in authentic and ongoing ways; and
  • develop a tool to apply peer engagement principles to decision-making and prioritization of resources and initiatives to address substance use and health equity.

Reference

Greer, A.M., Amlani, A.A., Buxton, J.A. & the PEEP team. (2017). Peer Engagement Principles and Best Practices: A guide for BC Health Authorities and Other Providers (Version 2). Vancouver, BC; BC Centre for Disease Control.

Related resources

Tags: Community engagement, Healthy public policy, Methods & tools, Public Health Organization, Link

Youth action on food insecurity: A toolkit for secondary school students to use in clubs and other extracurricular activities (DRAFT)

This resource is available in English only.

This resource is currently in draft form. To provide feedback on its contents, please complete the authors’ feedback survey, available here.

Household food insecurity is a determinant of health equity and is caused by inadequate income, or not having enough money to buy food to feed individuals and/or their families. Despite the income-based roots of food insecurity, the discussion among youth about solutions to this issue is often limited to food charity, such as non-perishable food donation drives, which do not help people to be more food secure.

Food security awareness in schools

Designed for students in grades 9–12 involved in food security awareness initiatives, this toolkit from Ontario Dietitians in Public Health (ODPH) offers user-friendly resources and ideas that schools can use to develop awareness-raising campaigns about food insecurity.

The resource includes:

  • steps for campaign development;
  • sources of reliable information on food insecurity;
  • sample activities;
  • sample resources to adapt; and
  • social media and communications messages.

External recommended resources include a digital poverty simulation and sample videos to stimulate discussion. In addition, the authors offer a variety of activity ideas to suit multiple environments.

Useful for students and practitioners

This toolkit can be used directly by students and by public health practitioners working with schools to encourage social justice activities that focus on income-based strategies to address food insecurity and discourage a focus on food charity as a solution.

A feedback survey (in English) asks users to provide comments on the content and usefulness of this toolkit, which is useable in its current form and will be finalized in 2020.

Use this resource to:

  • facilitate discussion about income-based solutions to food insecurity with students, teachers and school administrators;
  • develop messaging about the limits of food charity as a solution to food insecurity, and shifting the focus towards income-based policy action; and
  • support public health school–based interventions addressing food insecurity and student advocacy efforts.

Reference

Ontario Dietitians in Public Health. (2019). Youth Action on Food Insecurity: A Toolkit for Secondary School Students to Use in Clubs and Other Extracurricular Activities (DRAFT). Toronto, ON: Ontario Dietitians in Public Health.

Related resources

Tags: Communicate, Food security, Health literacy, Public Health Organization, Link

Community planning tool: Applying a health equity lens to program planning

This resource is available in English only.

Program planning to influence community and public health inequities is considered a core strategy to address the social determinants of health. Strong planning can help identify when a current program may both unintentionally worsen as well as help to reduce health inequities.

With this in mind, the Fraser Health Authority has developed this planning tool to support programs who are trying to address physical, social, mental, and emotional health in their communities.

Seven-step tool

The tool is organized into seven distinct steps of program planning and implementation to support the design of programs that address inequities. It is also designed to help tailor interventions to communities who need them the most.

The seven steps are as follows:

  1. Assess Inequities & Define Scope
  2. Identify & Assemble Partnerships
  3. Assess Community Capacity & Engage Community
  4. Select Approach to Change & Plan for Action
  5. Implement & Monitor
  6. Assess Your Progress
  7. Maintain Momentum

The tool can be used by individuals and teams, and includes:

  • worksheets to guide practitioners through each step;
  • a glossary of key terms; and
  • appendices that contain guidance on how to complete the various stages of each step in the process.

This tool will be useful for short and long-term program planning to address community needs and take action on health inequities. It is particularly relevant to community organizations, public health practitioners at frontline and management levels, and community partners.

Use this resource to:

adapt a program planning process to consider how to build on the strengths and capacity of groups who live with health inequities.
identify stakeholders, community resources and long-term structures necessary to do collaborative and sustained work on health equity; and
initiate discussion about how public health programs can unintentionally worsen health inequities and some of the ways to reduce that negative impact.

Reference

Fraser Health. (2018). Community Planning Tool: Applying a Health Equity Lens to Program Planning. Surrey (BC): Fraser Health.

Related resources

Tags: Assess and report, Community engagement, Methods & tools, Modify & orient, Partnership , Public Health Organization, Link

Social determinants, health equity, and mental health: A curated list

This resource is also available in French.

The National Collaborating Centre for Determinants of Health (NCCDH) has compiled and described 17 resources to support public health action on the social determinants of health and health equity as a way to promote positive mental health. The list also includes additional resources for users to consult.

The resources are organized into four categories: evidence and background information on key concepts, proposed actions at multiple levels, implications for practice and policy, and mental health inequities experienced by specific population groups. 

