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Workshops & Events

Webinar: Measuring what counts in the midst of the COVID-19 pandemic: Equity indicators for public health

This webinar will take place in English.

This event is hosted jointly by the National Collaborating Centre for Determinants of Health (NCCDH) and the National Collaborating Centre for Infectious Diseases (NCCID).

In this webinar, speakers will discuss the development and application of a public health emergency preparedness framework, corresponding indicators and health equity prompts.

An expanded description is coming soon.

 

Speakers

Claire-Betker Margaret-Haworth-Brockman
Claire Betker, Scientific Director, NCCDH Margaret Haworth-Brockman, Senior Program Manager, NCCID
 
Dr. Yasmin Khan, Emergency Preparedness Physician, Health Protection, Public Health Ontario  

 

Related resources:

Measuring-what-counts  
Measuring what counts in the midst of the COVID-19 pandemic: Equity indicators for public health (2020) Public health emergency preparedness framework and indicators A workbook to support public health practice (2020)  

 

Click here to register

  • Presenters:
  • Margaret Haworth-Brockman, Yasmin Khan, 
  • Claire Betker
    Claire Betker

    Claire Betker, RN, MN, CCHN(C), PHD

    Scientific Director

    Claire arrived on March 4, 2019, as the NCCDH’s scientific director. A registered nurse, she was most recently the acting Executive Director of the Population and Public Health Branch with Manitoba Health, Seniors and Active Living. Her career has included roles in rural public health and home health, primary health care, a regional health authority and the Public Health Agency of Canada, as well as previously serving as a senior knowledge translation specialist with the NCCDH. Claire is currently the president of the Canadian Nurses Association and a past president of the Community Health Nurses of Canada. Her PhD work focused on the capacity for public health leadership to advance health equity, a knowledge base that greatly informs her contributions to the NCCDH and the public health field. Claire brings a wealth of expertise, rich networks and a passion to translate knowledge and evidence, especially to position public health to advance health equity.

    cbetker@stfx.ca

Webinar: Moving health promotion forward as an accredited discipline

This event took place in English. Click here to access the recording (English).

This webinar was jointly presented by the National Collaborating Centre for Determinants of Health (NCCDH) and Health Promotion Canada.

 

Health promotion is a discipline that is continually striving to maintain its value base, its culture and its focus on tackling the wider socioecological determinants of health, all of which are entrenched in the Ottawa charter for health promotion.

Role of health promotion practitioners

Health promotion practitioners play an important role in the following activities:

  • Initiating and supporting partnerships across sectors
  • Developing and implementing programs
  • Advocating for and creating policy change
  • Supporting the development of positive environments
  • Providing quality, evidence-based services founded in health literacy.

Health promotion professionals hold a holistic view of health based in values of equity, self-determination, social justice, participation and empowerment. For this reason, they bring a unique contribution to current public health challenges.

Role of health promotion work

Health promotion work is integral to a number of sectors, including public and community health, education, community organizations and the private sector.

Health Promotion Canada developed core competencies for health promotion practice in Canada in 2015, bringing forward the possibility of moving health promotion towards an “accredited” discipline.

There is a common belief that, in order for the health promotion field to defend and uphold its position as a unique specialist discipline, consideration should be given to bringing an accreditation system to Canada for this field of practice.

This webinar explores the options for an accreditation system for health promotion practitioners in Canada and how this action can support working towards health equity.

Speakers on this webinar :

  • describe international health promotion accreditation processes and credentialing systems;
  • explore options for health promotion accreditation in Canada; and
  • discuss the role of health promotion accreditation to strengthen the ability to focus on socioecological determinants, social justice and health equity.

Speakers

Dianne Oickle Christine Preece
Dianne Oickle, Knowledge Translation Specialist, NCCDH Christine Preece, Chair, Ontario Healthy Schools Coalition 
Liane Comeau  
Liane Comeau, Executive Director, International Union for Health Promotion and Health Education  

 

Related resources:

Health Promotion in Canada: New perspectives on theory, practice, policy, and research, 4th edition (2018)

 

Click here to access the recording (English)

  • Presenters:
  • Liane Comeau, Christine Preece, 
  • Dianne Oickle
    Dianne Oickle

    Dianne Oickle, MSc, BSc

    Knowledge Translation Specialist

    Dianne is a dietitian with over 15 years’ experience working in public health in Ontario focused on reproductive and child health in a mostly rural setting with many diverse clients. Part of her work involved development of practice guidelines for health professionals, train-the-trainer initiatives, public presentations, educational resource development, working with the media, community coalition and network support, writing for the public and professionals, and program planning, implementation, and evaluation. She has taught university nutrition courses, worked with the provincial network supporting and advocating for dietitians in public health practice, and precepted over 20 dietetics and other students. Dianne earned her BSc in Nutrition and Consumer Studies (now Human Nutrition) at St. Francis Xavier University, and her MSc in Nutrition from the University of Saskatchewan.

    doickle@stfx.ca

Webinar: Tools for organizational learning and capacity

This webinar took place in English. Click here to access the recording.

To support learning and capacity building for health equity action, the NCCDH has developed a suite of evidence-informed online learning tools. These tools also respond to a growing need for free, virtual and bilingual training materials on the social determinants of health and health equity.

Individual practitioners can use these tools to build their own knowledge and meet disciplinary competency requirements. Public health organizations can use these resources as part of learning and training programs.

This webinar provides a brief overview of five NCCDH online learning resources, including their distinct audiences and functions, and engage participants in large and small group interaction.

These tools respond to a growing need for free, virtual training on the structural and social determinants of health as they relate to public health practice and advancing health equity.

Listeners will learn how these tools can be integrated into organizational training processes as well as how they can support individual self-directed learning and professional development.

Who should listen to this webinar?

  • Those looking for actionable professional development tools related to health equity and Canadian public health practice. This may include:
    • leaders choosing tools for staff;
    • practitioners looking for their own professional development resources; and
    • practitioners assigned a specific role to find tools for their peers/team/colleagues.
  • Those looking for introductory health equity resources
    • University course instructors
    • Public health students (e.g., MPH candidates)

Speakers

Pemma Muzumdar, Knowledge Translation Specialist, NCCDH Claire Betker, Scientific Director, NCCDH Sume Ndumbe-Eyoh, Senior Knowledge Translation Specialist, NCCDH
 
Dianne Oickle, Knowledge Translation Specialist, NCCDH Lesley Dyck, Volunteer, Health Promotion Canada  


Related resources


Click here to access the recording (in English)

  • Presenters:
  • Lesley Dyck, 
  • Pemma Muzumdar
    Pemma Muzumdar

    Pemma Muzumdar, MPH

    Knowledge Translation Specialist

    Pemma Muzumdar is motivated by a desire to improve well-being and planetary health, particularly those who, through intersecting factors, experience marginalization and exclusion. She is based out of Montreal, Quebec.

    Pemma has worked with the six National Collaborating Centres (NCCs) for Public Health in various capacities since 2011, developing and sharing knowledge, networks and resources for improved public health action. She completed her Masters of Public Health at the University of Waterloo in 2010, and draws from significant experience in science communication, public speaking, group facilitation, team learning and organizational development. Prior to joining the NCCs, Pemma contributed to dynamic teams at the Ontario Science Centre, Discovery Channel Canada, the Program Training and Consultation Centre of the Smoke Free Ontario Strategy, TakingITGlobal and the Li Ka Shing Knowledge Institute at St. Michael’s Hospital.

    pmuzumd@stfx.ca
  • Claire Betker
    Claire Betker

    Claire Betker, RN, MN, CCHN(C), PHD

    Scientific Director

    Claire arrived on March 4, 2019, as the NCCDH’s scientific director. A registered nurse, she was most recently the acting Executive Director of the Population and Public Health Branch with Manitoba Health, Seniors and Active Living. Her career has included roles in rural public health and home health, primary health care, a regional health authority and the Public Health Agency of Canada, as well as previously serving as a senior knowledge translation specialist with the NCCDH. Claire is currently the president of the Canadian Nurses Association and a past president of the Community Health Nurses of Canada. Her PhD work focused on the capacity for public health leadership to advance health equity, a knowledge base that greatly informs her contributions to the NCCDH and the public health field. Claire brings a wealth of expertise, rich networks and a passion to translate knowledge and evidence, especially to position public health to advance health equity.

    cbetker@stfx.ca
  • Dianne Oickle
    Dianne Oickle

    Dianne Oickle, MSc, BSc

    Knowledge Translation Specialist

    Dianne is a dietitian with over 15 years’ experience working in public health in Ontario focused on reproductive and child health in a mostly rural setting with many diverse clients. Part of her work involved development of practice guidelines for health professionals, train-the-trainer initiatives, public presentations, educational resource development, working with the media, community coalition and network support, writing for the public and professionals, and program planning, implementation, and evaluation. She has taught university nutrition courses, worked with the provincial network supporting and advocating for dietitians in public health practice, and precepted over 20 dietetics and other students. Dianne earned her BSc in Nutrition and Consumer Studies (now Human Nutrition) at St. Francis Xavier University, and her MSc in Nutrition from the University of Saskatchewan.

    doickle@stfx.ca
  • Sume Ndumbe-Eyoh
    Sume Ndumbe-Eyoh

    Sume Ndumbe-Eyoh, MHSc

    Senior Knowledge Translation Specialist

    Sume has professional experiences in equity-focused organizational and community development and change, social justice education, HIV/AIDS prevention, research, knowledge translation, evaluation and women's rights with local, provincial and global organizations. Sume has previously contributed to teams at the Program Training and Consultation Centre of the Smoke Free Ontario Strategy, the Regional Diversity Roundtable, Ontario HIV Treatment Network, Southern African AIDS Trust and the Centre for Social Justice. Sume holds a Masters of Health Sciences in Health Promotion and Global Health from the University of Toronto.

    seyoh@stfx.ca

Webinar: Actionable ways to address anti-Black racism & police violence through public health practice

This webinar took place in English. Click here to access the recording (in English only).

The ubiquitous anti-Black racism within law enforcement has led to the loss of many innocent Black lives at the hands of police officers. Andrew Loku, Trayvon Martin, Eric Garner, Michael Brown, Tamir Rice, Sandra Bland, Breonna Taylor, Regis Korchinski-Paquet and George Floyd are among the many Black lives that were taken too soon. These lives are but a fraction of the toll of persistent structural violence that impedes and threatens Black life. 

This webinar places anti-Black police violence in context of ongoing anti-Black racism.

Speakers from within the Black health and legal community discuss the impact of state-sponsored violence on health and provide an opportunity to discuss actionable ways to address anti-Black police brutality and violence in the Canadian public health community. 

The webinar creates the space to have discussions that focus on how public health institutions and the community as a whole should address anti-Black police violence through public health practice.

Listners will learn about:

  • the impact of anti-Black racism and anti-Blackness on health;
  • anti-Black racism and police violence in the Canadian context; and
  • a public and population health response to anti-Black police violence.

Speakers

Sume Ndumbe-Eyoh, Senior Knowledge Translation Specialist, NCCDH
Dr. Notisha Massaquoi, Principal Consultant, Nyanda Consulting; former Executive Director, Women’s Health in Women’s Hands
Nana Yanful Gaynor Watson-Creed
Nana Yanful, Staff Lawyer and Legal Team Lead, Black Legal Action Centre
Dr. Gaynor Watson-Creed, Deputy Chief Medical Officer of Health, Nova Scotia Health Authority

 

Related resources

For all participants: 

Addressing law enforcement violence as a public health issue Let’s talk: Racism and health equity Key public health resources for anti-racism action: A curated list


For participants who are just beginning to learn about anti-racism, please consult one or more of the following webinars as a primer: 

 

Click here to access the recording (in English only)

  • Presenters:
  • Dr. Notisha Massaquoi, Nana Yanful, 
  • Sume Ndumbe-Eyoh
    Sume Ndumbe-Eyoh

    Sume Ndumbe-Eyoh, MHSc

    Senior Knowledge Translation Specialist

    Sume has professional experiences in equity-focused organizational and community development and change, social justice education, HIV/AIDS prevention, research, knowledge translation, evaluation and women's rights with local, provincial and global organizations. Sume has previously contributed to teams at the Program Training and Consultation Centre of the Smoke Free Ontario Strategy, the Regional Diversity Roundtable, Ontario HIV Treatment Network, Southern African AIDS Trust and the Centre for Social Justice. Sume holds a Masters of Health Sciences in Health Promotion and Global Health from the University of Toronto.

    seyoh@stfx.ca
  • Gaynor Watson-Creed
    Gaynor Watson-Creed

    Gaynor Watson-Creed, (Co-Chair) MSc, MD, CCFP, FRCPC

    Chief Medical Officer for Nova Scotia

Webinar: Peer engagement to inform public health action on substance use and health equity

This event took place in English. Click here to access the recording (English only).

This webinar was jointly presented by the National Collaborating Centre for Determinants of Health (NCCDH) and the National Collaborating Centre for Methods and Tools (NCCMT).

 

Peer engagement is described by the BC Centre for Disease Control (BCCDC) as “the active participation of people with lived experience … in different research, program, and policy decision-making processes.” [1, p.5] Peer engagement in public health work can provide valuable insight into opportunities for effective and meaningful public health action to address risk and preventive factors for substance use.

Understanding of peer engagement principles and practical considerations is necessary for public health to build meaningful relationships with communities with lived experience of substance use to inform the suitability and application of strategies to address health inequities.


Practical tools

This webinar explores the BCCDC document titled Peer engagement principles and best practices: A guide for BC health authorities and other providers as a practical tool to inform health system decisions and priorities to reduce substance use related harms.

Speakers from the Peer Engagement and Evaluation Project (PEEP) reflect on peer engagement principles and best practices for working with communities with lived experience of inequities and substance use. We also highlight practical considerations for the application of peer engagement principles, including how to address issues of stigma and trust and sharing decision-making power.


Listeners will learn about

  • peer engagement principles for working with communities who experience inequities in substance use harms;
  • practice-informed considerations for engaging with peers in authentic and ongoing ways; and
  • application of peer engagement principles to inform decisions and priorities of health authority initiatives to address substance use and health equity.


Speakers

Dianne Oickle, Knowledge Translation Specialist, NCCDH Kristin Read, Research Coordinator, NCCMT
Charlene Burmeister, BCCDC People with Lived and Living Experience Stakeholder Engagement Lead
Paul Choisil


Related resources


Reference:

[1] Greer, A.M., Amlani, A.A., Buxton, J.A. & the PEEP team. (2017). Peer Engagement Best Practices: A Guide for Health Authorities and other providers. Vancouver, BC: BC Centre for Disease Control.

 

Click here to access the recording (English only)

  • Presenters:
  • Kristin Read, Charlene Burmeister, Paul Choisil, 
  • Dianne Oickle
    Dianne Oickle

    Dianne Oickle, MSc, BSc

    Knowledge Translation Specialist

    Dianne is a dietitian with over 15 years’ experience working in public health in Ontario focused on reproductive and child health in a mostly rural setting with many diverse clients. Part of her work involved development of practice guidelines for health professionals, train-the-trainer initiatives, public presentations, educational resource development, working with the media, community coalition and network support, writing for the public and professionals, and program planning, implementation, and evaluation. She has taught university nutrition courses, worked with the provincial network supporting and advocating for dietitians in public health practice, and precepted over 20 dietetics and other students. Dianne earned her BSc in Nutrition and Consumer Studies (now Human Nutrition) at St. Francis Xavier University, and her MSc in Nutrition from the University of Saskatchewan.

    doickle@stfx.ca

Health equity, determinants of health and COVID-19: Conversation 5

This event took place in English, with closed captioning and simultaneous American Sign Language (ASL) interpretation. Click here to access the recording (English only).

This was the fifth webinar in our ongoing conversation series regarding COVID-19. To see the full listing of conversations, click here.

 

Join us for a conversation on equitable futures in a post-COVID-19 society.

As the COVID-19 pandemic evolves, it follows and amplifies lines of existing inequities. We recognize that you, our friends and colleagues in the public health community, are being called to go above and beyond, whether from your home office or on the frontlines.

To support equity-informed responses, the NCCDH is hosting a series of community conversations on the topic. This is an opportunity for the public health field to explore equity-informed responses through action on the social and structural determinants of health. The conversation will connect practitioners with each other, and provide an opportunity to share experiences, resources, questions and solutions-focused ideas.


Frequency

Conversations will be held weekly throughout April 2020. We will continue to monitor the evolving situation and adapt our response.