Use this resource to:

  • facilitate discussion about the intersection of socioeconomic and structural determinants of health and population mental health promotion;
  • consider how to address social determinants of mental health equity through public health programs, interventions and policies; and
  • develop a process to identify population groups experiencing mental health inequities and create strategies to act on the social determinants that contribute to these inequities.

Reference

National Collaborating Centre for Determinants of Health. (2019). Social Determinants, Health Equity, and Mental Health: A Curated List. National Collaborating Centre for Determinants of Health. Antigonish, NS: St Francis Xavier University.

Tags: Healthy public policy, Mental Health, Modify & orient, Reading list, National Collaborating Centre for Determinants of Health, Report/document

Promising practices in suicide prevention across Inuit Nunangat: NISPS research and data collection project

This resource is available in English only.

The National Inuit Suicide Prevention Strategy

With the publication of the National Inuit Suicide Prevention Strategy in 2016, Inuit Tapiriit Kanatami (ITK) launched a rich discussion on both protective and risk factors for suicide in Inuit communities. The organization also used the resource to identify six priority action areas for action regarding suicide, such as creating social equity and mobilizing Inuit knowledge for resilience.

Contribution to the evidence base

This 2019 environmental scan provides an update on the state of knowledge as the 2016 strategy continues to be funded and implemented. Moreover, it shares what tractics are currently in place to address the disproportionate rate of suicide across the four regions of Canada’s Arctic that make up Inuit Nunangat.

Drawing from a review of grey and academic literature, as well as interviews with key informants, the scan presents findings and promising practices across six topic areas:

  • Links between childhood adversity and suicide;
  • Promising practices with respect to addressing child sexual abuse across Inuit Nunangat;
  • Promising practices with respect to social emotional development in Inuit Nunangat;
  • Promising practices with respect to safe shelters focusing on children and youth within Inuit Nunangat;
  • Promising practices with respect to current supports for Inuit within the justice system with a specific focus addressing child sexual abuse; and
  • Promising practices with respect to parenting and family support programs. (p. 11)

Gaps and opportunities

The results of this scan include many promising practices for suicide prevention identified by key informants. These practices are summarized in section 4.8 (p. 67) and include:

  • hiring and training local people to deliver programs;
  • involving elders in programming as often as possible;
  • moving slowly at early stages or program delivery; and
  • being responsive to changes suggested by community members.

Upstream interventions

Readers may also wish to note that promising upstream interventions for Inuit children and youth are most discussed in the context of

  • addressing child sexual abuse (section 4.3, p.23);
  • supporting social and emotional development (section 4.4, p. 32);
  • ensuring access to safe shelters and spaces; and
  • supporting parents and families (4.7, p.59).

Use this resource to

  • increase your overall understanding of Inuit suicide prevention, including the current state of knowledge, available programs and services, challenges and opportunities;
  • reflect on the six priority areas and their related promising practices; and
  • consider how the knowledge shared relates to public health programming in your jurisdiction, particularly if you are working within Inuit Nunangat.

Reference

Inuit Tapiriit Kanatami. (2019). Promising Practices in Suicide Prevention across Inuit Nunangat: NISPS Research and Data Collection Project. Ottawa (ON): Inuit Tapiriit Kanatami.

Related resources

Tags: Assess and report, Community engagement, Indigenous health , Mental Health, Community Organization, Link

Building organizational capacity for health equity action: A framework and assessment tool for public health – Summary report

This resource is available in English only.

Public health’s ability to address the social determinants of health (SDH) and health equity at a population level is complex and extends far beyond individual practitioner skills and knowledge. Recognizing this, Lambton Public Health developed a framework and assessment tool to identify key elements of public health organization-level capacity for action on health equity. 

Framework

The Conceptual framework for health equity action in public health (p. 11) describes both internal and external drivers that influence capacity for action on health equity at an organizational level. Internal drivers (p. 11-12) include leadership, formal and informal systems, resources, accountability, partnerships and governance structures. External drivers (p. 14) include policies, health threats, data, public interest, political will and “best evidence.”

The framework further explores how the internal drivers that influence how individuals take action play out within the broader organization, which functions within a dynamic and complex array of system level influences. For example, individual practitioner knowledge, skills and values are influenced by organizational processes and structures, including standards of practice, internal work culture and professional competencies. In turn, public policies, threats to health, epidemiological evidence, political will and public interest influence where organizations focus attention, which also framed how individuals can take action.

Assessment tool

As part of the same document, Lambton Public Health also created an assessment tool (p. 17) to support public health organizations as they identify existing components of organizational capacity and areas to be strengthened.

This resource includes checklists to identify elements of organizational capacity at the individual, organization and system levels, with the goal of developing “capacity-building action plans” in order to amplify action on health inequities.

A template for calculating and evaluating a team or department’s cumulative scores (p. 29) provides guidance in interpreting results and making recommendations for increasing capacity to address health equity.

Use this resource to

  • facilitate discussion with public health colleagues about organization level factors that influence practitioner action on health equity;
  • conduct an assessment of factors that currently exist and where there are gaps at the individual, organization, and system levels of the organization; and
  • develop an action plan to strengthen organizational capacity to take action on SDH and health equity.

Reference

Lambton Public Health. (2017). Building Organizational Capacity for Health Equity Action: A Framework and Assessment Tool for Public Health. Point Edward, ON; Lambton Public Health.

Related resources

Tags: Competencies & organizational standards , Leadership & capacity building, Public health unit / health authority, Public Health Organization, Report/document

Driving forward health equity – the role of accountability, policy coherence, social participation and empowerment

This resource is available in English and Polish only.

As part of the World Health Organization (WHO) European Health Equity Status Report initiative, this summary report presents the findings of a scientific expert review on the lack of progress in health equity in the region, despite significant investment to address individual determinants. Presenting their results in four related reports, the review panel found that accountability, policy coherence, social participation and empowerment were key drivers of health equity. In other words, when these drivers were present, there was greater action to reduce health inequities.

Corporate influence

The report considers the increasing effect of corporations on progress towards health equity, and discusses the importance of these key drivers in mitigating negative effects of the “commercial determinants of health.” The authors give equal attention to the idea that integrated governance is essential for policies that are coherent across levels of government and different sectors.

Throughout this work, accountability, policy coherence, social participation and empowerment are conceptualized as related and even synergistic “common goods.” This means that when accountability is ensured, when policy is aligned and coherent across governments and across sectors, when society is well represented and participates in decision-making and policy processes and when communities are empowered, human rights principles are at play.

As a result, there are multiple benefits (outlined in Table 1 on p. 7 of the summary report), and there is an overall positive effect on health equity. 

The following advice is given to those working in public health and policy:

  • Value the knowledge and experience of communities.
  • Make the most out of “empowering spaces” (e.g., community gatherings).
  • Stop using “stigmatizing narratives of disadvantage.”

Note that the WHO Regional Office for Europe has published three additional reports related to this summary:

Use these resources to:

  • reflect on the applicability of accountability, policy coherence, social participation and empowerment as drivers for health equity action in the Canadian context;
  • consider the multiple benefits of these key drivers; and
  • discuss, with your public health colleagues, how to better value the knowledge and experiences of communities, make the most of “empowering spaces”, and change stigmatizing narratives.

Reference

WHO Regional Office for Europe. (2019). Driving Forward Health Equity – the Role of Accountability, Policy Coherence, Social Participation and Empowerment. Copenhagen (Denmark): WHO Regional Office for Europe.

Related resources

Tags: Community engagement, Healthy public policy, Key concepts, Public Health Organization, Link

Achieving health equity for LGBT people

This resource is available in English only.

Achieving Health Equity for LGBT People is an interactive online module developed by the National LGBT Health Education Centre, an organization working to address healthcare disparities that affect LGBTQ (lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, queer) people. The module explores health inequities experienced by the LGBTQ community, deepens understanding of core concepts and definitions, and identifies strategies to improve health care for LGBTQ people.

Support for LGBTQ health

Components of the module include the importance of addressing LGBTQ health broadly, including aspects of stigma and discrimination as well as influence on life course trajectories for LGBTQ people. Definitions and core concepts are provided to identify common terminology and increase understanding across sectors and groups.

The resource also offers strategies for supporting LGBTQ people in a clinical setting, including clinical education for culturally sensitive care for LGBTQ communities and a focus on specific issues, such as HIV, smoking/tobacco use and preventive cancer care.

Relevant to public health practice

The module houses segments on LGBTQ youth and creating sensitive and caring environments to serve LGBTQ communities that draw attention to the context of family dynamics and acceptance by healthcare providers.

While the content is largely clinical in focus, there are components that are particularly pertinent to public health practice, such as:

  • information about connecting to services across sectors,
  • advice about collecting and presenting data about LGBTQ populations; and
  • context around the socioeconomic factors that affect health disparities among LGBTQ people.

A glossary of terms related to LGBTQ health provides an opportunity to create common understanding and strengthen communications.

Online modules

Users can access the interactive online module, as well as download PPT slides for later reference. The data and terminology are U.S. based, though core concepts apply to the Canadian context.

Users will need to register with the National LGBT Health Education Centre by creating a username and password to access the modules. Users can opt out of continuing education credits and for receiving e-mail notifications. If the modules do not function in one internet browser, open them in a different browser for full functionality.

Use this resource to:

  • deepen understanding of core concepts related to inequities experienced by LGBTQ communities;
  • facilitate a cross-sector discussion about how public health and primary care can collaborate to reduce LGBTQ health inequities; and
  • initiate discussion with organizations to develop and sustain meaningful engagement with LGTB communities.