Host

Sume Ndumbe-Eyoh, Senior Knowledge Translation Specialist, NCCDH


Guest speakers

Camille Orridge
Camille Orridge, former CEO (retired), Toronto Central LHIN; Senior Fellow, Wellesley Institute (Black futures at the intersection of social determinants of health)
Trish Hennessy, Executive Director, Upstream (just transitions)
 
Louis Sorin, Co-Chair, NCCDH Advisory Board; Board Member, Canadian Association for Mental Health  


Resources

We are posting resources we believe will be most useful to you on our website, under “Equity-informed responses to COVID-19.” We will update the page regularly and welcome your questions, comments, and suggestions. You can sign-up to receive updates here.


Click here to access the recording (English only)

  • Presenters:
  • Camille Orridge, Trish Hennessy, Louis Sorin, 
  • Sume Ndumbe-Eyoh
    Sume Ndumbe-Eyoh

    Sume Ndumbe-Eyoh, MHSc

    Senior Knowledge Translation Specialist

    Sume has professional experiences in equity-focused organizational and community development and change, social justice education, HIV/AIDS prevention, research, knowledge translation, evaluation and women's rights with local, provincial and global organizations. Sume has previously contributed to teams at the Program Training and Consultation Centre of the Smoke Free Ontario Strategy, the Regional Diversity Roundtable, Ontario HIV Treatment Network, Southern African AIDS Trust and the Centre for Social Justice. Sume holds a Masters of Health Sciences in Health Promotion and Global Health from the University of Toronto.

    seyoh@stfx.ca

Health equity, determinants of health and COVID-19: Conversation 4

This event took place in English, with closed captioning and simultaneous American Sign Language (ASL) interpretation. Click here to access the recording (English only).

This is the third webinar in our ongoing conversation series regarding COVID-19. To see the full listing of conversations, click here.

 

Join us for a conversation on community impacts and responses related to food insecurity, disability and ethics.

As the COVID-19 pandemic evolves, it follows and amplifies lines of existing inequities. We recognize that you, our friends and colleagues in the public health community, are being called to go above and beyond, whether from your home office or on the frontlines.

To support equity-informed responses, the NCCDH is hosting a series of community conversations on the topic. This is an opportunity for the public health field to explore equity-informed responses through action on the social and structural determinants of health. The conversation will connect practitioners with each other, and provide an opportunity to share experiences, resources, questions and solutions-focused ideas.


Frequency

Conversations will be held weekly throughout April 2020. We will continue to monitor the evolving situation and adapt our response.


Host

Sume Ndumbe-Eyoh, Senior Knowledge Translation Specialist, NCCDH


Guest speakers

Dr. Valerie Tarasuk, Professor, University of Toronto; Founding Investigator, PROOF (food insecurity)
Nelly Bassily, Manager of the Youth Initiatives and International Relationships, DisAbled Women’s Network Canada (DAWN) (girls and young women with disabilities)
 
Michael Keeling, Scientific Advisor, National Collaborating Centre for Healthy Public Policy (NCCHPP) (ethical issues in the pandemic as they intersect with equity)  


Resources

We are posting resources we believe will be most useful to you on our website, under “Equity-informed responses to COVID-19.” We will update the page regularly and welcome your questions, comments, and suggestions. You can sign-up to receive updates here.

Visit the National Collaborating Centre for Healthy Public Policy website to learn more about ethics frameworks and guidance for pandemics and public health emergencies.


Click here to access the recording (English only)

  • Presenters:
  • Valerie Tarasuk, Nelly Bassily, Michael Keeling, 
  • Sume Ndumbe-Eyoh
    Sume Ndumbe-Eyoh

    Sume Ndumbe-Eyoh, MHSc

    Senior Knowledge Translation Specialist

    Sume has professional experiences in equity-focused organizational and community development and change, social justice education, HIV/AIDS prevention, research, knowledge translation, evaluation and women's rights with local, provincial and global organizations. Sume has previously contributed to teams at the Program Training and Consultation Centre of the Smoke Free Ontario Strategy, the Regional Diversity Roundtable, Ontario HIV Treatment Network, Southern African AIDS Trust and the Centre for Social Justice. Sume holds a Masters of Health Sciences in Health Promotion and Global Health from the University of Toronto.

    seyoh@stfx.ca

Health equity, determinants of health and COVID-19: Conversation 3

This event took place in English. Click here to access the recording (English only).

This was the third webinar in our ongoing conversation series regarding COVID-19. To see the full listing of conversations, click here.

 

Join us for a conversation on Indigenous perspectives on COVID-19.

As the COVID-19 pandemic evolves, it follows and amplifies lines of existing inequities. We recognize that you, our friends and colleagues in the public health community, are being called to go above and beyond, whether from your home office or on the frontlines.

To support equity-informed responses, the NCCDH is hosting a series of community conversations on the topic. This is an opportunity for the public health field to explore equity-informed responses through action on the social and structural determinants of health. The conversation connects practitioners with each other, and provides an opportunity to share experiences, resources, questions and solutions-focused ideas.


Frequency

Conversations will be held weekly throughout April 2020. We will continue to monitor the evolving situation and adapt our response.


Host

Sume Ndumbe-Eyoh, Senior Knowledge Translation Specialist, National Collaborating Centre for Determinants of Health


Guest speakers

Dr. Angela Mashford-Pringle, Assistant Professor and Associate Director, Waakebiness-Bryce Institute for Indigenous Health, Dalla Lana School of Public Health, University of Toronto
Clay Shirt, Traditional Knowledge Keeper in Residence, Waakebiness-Bryce Institute for Indigenous Health, Dalla Lana School of Public Health, University of Toronto


Resources

We are posting resources we believe will be most useful to you on our website, under “Equity-informed responses to COVID-19.” We will update the page regularly and welcome your questions, comments, and suggestions. You can sign-up to receive updates here.

Visit the National Collaborating Centre for Indigenous Health and the Waakebiness-Bryce Institute for Indigenous Health for updates on Indigenous responses and perspectives on COVID-19.


Click here to access the recording (English only)

  • Presenters:
  • Dr. Angela Mashford-Pringle, Clay Shirt, 
  • Sume Ndumbe-Eyoh
    Sume Ndumbe-Eyoh

    Sume Ndumbe-Eyoh, MHSc

    Senior Knowledge Translation Specialist

    Sume has professional experiences in equity-focused organizational and community development and change, social justice education, HIV/AIDS prevention, research, knowledge translation, evaluation and women's rights with local, provincial and global organizations. Sume has previously contributed to teams at the Program Training and Consultation Centre of the Smoke Free Ontario Strategy, the Regional Diversity Roundtable, Ontario HIV Treatment Network, Southern African AIDS Trust and the Centre for Social Justice. Sume holds a Masters of Health Sciences in Health Promotion and Global Health from the University of Toronto.

    seyoh@stfx.ca

Health equity, determinants of health and COVID-19: Conversation 2

This webinar took place in English. Click here to access the recording for Conversation 2 (English only).

This was the second webinar in our ongoing conversation series regarding COVID-19. To see the full listing of conversations, click here.

 

Community impact and responses to COVID-19

As the COVID-19 pandemic evolves, it follows and amplifies lines of existing inequities. We recognize that you, our friends and colleagues in the public health community, are being called to go above and beyond, whether from your home office or on the frontlines.

To support equity-informed responses, the NCCDH is hosting a series of community conversations on the topic. This is an opportunity for the public health field to explore equity-informed responses through action on the social and structural determinants of health. The conversation connect practitioners with each other, and provide an opportunity to share experiences, resources, questions and solutions-focused ideas.


Frequency

Conversations will be held weekly throughout April 2020. We will continue to monitor the evolving situation and adapt our response.


Host

Sume Ndumbe-Eyoh, Senior Knowledge Translation Specialist, NCCDH

 

Guest speakers:

Samiya Abdi, Senior Program Specialist, Public Health Ontario (Black and racialized communities) Abe Oudshoorn, RN, PhD, Assistant Professor, Arthur Labatt Family School of Nursing, Western University (Homelessness)
 
Anjum Sultana, Director of Public Policy & Strategic Communications, YWCA Canada (Gender)  


Resources

We are posting resources we believe will be most useful to you on our website, under “Equity-informed responses to COVID-19.” We will update the page regularly and welcome your questions, comments, and suggestions. You can sign-up to receive updates here.