Reference

National LGBT Health Education Centre. (n.d.). Achieving Health Equity for LGBT People [Online module]. Retrieved from: https://www.lgbthealtheducation.org/learning-module/achieving-health-equity/.

Related resources

Tags: Access to health services, Community engagement, LGBTQ health, Sex & gender, Community Organization, Link

Learning Essentials for Advancing Health Equity series

This resource is available in English and French.

The Learning Essentials to Advance Health Equity series is a collection of resources developed as part of the Building Capacity for Equity-Informed Planning and Evaluation Project, a partnership between the Alliance for Healthier Communities and Access Alliance Multicultural Health and Community Services.   

The goal of this project was to develop tools and resources that support organization-level capacity for community health centres (CHCs) to address inequities in healthcare access, healthcare quality and health outcomes.

The series includes a number of health equity learning modules on the basics of health equity concepts, using data to advance health equity efforts and evaluating improvements to health equity. It also offers tools to assess baseline health equity status, data collection and analysis to assess client needs, and planning tools such as a project charter and evaluation guide.

Additional tools for planning evidence reviews, employment surveys and other information gathering and analysis to support organization level capacity building are also offered.

Resource inventory

A resource inventory for healthcare organizations (available in English only) offers a framework to guide capacity-building to address health equity at multiple levels of a community health organization.

 It includes tools mapped onto each domain of the framework and subject area. The framework, tools and concepts can be adapted to various organizations and areas of public and community health practice.

Use this resource to

  • facilitate discussion about what components of organization-level capacity for health equity action are strong or need improvement in your organization;
  • assess how current programs and approaches address health equity and where they could be improved; and
  • develop a professional development plan to strengthen knowledge about organizational capacity to take action on health inequities in healthcare access and outcomes.

Reference

Alliance for Healthier Communities. (2018). Learning Essentials for Advancing Health Equity Series. Alliance for Healthier Communities and Access Alliance Multicultural Health and Community Services; Toronto (Ont).

Related resources

Tags: Leadership & capacity building, Methods & tools, Modify & orient, Public Health Organization, Link

Social determinants of health: Know what affects health

This resource is available in English only.

This website from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) provides links to CDC resources, tools and evidence to support public health, community organizations and healthcare professionals in taking action to address the impact of social determinants of health (SDH).

Resource groupings

Resources are offered in several groupings that align with the delivery public and community health services to facilitate uptake into both responsive and long-term practice:

  • “Know What Affects Health”: A broad overview of how SDH influence health, as well as a link to health system transformation and community wide approaches to show positive health outcomes and economic benefits.  
  • “Sources of Data on SDOH,” including disease rates and vulnerability indicators
  • “CDC Research on SDOH,” including the influence of economics, education, socioenvironmental context, healthcare and built environment on health outcomes  
  • “Tools for Putting SDOH into Action,” including best practices, data set directory, toolkits and program-specific guides to addressing SDH.
  • “CDC Programs Addressing SDOH,” such as built environment, lead poisoning, leadership, partnership, violence and race-based disparities in health.
  • “Policy Resources to Support SDOH,” such as chronic disease tracking, health impact assessment and intersection with non-health-specific policy approaches
  • Additional links to further resources and FAQs are also provided

While many of the tools and data sources are US based, most can provide a template for strategies and approaches that could be applied to the Canadian public health context, including place-based framework and research on social and community context.  

Use this resource to

  • initiate discussion about reorienting community and public health programs and services to address the impact of SDH on health outcomes; and
  • support reorienting non-health-specific policy approaches to better address the impact of SDH on health outcomes

Reference

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. (2018). Tools for Putting Social Determinants of Health into Action. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Social Determinants of Health; US Department of Health and Human Services.

Related resources

Tags: Healthy public policy, Methods & tools, Modify & orient, Public Health Organization, Link

Towards a social justice approach to comprehensive tobacco control

This resource is available in English only.

Eliminating differences in tobacco use between different groups negatively affected by the social determinants of health can help achieve health equity. The development and adaptation of tobacco control policies has influenced health inequities among populations that have the highest rates of smoking.

The Propel Centre for Population Health Impact and the Program Training and Consultation Centre have compiled literature to guide strategy and intervention development to reduce health inequities in community and population health tobacco control initiatives.

Policy intervention

This evidence review identified taxation on tobacco products as the policy intervention with the greatest potential to reduce inequities in tobacco use based on socioeconomic status. Other strategies commented on include smoking bans, retail outlets, mass media campaigns, school-based interventions, multijurisdiction policies and cessation supports.

Implications of the evidence

The implications of this evidence for research, policy and practice support the use of tobacco control policies grounded in social justice principles as a strategy to reduce tobacco use among populations who live in low socioeconomic contexts.