 

Click here to access the recording (English only)

  • Presenters:
  • Samiya Abdi, Abe Oudshoorn, Anjum Sultana, 
  • Sume Ndumbe-Eyoh
    Sume Ndumbe-Eyoh

    Sume Ndumbe-Eyoh, MHSc

    Senior Knowledge Translation Specialist

    Sume has professional experiences in equity-focused organizational and community development and change, social justice education, HIV/AIDS prevention, research, knowledge translation, evaluation and women's rights with local, provincial and global organizations. Sume has previously contributed to teams at the Program Training and Consultation Centre of the Smoke Free Ontario Strategy, the Regional Diversity Roundtable, Ontario HIV Treatment Network, Southern African AIDS Trust and the Centre for Social Justice. Sume holds a Masters of Health Sciences in Health Promotion and Global Health from the University of Toronto.

    seyoh@stfx.ca

Conversation series: Health equity, determinants of health and COVID-19

This webinar took place in English. Click here to access the recording for Conversation 1 (English only).

This was the first webinar in our conversation series regarding COVID-19, which started in April 2020. To register or see recordings for other conversations in this series, see the listing below.

 

As the COVID-19 pandemic evolves, it continues to follow and amplify lines of existing inequities. We recognize that you — our friends and colleagues in the public health community — are being called to go above and beyond, whether from your home office or on the front lines.

To support equity-informed responses, the NCCDH is hosting a series of community conversations on the topic. This is an opportunity for the public health field to explore equity-informed responses through action on the social and structural determinants of health. The conversation will connect practitioners with each other, and provide an opportunity to share experiences, resources, questions and solutions-focused ideas.


Frequency

Conversations will be held weekly throughout April 2020. We will continue to monitor the evolving situation and adapt our response.

The first conversation occurred  on April 1, 2020.


Other conversations in this series


Host

Sume Ndumbe-Eyoh, Senior Knowledge Translation Specialist, NCCDH


Guest speakers for Conversation 1

Dr. Claire Betker, Scientific Director, NCCDH (primary health care responses, social determinants of health) Dr. Yoav Keynan, Scientific Director, National Collaborating Centre for Infectious Diseases (infectious diseases, equity, pandemics)
Dr. Kate Mulligan, Director of Policy and Communications, Alliance for Healthier Communities (social determinants of health, policy responses)
Dr. Angela Mashford-Pringle, Assistant Professor and Associate Director, Waakebiness-Bryce Institute for Indigenous Health, Dalla Lana School of Public Health, University of Toronto (Indigenous perspectives, pandemic planning with First Nations communities)


Resources

We are posting resources we believe will be most useful to you on our website, under “Equity-informed responses to COVID-19.” 

We will update the resource page regularly and welcome your questions, comments and suggestions. You can sign-up to receive updates here.
 

Click here to access the recording for Conversation 1 (English only)

To access the recordings to subsequent conversations, see the listing of events provided above.

  • Presenters:
  • Yoav Keynan, Kate Mulligan, Angela Mashford-Pringle, 
  • Sume Ndumbe-Eyoh
    Sume Ndumbe-Eyoh

    Sume Ndumbe-Eyoh, MHSc

    Senior Knowledge Translation Specialist

    Sume has professional experiences in equity-focused organizational and community development and change, social justice education, HIV/AIDS prevention, research, knowledge translation, evaluation and women's rights with local, provincial and global organizations. Sume has previously contributed to teams at the Program Training and Consultation Centre of the Smoke Free Ontario Strategy, the Regional Diversity Roundtable, Ontario HIV Treatment Network, Southern African AIDS Trust and the Centre for Social Justice. Sume holds a Masters of Health Sciences in Health Promotion and Global Health from the University of Toronto.

    seyoh@stfx.ca

Webinar: Can understanding Whiteness improve anti-racism activities in health?

This webinar will take place in English. The webinar recording will be available on the event website after the event.

Te Tiriti-based futures + Anti-racism 2020 is a 10-day digital conference is based out of Aotearoa (New Zealand). It launches on March 21, 2020, the International Day for the Elimination of Racial Discrimination.

 

Public health organizations and practitioners are taking more of an interest in how to apply a decolonizing anti-racism approach to their work. This session will turn the gaze on Whiteness as a systemic feature and driver of racial inequities. Lifting the veil on Whiteness challenges its “normalcy” in settler colonial states like Canada and New Zealand.

We will discuss markers of Whiteness in health and in organizational settings. Furthermore, we will highlight the impact of Whiteness on health. The session will conclude with consideration of critical Whiteness approaches that are part of  decolonizing anti-racist practice.

Speakers

Sume Ndumbe-Eyoh, Senior Knowledge Translation Specialist, NCCDH Nancy Laliberte, Indigenous health consultant and PhD student, University of British Columbia 


Click here to register

  • Presenters:
  • Nancy Laliberte, 
  • Sume Ndumbe-Eyoh
    Sume Ndumbe-Eyoh

    Sume Ndumbe-Eyoh, MHSc

    Senior Knowledge Translation Specialist

    Sume has professional experiences in equity-focused organizational and community development and change, social justice education, HIV/AIDS prevention, research, knowledge translation, evaluation and women's rights with local, provincial and global organizations. Sume has previously contributed to teams at the Program Training and Consultation Centre of the Smoke Free Ontario Strategy, the Regional Diversity Roundtable, Ontario HIV Treatment Network, Southern African AIDS Trust and the Centre for Social Justice. Sume holds a Masters of Health Sciences in Health Promotion and Global Health from the University of Toronto.

    seyoh@stfx.ca

Event: Exploring Indigenous and Black Peoples Solidarities in Health

This event will take place in English.

This event has been postponed due to concerns regarding COVID-19 and public health recommendations on social distancing and mass gatherings. We are exploring alternative formats for the gathering. Please register to stay informed about any related developments.

This gathering is hosted by the Black Public Health Students’ Collective, the National Collaborating Centre for Determinants of Health and the San’yas Indigenous Cultural Safety Training program.

Join us for a gathering of Indigenous and/or Black health practitioners, researchers and learners.

March 25, 2020
5:30–8:30 p.m. (ET)
Location: TBC
Toronto, ON

Note: Registration is required for this free event. TOPHC 2020 registration is not required.

Indigenous and/or Black practitioners, researchers and learners have identified the need for knowledge exchange, support and network development that speaks to their unique experiences of settler colonialism and/or anti-Blackness in the context of health practice.

This gathering will provide an exclusive, brave space for Indigenous and/or Black Peoples to speak their realities; share their expertise, hopes and aspirations; and create opportunities for solidarity and support. This gathering will provide a forum for dialogue responsive to the needs of participants.

Building on two successful gatherings of Indigenous Peoples and Black Peoples held in Toronto and Ottawa and work on Black resistance in health, this gathering will feature leading voices in Black-Indigenous solidarities.

Specifically, it will:

  • explore the complexities and possibilities of Black and Indigenous solidarities; and
  • provide space for relationship building, peer support and mentorship.

For more information please contact Sume Ndumbe-Eyoh, senior knowledge translation specialist (seyoh@stfx.ca)

 

Click here to register

  • Presenters:
  • Sume Ndumbe-Eyoh
    Sume Ndumbe-Eyoh

    Sume Ndumbe-Eyoh, MHSc

    Senior Knowledge Translation Specialist

    Sume has professional experiences in equity-focused organizational and community development and change, social justice education, HIV/AIDS prevention, research, knowledge translation, evaluation and women's rights with local, provincial and global organizations. Sume has previously contributed to teams at the Program Training and Consultation Centre of the Smoke Free Ontario Strategy, the Regional Diversity Roundtable, Ontario HIV Treatment Network, Southern African AIDS Trust and the Centre for Social Justice. Sume holds a Masters of Health Sciences in Health Promotion and Global Health from the University of Toronto.

    seyoh@stfx.ca

Health Equity Clicks: Conversation: Is it really “us” versus “them”? How stigma affects health inequities

This conversation will take place in English and French.

Canada’s chief public health officer (CPHO) recently released a report titled Addressing stigma: towards a more inclusive health system, which describes the impact of stigma on health through multiple pathways.

Drawing from this publication, we are asking you, the members of Health Equity Clicks: Community, to reflect on the topic of stigma, how it interferes with public health action to address health inequities, and how it can be mitigated/challenged within the context of public health work.

In this online discussion, we will highlight the CPHO report and explore what public health actors can do to address the role of stigma in our work.

 

Click here to log in or create your account

  • Presenters:

Livestream: Black life, black liberation and the climate crisis

This event will take place in English.

This event is presented in partnership between the National Collaborating Centre for Determinants of Health (NCCDH) and St. Francis Xavier University’s Department of Sociology.

This livestreamed lecture will feature Robyn Maynard, author of Policing black lives: State violence in Canada from slavery to the present (2017), as part of St. Francis Xavier University’s Dr. Agnes Calliste African Heritage Lecture Series. Maynard’s presentation will focus on the relationship between the experiences of Black peoples and the reality of climate change. 