Separate recommendations for researchers, practitioners and policy-makers are outlined to guide their work towards addressing inequities in tobacco use. An appendix describing six examples of tobacco control interventions with a social justice perspective is also included.

Use this resource to:

  • facilitate discussion about unintended impact of tobacco control programs that may actually increase or worsen health inequities;
  • support programs and interventions on tobacco control that directly address the social determinants of health and health inequities at a community and population level; and
  • develop a tool that identifies areas within tobacco programs and policies that can be improved to address the socioenvironmental conditions of tobacco users.

Reference

Hyndman, B., Corvaglia-Douglas, O., Lambraki, I., Honsberger, N., Garcia, J. (2018). Towards a Social Justice Approach to Comprehensive Tobacco Control. Toronto: Program Training and Consultation Centre and the Propel Centre for Population Health Impact, University of Waterloo.

Related resources

Tags: Knowledge translation , Modify & orient, Policy analysis, Public Health Organization, Link

National Inuit climate change strategy

This resource is available in English and French.

This informative strategy asks readers to ethically partner with Inuit communities while contributing to climate policy at all levels.

Situating climate change as a current crisis with health equity impacts

Canada’s 51 Inuit communities are already experiencing and responding to significant climate change impacts. Projections for further changes are dire, including further loss of sea ice and thawing permafrost. Graphics on pages 11-14 help illustrate the interaction of these changes with existing inequities such as access to traditional foods, cultural practices, safe and affordable housing, and health services. The relationship between climate change, health and wellness is further explained on page 22.

Drawing on Indigenous knowledge and resilience

In his opening letter, Natan Obed, president, Inuit Tapiriit Kanatami, highlights the resilience and strength that has been required to deal with the lasting impacts of colonialism, and notes that this same resilience will continue to be key in addressing the current climate emergency affecting Inuit Nunangat. Self-determination is central to this strategy, with particular attention to Inuit-led research, action and partnerships driven by Inuit needs. Case studies of Inuit-led climate initiatives are effectively used throughout the document.

Five priority climate actions

The strategy identifies five interrelated priorities for climate action, including “improv[ing] Inuit and environmental health and wellness outcomes through integrated Inuit health, education and climate policies and initiatives” (p. 22). Each priority area is accompanied by a clearly stated objective and related actions. The report is also accompanied by a framework for collaborating with Inuit on climate actions (p. 28) and a strategy implementation guide (p. 37).

Use this resource to:

  • increase your understanding of how the changing climate compounds health inequities for Inuit;
  • reflect on how the recommended priority climate actions relate to your public health work;
  • review examples of Inuit-led climate action; and
  • learn how to work with Inuit communities and participate in policy development related to climate action.

Reference

Inuit Tapiriit Kanatami. (2019). National Inuit Climate Change Strategy. Ottawa: Inuit Tapiriit Kanatami.

Related resources

Tags: Assess and report, Climate change, Environmental health, Indigenous health , Key concepts, Link

Health Inequities Series fact sheets

This resource is available in English only. Click here to access the printable version.

The Core Competencies for Public Health in Canada include the requirement that public health practitioners demonstrate knowledge and understanding of the social determinants of health (SDH) and health inequities. The Health Inequities Series, developed by Kingston, Frontenac, Lennox and Addington Public Health (KFLAPH), is a set of fact sheets designed to support professional development and competence in understanding and applying the underlying concepts related to SDH and health inequities and how they relate to public health program standards.

The fact sheets (available in interactive PDF and printable form) are designed for use by formal leadership as well as staff in programs, communications, evaluation, research and data, as well as anyone who wants to gain a better understanding of concepts related to health equity.

Based on the four public health roles

Content includes definitions of key terms such as structural and intermediary determinants, socioeconomic position and context, social hierarchies and working upstream. A series of fact sheets is divided into four sections —Assess and Report, Modify and Orient, Engage with Other Sectors, and Participate in advancing healthy public policies — which align with requirements within the Ontario Public Health Standards (OPHS) Health Equity Guideline, based on the NCCDH resource Let’s Talk: Public health roles for improving health equity.

Each section outlines ways that various public health practitioners at different levels of the public health system can use the resources, tailoring the application of the concepts to specific roles. Links to additional resources within each section/role are also provided, including an extensive list of citations and glossary of key terms.

Use this resource to:

  • facilitate discussion with colleagues about health equity requirements within public health standards, and how these influence program planning, implementation and evaluation;
  • develop a plan for professional development to strengthen knowledge of health equity concepts on an individual or organizational level, including quality improvement plans; and
  • identify areas for practitioner training and education as a way to build organization-level capacity to address health equity.

Reference

Kingston, Frontenac, Lennox and Addington Public Health. (2019). The Health Inequities Series. Kingston: Kingston, Frontenac, Lennox and Addington Public Health.

Related resources

Tags: Communicate, Competencies & organizational standards , Public health unit / health authority, Public Health Organization, Report/document

Just societies: Health equity and dignified lives

This report is available in English and Spanish only.