The lecture will also include a performance from an Antigonish, NS– based African drumming group and the presentation of the StFX Black Leaders Awards.


Presenter

Robyn Maynard
Robyn Maynard, author, activist and educator


This livestream has ended.

Webinar: Applying a health equity lens to program planning

This webinar took place in English. Click here to access the recording (English only).

This webinar was co-hosted by the National Collaborating Centre for Determinants of Health (NCCDH) and the National Collaborating Centre for Methods and Tools (NCCMT).

Program planning is one of the core roles of public health and community organizations, establishing clear direction, priorities and methods for measuring success. Tools and frameworks for program planning provide essential supports to organizations wishing to address the social determinants of health and health equity at a community and population level.

In addition, existing processes can be strengthened to address health equity through the incorporation of additional tools or “lenses” that cue practitioners to identify key elements necessary to address health inequities.


Community planning tool

This webinar explores the Community planning tool: Applying a health equity lens to program planning resource available from Fraser Health Authority in British Columbia. The resource serves as an example of how to apply a health equity lens to complement current program planning practices.

We discuss the resource’s seven planning steps, which are:

  • assessing inequities;
  • developing partnerships;
  • engaging community;
  • selecting approaches;
  • implementation and monitoring;
  • progress assessment; and
  • maintaining momentum.

Speakers reflect on practical examples where this tool has been applied and offer guidance on how to approach each of these steps. This tool is of interest to frontline practitioners and leaders at all levels of the public health system, especially program managers and directors, as well as community-based organizations.


Listeners will learn about: 

  • seven steps to program planning with a health equity lens;
  • applying this tool to current program planning and implementation processes; and
  • the practical application of a multi-step process for addressing health equity through community and public health programs.


Speakers

DIanne Oickle
DIanne Oickle, Knowledge Translation Specialist, NCCDH Kristin Read, Research Coordinator, NCCMT
Meghan Martin,
Regional Immunization Leader, Fraser Health Authority
Samantha Tong, Team Lead, Health Equity and Population Health Unit, Fraser Health Authority


Related resources

Community planning tool: Applying a health equity lens to program planning Self-Evaluation Tool for Action in Partnership Simcoe Muskoka District Health Unit’s approach to addressing the determinants of health: A health equity framework
Community planning tool: Applying a health equity lens to program planning (2018)
Health equity impact assessment (HEIA) tool Webinar: Health-in-all policies as a health promotion strategy Webinar recording: Contrasting entry points for intervention in health promotion practice

 

Click here to access the recording (English only)

  • Presenters:
  • Meghan Martin, Samantha Tong, Kristin Read, 
  • Dianne Oickle
    Dianne Oickle

    Dianne Oickle, MSc, BSc

    Knowledge Translation Specialist

    Dianne is a dietitian with over 15 years’ experience working in public health in Ontario focused on reproductive and child health in a mostly rural setting with many diverse clients. Part of her work involved development of practice guidelines for health professionals, train-the-trainer initiatives, public presentations, educational resource development, working with the media, community coalition and network support, writing for the public and professionals, and program planning, implementation, and evaluation. She has taught university nutrition courses, worked with the provincial network supporting and advocating for dietitians in public health practice, and precepted over 20 dietetics and other students. Dianne earned her BSc in Nutrition and Consumer Studies (now Human Nutrition) at St. Francis Xavier University, and her MSc in Nutrition from the University of Saskatchewan.

    doickle@stfx.ca

Webinar: Advocacy and government relations: Strategies from the field

This webinar took place in English. Click here to access the recording (English only).

This webinar is co-hosted by the National Collaborating Centre for Determinants of Health (NCCDH) and the Canadian Nurses Association.

As noted in the Ottawa Charter (1986), advocacy is a key action to promote health. It is also a core public health role, in particular when participating in the development of policy to improve health equity. Advocacy offers an entry point for effecting systemic change to address the social determinants of health and promote health equity. It also assists us to translate individual experiences to broader social concerns (NCCDH, 2015a: 5). It can be approached in different ways depending on the type of action we seek (NCCDH, 2015a: 2).

The most impactful advocacy occurs when partners from varying backgrounds come together to amplify their resources and political power (NCCDH, 2015a: 4). This includes partners from the government sector. Influencing public and government policy is the aim of government relations and involves advocating for something influenced or affected by government leaders.


Government relations

This webinar provides insight into the world of government relations in the context of advocating for health equity. The event includes a broad overview of what government relations are and how they work, as well as describing how the Canadian Nurses Association (CNA) advocates to the federal government on behalf of nurses and people living in Canada.

The webinar highlights some of CNA’s current government relations and advocacy activities, wins and lessons learned. Speakers share best practices and tips to prepare you for advocacy and government relations efforts in your community or jurisdiction.


Listeners will learn about

  • what government relations and advocacy entails
  • how to engage politicians and government decision makers through various government relations activities and advocacy; and
  • CNA’s advocacy role and work to promote health equity
  • how to get involved and support CNA’s advocacy efforts.


Speakers

Michael Villeneuve Sarah Nolan
Dr. Claire Betker, RN, MN, CCHN(C), Scientific Director, NCCDH; President, Canadian Nurses Association Michael Villeneuve, RN, M.Sc., FAAN, Chief Executive Officer, Canadian Nurses Association Sarah Nolan, Acting Program Lead, Policy and Government Relations, Canadian Nurses Association


Related resources:

NCCDH: Let's Talk: Advocacy and health equity NCCDH: Let's Talk: Public health roles for improving health equity NCCDH: Key public health resources for advocacy and health equity: A curated list
Let’s Talk: Advocacy and health equity (2015a) Let's Talk: Public health roles for improving health equity (2013) Key public health resources for advocacy and health equity: A curated list (2015b)


Click here to access the recording (English only)

  • Presenters:
  • Michael Villeneuve, Sarah Nolan, 
  • Claire Betker
    Claire Betker

    Claire Betker, RN, MN, CCHN(C), PHD

    Scientific Director

    Claire arrived on March 4, 2019, as the NCCDH’s scientific director. A registered nurse, she was most recently the acting Executive Director of the Population and Public Health Branch with Manitoba Health, Seniors and Active Living. Her career has included roles in rural public health and home health, primary health care, a regional health authority and the Public Health Agency of Canada, as well as previously serving as a senior knowledge translation specialist with the NCCDH. Claire is currently the president of the Canadian Nurses Association and a past president of the Community Health Nurses of Canada. Her PhD work focused on the capacity for public health leadership to advance health equity, a knowledge base that greatly informs her contributions to the NCCDH and the public health field. Claire brings a wealth of expertise, rich networks and a passion to translate knowledge and evidence, especially to position public health to advance health equity.

    cbetker@stfx.ca

Webinar: Disruptive opportunities to enhance capacity for equity-oriented action in the health sector

This webinar took place in English. Click here to access the recording (English only).

As part of the Organizational Capacity for Health Equity Action initiative, the NCCDH is hosting a series of webinars to discuss ways to strengthen organizational capacity for health equity. The webinar series is based on evidence, learning circle discussions and experiences of the two public health organizations implementing organizational change projects. This is the fifth webinar in the series.

Equity-oriented action in the health sector is often perceived and experienced as disruptive because it seeks to shift power and transform how organizations and systems function. When disruptive opportunities are nurtured, practitioners and decision-makers have the space to reflect on the structures and systems that manifest health inequities and reimagine practice and policy.

We draw on examples from the organizational health equity intervention known as EQUIP Health Care. The EQUIP Health Care intervention is based on three key dimensions for enacting equity-oriented healthcare:

  • Culturally Safe Care
  • Trauma- and Violence-Informed Care [TVIC]
  • Harm Reduction

Each dimension must be contextually tailored to fit local settings.


Psychological safety

This webinar explores the idea of psychological safety and its potential to strengthen capacity for health equity actions within organizations. The promotion of psychological safety contributes to these aims by supporting the interpersonal risk-taking and courage needed for work in health equity. Leadership plays a critical role in framing disruption as opportunities for action.

Speakers discuss practical strategies that support practitioners to challenge inequity-generating practices and processes. These strategies are also meant to help practitioners move beyond usual ways of working to support equity-oriented approaches.


Listeners will learn about

  • disruptive actions that can be viewed as opportunities to enhance capacity for health equity action; and
  • the role of leaders in supporting conditions and contexts for implementing equity-oriented actions in public health and other settings.


Speakers

Click here to access the recoring (English).

  • Presenters:
  • Katrina Plamondon, Annette Browne, 
  • Sume Ndumbe-Eyoh
    Sume Ndumbe-Eyoh

    Sume Ndumbe-Eyoh, MHSc

    Senior Knowledge Translation Specialist

    Sume has professional experiences in equity-focused organizational and community development and change, social justice education, HIV/AIDS prevention, research, knowledge translation, evaluation and women's rights with local, provincial and global organizations. Sume has previously contributed to teams at the Program Training and Consultation Centre of the Smoke Free Ontario Strategy, the Regional Diversity Roundtable, Ontario HIV Treatment Network, Southern African AIDS Trust and the Centre for Social Justice. Sume holds a Masters of Health Sciences in Health Promotion and Global Health from the University of Toronto.

    seyoh@stfx.ca

Webinar: Disrupting the colour-coded labour market: Implications for public health organizations

This webinar took place in English. Click here to access the recording (English only).

Systemic racism, employment and income are key factors that influence the health of communities. What happens at the intersections of racism and work?

The “colour-coded” labour market in Canada is such that employment and income inequities persist along racial and gender lines. Systemic racism at different points of the employment cycle (e.g., type of work, recruitment, hiring, retention and promotion) significantly contribute to racial and gender inequities in employment and income.


Racial inequity in the public sector

Public sector organizations, including public health, can play a role in assessing and eliminating racial inequities in employment, starting from where they have the most direct locus of control — within their own institutions. This can be done by directly engaging in racially equitable employment practices.

Effective organizational change and a range of workplace strategies exist to directly address racism and improve employment experiences and income. There are also a few emerging instances where these strategies have been implemented in public sector organizations.


Change in public health organizations

In their roles as employers, public health organizations are encouraged to reflect on how they engage with employment-related policies within their organizations, such as employment equity and anti-discrimination legislation.

The webinar:

  • discusses the relationship between racism, employment and income as determinants of health;
  • provides insight to the current state of affairs in Canada; and 
  • identifies how public health organizations can act to reduce racial inequities in employment, with a focus on how the public health sector can ‘walk the walk’ and address these inequities within their own four walls. 


Speakers

Fareen-Karachiwalla  
Sume Ndumbe-Eyoh, Senior Knowledge Translation Specialist, NCCDH
Dr. Fareen Karachiwalla, Associate Medical Officer of Health, Public Health, Community and Health Services Department, The Regional Municipality of York  


Related resources

Let's Talk: Racism and health equity Key public health resources for anti-racism action: A curated list Persistent Inequality: Ontario’s Colour-coded Labour Market


Click here to access the recording (English only).

  • Presenters:
  • Dr. Fareen Karachiwalla, 
  • Sume Ndumbe-Eyoh
    Sume Ndumbe-Eyoh

    Sume Ndumbe-Eyoh, MHSc

    Senior Knowledge Translation Specialist

    Sume has professional experiences in equity-focused organizational and community development and change, social justice education, HIV/AIDS prevention, research, knowledge translation, evaluation and women's rights with local, provincial and global organizations. Sume has previously contributed to teams at the Program Training and Consultation Centre of the Smoke Free Ontario Strategy, the Regional Diversity Roundtable, Ontario HIV Treatment Network, Southern African AIDS Trust and the Centre for Social Justice. Sume holds a Masters of Health Sciences in Health Promotion and Global Health from the University of Toronto.

    seyoh@stfx.ca

Webinar: Revisiting and reflecting on the NCCDH’s knowledge translation approaches

Click here to access the recording. Click here to access the presentation’s reference list.

 

In this one-hour presentation, former NCCDH Scientific Director Connie Clement draws on NCCDH experience, published literature and her career in public health to offer a critical analysis of the process of knowledge translation (KT) and explain NCCDH KT approaches.


Critiques of Knowledge Translation (KT)

The purpose of this webinar is to contextualize the challenges of doing and applying KT, especially as it relates to health equity and related public health practice.

Exploring KT’s positivist and clinical roots, Connie explains critiques of KT, from the metaphor of translation itself to the hierarchy of knowledges and voices that KT frequently reflects. In particular, she delves into how equity considerations are often sidelined in the KT process.


KT frameworks and models

Further on, Connie discusses some of the work the NCCDH has done in determining the suitability of KT frameworks and models:

  • to explain the conditions that lead to health equity and
  • to demonstrate effective action to practitioners.


The NCCDH’s approach to KT

From here, Connie explores the space the NCCDH occupies within the current public health KT landscape.

This includes some of the considerations the NCCDH makes in order to capture a wide range of knowledge sources, such as French-language content and resources relating to Indigenous knowledge.

She expands upon the NCCDH’s use of knowledge brokering, referencing some of the frameworks the Centre has used to shape its knowledge brokering work in the past.


Interactive KT model

Exploring the NCCDH’s own KT framework, she outlines how the work of Greenhalgh et al.’s 2004 dynamic and interactive KT model — which addresses linkages, user systems, resources and knowledge purveyors — applies to the Centre’s work.

 
Presenter

Connie Clement
Connie Clement, Associate and Scientific Director Emeritus, NCCDH


Related resources

The references cited in the webinar are available in a downloadable PDF list here.


Click here to access the recording (English only).

  • Presenters:
  • Connie Clement
    Connie Clement

    Connie Clement, BSc

    Scientific Director Emeritus

    Connie Clement joined the NCCDH in January 2011. Before working with the NCCDH, she spent nearly three decades at Toronto Public Health as director of policy and planning when six public health units merged, and held varied management and front-line health promotion and sexual health positions. Connie was also the executive director of Health Nexus/Nexus Santé, an Ontario-oriented health promotion organization, and of Social Venture Partners Toronto, a venture philanthropy collaborative; she was also managing editor and collective member of Women Healthsharing. Connie holds a BSc in Biology/Sociology from Trent University. Connie received the Canadian Public Health Association’s certificate of merit in 2014.

    cclement@stfx.ca

Webinar: Implications of health inequities for health promotion and public health policy

This webinar took place in English. Click here to access the recording (English only).

The National Collaborating Centre for Determinants of Health (NCCDH) and Health Promotion Canada (HPC) are collaborating on a series of webinars to highlight several chapters of the recently released book Health Promotion in Canada 4th edition: New Perspectives on Theory, Practice, Policy, and Research. The goal is to explore how various themes in this book apply to public health action on health equity by pairing the authors’ content with practitioner perspective on application to public health practice.  

Health promotion is a key strategy to address population health inequities and a core function of public health practice. Recognizing the importance of addressing the social and structural determinants of health, health promotion efforts are shifting towards public policy influences on population health inequities. These efforts are influenced by public policy changes and health system restructuring that can impact both population health inequities and practitioners’ ability to address them.


Health promotion practice

This webinar explores the status of health inequities in Canada and the implications for both health promotion practice and policy-level decisions. Speakers reflect on seven key approaches in health promotion practice directed towards reducing health inequities, with a focus on the influence of public policy and power structures.

The recording also includes a discussion of policy decisions around health system restructuring on inequities, as well as public health action to address these decisions. Practice-based examples, barriers to and opportunities for action by health promotion and public health professionals are also explored.  


Listeners will learn about:

  • key health promotion approaches directed towards addressing health inequities;
  • how inequities are rooted in public policy;
  • how health system reform can impact public health action on inequities; and
  • the influence of power structures on policies that impact inequities.


Speakers:

Dianne Oickle Dennis Raphael Sionnach Lukeman
Dianne Oickle,
Knowledge Translation Specialist,
NCCDH
Dennis Raphael, Professor, School of Health Policy and Management, York University  Sionnach Lukeman, Assistant Professor, Elizabeth and Thomas Rankin School of Nursing, St. Francis Xavier University

 

Related resources

Health Promotion in Canada Blog post: Moving forward in the midst of health care reform Organizational Capacity for Health Equity Action Initiative: Summary
Blog post: "Moving forward in the midst of public health reform" (2019) Organizational capacity for health equity action initiative: a brief description (2019)
Gaps analysis Environmental scan Common agenda
   
   


Click here to access the recording (English only)

Webinar: Governance and decision-making for health equity

This webinar took place in English. Click here to access the recording (English only).

As part of the Organizational Capacity for Health Equity Action Initiative, the NCCDH is hosting a series of webinars to discuss ways to strengthen organizational capacity for health equity. The webinar series is based on evidence, learning circle discussions and experiences of the two public health organizations implementing organizational change projects. This is the fourth webinar in the series.