This report by the Pan American Health Organization’s Commission on Equity and Health Inequalities in the Americas examines social and economic inequalities in the regions, and considers several related factors such as gender, sexuality, ethnicity, disability and daily living conditions. An expanded list of the structural drivers of inequities also play prominently into the analysis.  

Conceptual framework

The conceptual framework presented in this report (p. 9) builds on the work of the previous World Health Organization Commission on the Social Determinants of Health, making several important additions:  

  • The list of structural drivers expands beyond the political, social, cultural and economic, emphasizing the natural environment and climate change and the ongoing impact of colonialism and structural racism.
  • Intersectionality is shown at the top of the framework as an ever-present frame, and sexuality, disability and migration are explicitly named.
  • Governance and human rights action on both structural drivers and the conditions of daily life are named as pathways to health equity

In sections three to five, the report makes 12 recommendations, presenting each with a table of specific objectives and concrete actions.

  1. Achieving equity in political, social, cultural, and economic structures
  2. Protecting the natural environment, mitigating climate change, and respecting relationships to land
  3. Recognize and reverse health equity impacts of ongoing colonialism and structural racism
  4. Equity from the start––early life and education
  5. Decent work
  6. Dignified life at older ages
  7. Income and social protection
  8. Reducing violence for health equity
  9. Improving environment and housing conditions
  10. Equitable health systems
  11. Governance arrangements for health equity
  12. Fulfilling and protecting human rights.

Case stories

The report is made more readable by the inclusion of case stories and highlights from initiatives across the Americas. Readers will also find the connections drawn between the information in the report and other agreements useful (e.g., United Nations Sdustainable Development Goals and relevant PAHO resolutions).

Use this resource to:

  • reflect on an updated conceptualization of the structures that drive inequities in the Americas;
  • consider the 12 recommendations and their related actions as you engage in health equity–related policy and program development; and
  • design related continuing professional development opportunities for your team.

Reference

Pan American Health Organization. (2018). Just Societies: Health Equity and Dignified Lives. Executive Summary of the Report of the Commission of the Pan American Health Organization on Equity and Health Inequalities in the Americas. Washington, D.C.: PAHO.

Related resources

Tags: Assess and report, Critical works in health equity, Key concepts, Racism/racialization, Public Health Organization, Link

Place standard: How good is our place?

This resource is available in English only.

The Place Standard Tool is a planning tool from NHS Scotland that supports organizations, businesses and citizens to work together to identify assets and opportunities for improvement in communities. It considers the relationship between place development, well-being and health inequities, asking whether the development has a positive, negative or neutral effect on social, physical and cultural well-being of a community.

This tool can be applied to places that are already established, experiencing change or are in the early stages of being planned and developed. The tool provides a framework for facilitating community engagement, providing prompts for discussion to consider the physical and social aspects of place-based planning.

Rating the quality of spaces

The tool can be completed as an individual or on behalf of a collaborative process both online or on paper. A series of 14 questions (complemented by prompts) guide the user to rate the quality of place-based aspects such as transportation, active and natural spaces, facilities, structures, and social inclusion. Ratings are plotted on a diagram, resulting in a visual representation of where a place is “performing well” and where improvements are needed.

When completed, the discussion moves to agreeing on priority areas and actions to improve social and physical conditions of the place being discussed.

Applications

The website provides a detailed guide outlining purpose, audiences, contexts of use and types of places for which the tool can be used. In addition, there is a description of practical applications of the tool, such as materials, timing and other steps for implementation as part of groups, surveys and workshops.

Currently applied across municipalities in Scotland and in 11 European countries, the tool is transferable to other communities and relates to broader strategic directions including Health 2020 and the United Nations Sustainable Development Goals.

Use this resource to

  • involve community citizens directly in healthy physical and social environment planning;
  • facilitate collaborative discussion among stakeholders at multiple levels about priorities for physical and social environments;
  • assess strengths and opportunities in places where people live as a way to bring divergent views together; and
  • develop a plan for advocacy efforts to improve social and physical environments in places where people live.

Reference

NHS Scotland. (2015). Place Standard: How Good Is Our Place? Retrieved from: https://www.placestandard.scot/.

Related resources

Tags: Assess and report, Community engagement, Healthy public policy, Link

Building Healthy, Equitable Communities series

This resource is available in English only.

ChangeLab Solutions is an interdisciplinary organization that works to address structural inequities through policy development in communities where residents are at risk of health inequities. Their focus is on how a combination of policy and community power can give rise to new and innovative opportunities to address health inequities.

One of their key resources is the Building Healthy, Equitable Communities series, which focuses on identifying actionable areas to build healthy, equitable communities. Geared towards government and community leaders, each of the six training modules includes a blog post, a webinar and a recorded expert panel conversation.