Governance refers to the concepts of priority-setting, decision-making and the implementation of decisions.

Governance for action on health inequities and the social determinants of health takes into consideration a strong evidence base and effective data governance, the participation of affected communities, action across sectors, transparency and structures that enable the integration of health equity into institutional practices.

Good governance for action on health equity requires clarity regarding individual and joint responsibilities of different actors and sectors, effective leadership and a long-term commitment, among other needs.


Principles of good governance for health equity

This webinar explores principles of governance for health equity. It outlines some of the critical elements relevant to governance that support health equity action. Speakers discuss approaches to data governance. The webinar also highlights strategies for effective health equity governance and additional resources for information and guidance.


Listeners will learn about

  • principles and key elements of governance for health equity;
  • common approaches to data governance; and
  • tips for applying key elements of governance for health equity to organizational work.


Speakers

Sume Ndumbe Eyoh Jodi Bruhn
Sume Ndumbe Eyoh, Senior Knowledge Translation Specialist, NCCDH
Jodi Bruhn, Director, Stratéjuste Consulting


Related resources

"Identifying useful approaches to the governance of Indigenous data" (2014) Powering health equity action within online data tools: 10 design principles (2017) Governance for health equity (2014)


Click here to access the recording (English only)

  • Presenters:
  • Jodi Bruhn, 
  • Sume Ndumbe-Eyoh
    Sume Ndumbe-Eyoh

    Sume Ndumbe-Eyoh, MHSc

    Senior Knowledge Translation Specialist

    Sume has professional experiences in equity-focused organizational and community development and change, social justice education, HIV/AIDS prevention, research, knowledge translation, evaluation and women's rights with local, provincial and global organizations. Sume has previously contributed to teams at the Program Training and Consultation Centre of the Smoke Free Ontario Strategy, the Regional Diversity Roundtable, Ontario HIV Treatment Network, Southern African AIDS Trust and the Centre for Social Justice. Sume holds a Masters of Health Sciences in Health Promotion and Global Health from the University of Toronto.

    seyoh@stfx.ca

Webinar: Informing public health programs through engagement with communities that live with health inequities

This event took place in English. Click here to access the recording (English only).

Community engagement (CE) is an important step towards understanding the unique circumstances facing populations living with inequities. This is especially true when considering these communities’ opportunities and barriers to achieving health.   

Having authentic and ongoing relationships with communities that experience marginalization – beyond one-time engagement events or client satisfaction – requires eliminating processes and practices that make decisions for those communities without their direct and meaningful involvement.


Community engagement (CE) skills

For public health practitioners, the skills, resources and tools for meaningful and participatory CE are beneficial for informing decision-making on actions to address health inequities.  

This webinar explores CE as a strategy to reduce the marginalization of populations most impacted by health equities. Speakers reflect on the necessary shift from seeing the community as more than just a target audience for service delivery to drawing on them as a resource to inform public health priorities. It also explores practice-based examples, barriers to and opportunities for CE, ways to establish and maintain engagement with community members and stakeholders, and the importance of evaluating CE. 


Listeners will learn about: 

  • mechanisms to develop and support relationship-building and community engagement to address health inequities;
  • examples of short- and long-term practices to engage communities that experience inequities; and
  • strategies to increase community influence on public health program decision-making.


Speakers: 

Dianne Oickle, Knowledge Translation Specialist, NCCDH Heather Chase, Community Developer, Horizon Health Network Nancy Stewart, Health Promoter, Public Health Services, Nova Scotia Health Authority


Related resources

 
 


Click here to access the recording (English only)

  • Presenters:
  • Heather Chase, Nancy Stewart, 
  • Dianne Oickle
    Dianne Oickle

    Dianne Oickle, MSc, BSc

    Knowledge Translation Specialist

    Dianne is a dietitian with over 15 years’ experience working in public health in Ontario focused on reproductive and child health in a mostly rural setting with many diverse clients. Part of her work involved development of practice guidelines for health professionals, train-the-trainer initiatives, public presentations, educational resource development, working with the media, community coalition and network support, writing for the public and professionals, and program planning, implementation, and evaluation. She has taught university nutrition courses, worked with the provincial network supporting and advocating for dietitians in public health practice, and precepted over 20 dietetics and other students. Dianne earned her BSc in Nutrition and Consumer Studies (now Human Nutrition) at St. Francis Xavier University, and her MSc in Nutrition from the University of Saskatchewan.

    doickle@stfx.ca

Webinar: L’approche écologique pour planifier et réaliser des interventions en matière de promotion de la santé (Building and implementing ecological health promotion interventions)

This webinar took place in French. Click here to access the recording.

The National Collaborating Centre for Determinants of Health (NCCDH) and Health Promotion Canada (HPC) are collaborating on a series of webinars to highlight several chapters of the newly released book Health Promotion in Canada 4th edition: New Perspectives on Theory, Practice, Policy, and Research. The goal is to explore how various themes in this book apply to public health action on health equity by pairing the authors’ content with practitioner perspective on application to public health practice.

The ecological approach to health promotion offers a research and action framework that emphasizes the complex interactions between people and their environment. Ecological health promotion interventions and programs “integrate people-focused efforts to modify health behaviours with interventions that will enhance the numerous dimensions of the environment: physical, social, cultural” (Health Promotion in Canada, 2017, p. 85).

While intrapersonal factors still remain key targets for action, the focus is on changing the environments which determine the choices that people can make that shape their health.


Unpacking the ecological approach to health promotion

This webinar explores the ecological approach to health promotion as a strategy to reorient public health programs and services and to impact population health inequities. Facilitators and challenges to the implementation of an ecological approach are discussed, including practice-based considerations at the individual, group, organization and community levels of implementation.

The recording highlights relevant research, position papers and other resources, including program examples that integrate an ecological approach to addressing population health. Considerations for how an ecological approach to health promotion programs can influence and are influenced by the social determinants of health are also explored.


Listeners will learn about

  • concepts of ecological health promotion;
  • facilitators and challenges to the planning, implementation, and evaluation of ecological health promotion interventions;
  • practice-based scenarios demonstrating implementation of an ecological approach; and
  • how social determinants intersect with ecological determinants to influence health equity.


Speakers

Pemma Muzumdar,
Knowledge Translation Specialist, NCCDH
Josée Lapalme, 
PhD candidate, Département de médecine sociale et préventive, École de santé publique de l’Université de Montréal;
Quebec representative, Health Promotion Canada
Lucie Richard, 
Professor, Faculté des sciences infirmières, University of Montreal; Researcher, IRSPUM
Lise Gauvin, Associate Dean of Research, École de santé publique de l’Université de Montréal
 
Anne Pelletier, 
Planning, Programming and Research Agent,
Direction régionale de santé publique du CIUSSS du Centre-Sud de Montréal
 

 

Related resources

Health Promotion in Canda NCCDH climate change webinar
Health Promotion in Canada, 4th edition (2017) Webinar: Climate change, public health and equity (2019)
Advocacy for health equity Health inequalities and the social determinants of Aboriginal peoples' health
Advocacy for health equity: Environmental racism (2017) Health inequalities and the social determinants of Aboriginal peoples' health (2013)
Ecological Determinants Group on Education (EDGE)  
The Canadian Public Health Association’s Ecological Determinants Group on Education (EDGE)  

 

Click here to access the recording (French only).
 

 

Other related webinars in this series include:

  • Presenters:
  • Josée Lapalme, Lucie Richard, Lise Gauvin, Anne Pelletier, 
  • Pemma Muzumdar
    Pemma Muzumdar

    Pemma Muzumdar, MPH

    Knowledge Translation Specialist

    Pemma Muzumdar is motivated by a desire to improve well-being and planetary health, particularly those who, through intersecting factors, experience marginalization and exclusion. She is based out of Montreal, Quebec.

    Pemma has worked with the six National Collaborating Centres (NCCs) for Public Health in various capacities since 2011, developing and sharing knowledge, networks and resources for improved public health action. She completed her Masters of Public Health at the University of Waterloo in 2010, and draws from significant experience in science communication, public speaking, group facilitation, team learning and organizational development. Prior to joining the NCCs, Pemma contributed to dynamic teams at the Ontario Science Centre, Discovery Channel Canada, the Program Training and Consultation Centre of the Smoke Free Ontario Strategy, TakingITGlobal and the Li Ka Shing Knowledge Institute at St. Michael’s Hospital.

    pmuzumd@stfx.ca

Webinar: Living health equity values within public health organizations

This webinar took place in English. Click here to access the recording (English only).