Topics include:

An additional “bonus” training discusses policies at upper levels of government that override state (provincial) policies, and the search for local solutions to public health equity issues.


Catalogue of tools

ChangeLab Solutions also offers a catalogue of tools that highlights policy solutions in community and public health, including governance, neighborhoods, food, childcare/school, tobacco and healthcare. Numerous resources are linked that relate to key areas for action on health equity, including health in all policies, built environment, food security, early childhood and access to healthcare.


Use this resource to

  • facilitate discussion about public health policy solutions to community level health inequities;
  • plan continuing professional development opportunities around health equity for yourself and others in your organization; and
  • consider how current public health efforts in built environment, food security, early childhood and tobacco can engage community members in decision-making program development to address inequities.


Reference

ChangeLab Solutions. (2018). Building Healthy, Equitable Communities Series. Retrieved from: http://www.changelabsolutions.org/publications/building-healthy-equitable-communities-series


Related resources

Tags: Community engagement, Healthy public policy, Leadership & capacity building, Partnership , Community Organization, Link

Public Health Speaks: Equity and the built environment

This product is also available in French.

The built environment encompasses all the man-made surroundings where we live, work, study and play. [1,2] In September 2018, The National Collaborating Centre for Determinants of Health (NCCDH) brought together three leaders in public health practice and research to share their experiences and reflections on public health practice and action to advance health equity through the built environment. [3]

This resource summarizes that conversation, facilitated by Dr. Teri Emrich, knowledge translation specialist at the NCCDH.


Expert panel on the built environment

The conversation included the following participants:

  • Claire Gram, population health policy and projects lead, Vancouver Coastal Health
  • Dr. Nazeem Muhajarine, professor, Community Health and Epidemiology, College of Medicine, University of Saskatchewan, and director, Saskatchewan Population Health Evaluation Research Unit (SPHERU)
  • Dr. Lisa Richards, medical officer of health, Winnipeg Regional Health Authority

The contributors discuss their experiences bringing an equity lens to work in the built environment. They identify opportunities for public health to promote equity through the built environment, who to partner with and how to ensure public health has a seat at the planning table.

Practical actions and roles for public health in shaping a healthy, equitable built environment are also identified.

Use this resource to:

  • identify potential partners for public health to collaborate with to promote equity through the built environment; and
  • identify practical actions and roles for public health practitioners to promote equity through the built environment.

Reference:

National Collaborating Centre for Determinants of Health. Public Health Speaks: Equity and the Built Environment. Antigonish (NS): NCCDH, St Francis Xavier University (CA); 2018.

References:

[1.] Public Health Agency of Canada. The Chief Public Health Officer’s Report on the State of Public Health in Canada 2017: Designing Healthy Living [Internet]. Ottawa (ON): PHAC; 2017 [cited 2018 Nov 14]. Available from: https://www.canada.ca/en/public-health/services/publications/chief-public-health-officer-reports-state-public-health-canada/2017-designing-healthy-living.html

[2.] Healthy Canada by Design CLASP. Health equity and community design: What is the Canadian evidence saying? Planning Healthy Communities Fact Sheet Series, No. 3. [Internet]. Healthy Canada by Design CLASP; [cited 2018 Nov 14]. Available from: https://www.cip-icu.ca/Files/Healthy-Communities/FACTSHEETS-Equity-FINALenglish.aspx

[3.] National Collaborating Centre for Determinants of Health. Public Health Speaks: Equity and the Built Environment [Internet]. Antigonish (NS): NCCDH, St Francis Xavier University (CA); 2018. Available from:

Tags: Environmental health, Intersectoral action, National Collaborating Centre for Determinants of Health, Report/document

The Toronto Indigenous Health Advisory Circle (TIHAC): Advancing self-determined Indigenous health

This product is also available in French.

This document shares the story of the Toronto Indigenous Health Advisory Circle (TIHAC). Formed in January 2015, TIHAC represents a collaboration between Toronto Indigenous leaders and non-Indigenous health-focused organizations, including Toronto Public Health and the Toronto Central Local Health Integration Network.

TIHAC provides recommendations on how to improve health outcomes for Indigenous Peoples in Toronto and offers broader policy and advocacy direction to improve the social determinants of Indigenous health. This case story details TIHAC’s work over a period of 15 months, during which it created Toronto’s first self-determined Indigenous health strategy, released in 2016 – A reclamation of well being: Visioning a thriving and healthy urban Indigenous community.

This case story focuses on TIHAC’s work up to the release of the strategy, highlighting how TIHAC was formed, and identifying mechanisms leading to its success. Its purpose is to share TIHAC’s experience as a template for:

  • Indigenous and non-Indigenous co-learning and partnership
  • design and delivery of Indigenous self-determined public and acute health services and practices; and
  • policy development to improve the conditions of Indigenous Peoples’ daily lives


Use this resource to:

  • identify good practices for working to improve Indigenous health opportunities and outcomes;
  • foster Indigenous-determined approaches to strengthening and indigenizing health systems;
  • support the creation of self-determining Indigenous health advisory bodies to work in partnership with non-Indigenous government health agencies; and
  • deepen your understanding of the social determinants of Indigenous health.


Reference

Toronto Indigenous Health Advisory Circle, National Collaborating Centre for Determinants of Health, MUSKRAT Media. (2019). The Toronto Indigenous Health Advisory Circle (TIHAC): Advancing Self-Determined Indigenous Health. Antigonish, NS: National Collaborating Centre for Determinants of Health, St. Francis Xavier University.

Tags: Case study, Collaboration, Indigenous health , National Collaborating Centre for Determinants of Health, Report/document

Organizational Capacity for Health Equity Action Initiative: A brief description

This product is also available in French.

This document provides an overview of the National Collaborating Centre for Determinants of Health (NCCDH)’s Organizational Capacity for Health Equity Action Initiative (OCI). The OCI was launched in 2018 to help organizations develop their capacity for health equity action by offering relevant frameworks, strategies and organizational conditions for this work.


Introducing the organizational capacity initiative

The resource outlines the objectives of the project and anticipated outcomes, as well as its long-term goals. These goals include providing models for action on health equity that can be used by all public health organizations – not just the two sites in this pilot.

The description also provides a definition of what organizational capacity means for the NCCDH and offers an explanation for the various elements of the program:

  • The learning circle format
  • The practice sites
  • The literature scans
  • The advisory group

The Brief description is the first in a series of knowledge products to be written to support the OCI, which is the second iteration of the NCCDH’s Learning Together series. The first Learning Together series offered resources related to population health status reporting and was released in 2012.


Use this resource to

  • familiarize yourself and your team with the goals of the OCI;
  • consider whether organizational capacity for health equity is a goal you can introduce at your public health organization; and
  • learn more about the process for conducting your own learning circle groups regarding organizational capacity, which will be addressed in future knowledge products in this series.


Reference

National Collaborating Centre for Determinants of Health. (2019). Organizational Capacity for Health Equity Action Initiative: A Brief Description. Antigonish, NS: NCCDH, St. Francis Xavier University.

Tags: Leadership & capacity building, Learning Together, Organizational Capacity Initiative (OCI), Racism/racialization, National Collaborating Centre for Determinants of Health, Report/document

Local resources and health: Overview of knowledge synthesis

These fact sheets summarize the findings of a literature review on the relationship between health and the availability of local resources (e.g., parks, supermarkets, community centres, etc.) that impact our daily life. The fact sheets were created as part of an initiative by La Chaire de recherche du Canada Approches communautaires et inégalités de santé (CACIS) and funded by the Canadian Institutes of Health Research (CIHR) and l’Université de Montréal.

This series of resources presents an overview of evidence on the relationship between the physical, social, and mental health of urban populations in four distinct areas:

  • Housing
  • Food environment
  • Community life
  • Sustainable mobility
Local resources and health:
Overview of knowledge
synthesis — Housing
(2018)
Local resources and health:
Overview of knowledge
synthesis — Food environment
(2018)
Local resources and health: 
Overview of knowledge
synthesis — Community life
(2018)
Local resources and health:
Overview of knowledge
synthesis — Sustainable mobility
(2018)


The fact sheets include results from evidence reviews with moderate or high impact only. The full literature review results will be available in upcoming academic journal articles.


Use this resource to

  • facilitate a discussion with elected officials and decision-makers to develop, adopt and implement public policies promoting the health impacts of built environments, food security and community life;
  • support participatory action research to assess community-level factors that influence social determinants of health such as food access and housing; and
  • inform discussions regarding the use of evidence-based data to inform public health priorities and resource allocation.


References

Boyer, G. & Ducrocq, F. (2018). Local Resources and Health: Overview of Knowledge Synthesis – Housing. Montreal (QC): Chaire de recherche du Canada Approches communautaires et inégalités de santé.

Boyer, G. & Ducrocq, F. (2018). Local Resources and Health: Overview of Knowledge Synthesis – Food Environment. Montreal (QC): Chaire de recherche du Canada Approches communautaires et inégalités de santé.

Boyer, G. & Ducrocq, F. (2018). Local Resources and Health: Overview of Knowledge Synthesis – Community Life. Montreal (QC): Chaire de recherche du Canada Approches communautaires et inégalités de santé.

Boyer, G. & Ducrocq, F. (2018). Local Resources and Health: Overview of Knowledge Synthesis – Sustainable Mobility. Montreal (QC): Chaire de recherche du Canada Approches communautaires et inégalités de santé.

Tags: Community development, Food security, Housing, Methods & tools, National Collaborating Centre for Determinants of Health, Public Health Organization, Link

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