As part of the Organizational Capacity for Health Equity Action Initiative, the NCCDH is hosting a series of webinars to discuss ways to strengthen organizational capacity for health equity. The webinar series is based on evidence, learning circle discussions and experiences of the two public health organizations implementing organizational change projects. This is the third webinar in the series.

Organizational values influence policies and practices that can support or hinder health equity action. There is a certain set of values that underpin health equity action, some of which are explicit and obvious, and others that are implicit.

These values include the core values of social justice, solidarity, reciprocity and fair distribution of power, as well as other values such as trust, respect for the environment and affordability. These values play an important role in enabling public health action focused on health equity.


Organizational health equity values

Personal and societal values guide organizational work on the social determinants of health and health equity. This webinar reviews the organizational values that reflect an equity orientation. It explores how organizations can successfully shift their values to more closely align with those supportive of health equity action. Shifting organizational culture depends on a close alignment between the personal values of staff members and the desired values of the organization.

Each individual working at an organization arrives with a set of values that has varying degrees of overlap with other staff members and that helps shape the organization's value system. However, not all individuals influence the organization's values to the same extent. The leaders of an organization play a key role in sustaining and reinforcing values within their organization. An organization's values can, in turn, support or detract from health equity action when they influence the goals and priorities of policies and practices.

In short, the sociopolitical context of an organization is critical in directing its ethical commitments. This webinar reviews strategies for assessing and shifting organizational values to support health equity action.


Listeners will learn about

  • the values that reflect health equity;
  • how to assess the values inherent in existing organizational policies and practices; and
  • strategies for shifting organizational values to support health equity action.


Speakers

Sume Ndumbe-Eyoh, Senior Knowledge Translation Specialist, NCCDH Claire Betker, Scientific Director, NCCDH


Related resources

Shifting moral values to enhance access to health care: Harm reduction as a context for ethical nursing practice (2008) Winnipeg Regional Health Authority 2016–2021 Strategic Plan (2015)
Disruption as opportunity: Impacts of an organizational health equity intervention in primary care clinics (2018) Public health nursing practice and ethical challenges (2006)


Click here to access the recording (English only)

  • Presenters:
  • Sume Ndumbe-Eyoh
    Sume Ndumbe-Eyoh

    Sume Ndumbe-Eyoh, MHSc

    Senior Knowledge Translation Specialist

    Sume has professional experiences in equity-focused organizational and community development and change, social justice education, HIV/AIDS prevention, research, knowledge translation, evaluation and women's rights with local, provincial and global organizations. Sume has previously contributed to teams at the Program Training and Consultation Centre of the Smoke Free Ontario Strategy, the Regional Diversity Roundtable, Ontario HIV Treatment Network, Southern African AIDS Trust and the Centre for Social Justice. Sume holds a Masters of Health Sciences in Health Promotion and Global Health from the University of Toronto.

    seyoh@stfx.ca
  • Claire Betker
    Claire Betker

    Claire Betker, RN, MN, CCHN(C), PHD

    Scientific Director

    Claire arrived on March 4, 2019, as the NCCDH’s scientific director. A registered nurse, she was most recently the acting Executive Director of the Population and Public Health Branch with Manitoba Health, Seniors and Active Living. Her career has included roles in rural public health and home health, primary health care, a regional health authority and the Public Health Agency of Canada, as well as previously serving as a senior knowledge translation specialist with the NCCDH. Claire is currently the president of the Canadian Nurses Association and a past president of the Community Health Nurses of Canada. Her PhD work focused on the capacity for public health leadership to advance health equity, a knowledge base that greatly informs her contributions to the NCCDH and the public health field. Claire brings a wealth of expertise, rich networks and a passion to translate knowledge and evidence, especially to position public health to advance health equity.

    cbetker@stfx.ca

Event: Indigenous and Black Peoples public health gathering

The gathering is hosted by the National Collaborating Centre for Determinants of Health with the support of the Canadian Public Health Association and the San’yas Indigenous Cultural Safety Training program.

         

 

This event will take place in English.

Join us for a gathering of Indigenous and Black public health practitioners and researchers at Public Health 2019.

 

Public Health 2019 Indigenous and Black Peoples public health gathering

Wednesday, May 1, 2019
5:30–7:30 p.m. (ET)
Public Health 2019 Conference
Shaw Centre, Room 202
55 Colonel By Drive
Ottawa, ON

Note: Registration is required for this free event. PH 2019 registration is not required.

This gathering will provide an exclusive, safe space for Indigenous and Black Peoples to speak their realities, share their expertise, hopes and aspirations and create opportunities for solidarity and support.
More public health organizations are making a concerted effort to address the impact of racism on health and well-being.

For example:

Indigenous and Black practitioners have identified the need for knowledge exchange, support, and network development that speaks to their unique experiences of settler colonialism or anti-Blackness in the context of public health practice. This gathering will provide a forum for open discussion responsive to the needs of participants.


Planning team

For more information please contact Sume Ndumbe-Eyoh, senior knowledge translation specialist (seyoh@stfx.ca).

 

Click here to register.

  • Presenters:
  • Sume Ndumbe-Eyoh
    Sume Ndumbe-Eyoh

    Sume Ndumbe-Eyoh, MHSc

    Senior Knowledge Translation Specialist

    Sume has professional experiences in equity-focused organizational and community development and change, social justice education, HIV/AIDS prevention, research, knowledge translation, evaluation and women's rights with local, provincial and global organizations. Sume has previously contributed to teams at the Program Training and Consultation Centre of the Smoke Free Ontario Strategy, the Regional Diversity Roundtable, Ontario HIV Treatment Network, Southern African AIDS Trust and the Centre for Social Justice. Sume holds a Masters of Health Sciences in Health Promotion and Global Health from the University of Toronto.

    seyoh@stfx.ca

Resources in our Library:

Event: Indigenous and Black peoples public health gathering

The gathering is hosted by the National Collaborating Centre for Determinants of Health with the support of the Ontario Public Health Association.

This event will take place in English.

Join us for a gathering of Indigenous and Black public health practitioners and researchers at The Ontario Public Health Convention (TOPHC) 2019


TOPHC 2019 Indigenous and Black peoples public health gathering

March 27, 2019
5:00–7:00 p.m. (ET)
Beanfield Centre, Room 204C
100 Princes' Blvd, Suite 1
Toronto, ON

Note: Registration is required for this free event. TOPHC registration is not required. 


Over the last few years, more public health organizations are making a concerted effort to address the impact of racism on health and well-being.

For example:

Alongside these activities, Indigenous and Black practitioners have identified the need for knowledge exchange, support and network development that speaks to the unique experiences of settler colonialism and anti-Blackness in the context of public health practice.

This gathering provides a space to discuss relationships between Indigenous and Black peoples and opportunities for solidarity and support.


Planning team

Mariette Sutherland,
Public Health Sudbury and Districts
Samiya Abdi,
Public Health Ontario
Shana Calixte,
Public Health Sudbury and Districts
Sume Ndumbe-Eyoh, NCCDH


For more information please contact Sume Ndumbe-Eyoh (seyoh@stfx.ca).
 

Click here to register.

Resources in our Library:

Webinar: Action on health equity through early childhood development programs, measurement and policy

This webinar will take place in English.

Conditions in early childhood shape our health at all stages of the life course. In Canada, health inequities in early childhood (generally referred to as 0–6 years of age) are experienced the most by children who are Indigenous, living in poverty and surrounded by unhealthy physical and social environments, and who may also be unable to access adequate services and supports.

These children are also more likely to experience inequities that influence their health at subsequent stages throughout their life. For this reason, in order to influence the health of the population at later stages of life, addressing the conditions in early childhood that affect health inequities is critical.


Early childhood health inequities

This webinar will look at the intersection of physical and social conditions in early childhood and how they influence health outcomes across the life course. Early childhood development programs using a proportionate universality approach will be discussed, including issues of access, resource allocation and implementation. Measurement of early childhood outcomes will also be explored, including how data can be used to inform early childhood program priorities for public health.

Two key research projects will be profiled: PATHS Equity for Children (University of Manitoba) and the Human Early Learning Partnership (HELP) (University of British Columbia). The findings of this research are applicable to public health policy decisions across Canada and can translate to actionable items by practitioners at all levels of the public health system.


Participants will learn about

  • the influence of early childhood conditions on health across the life course;
  • measurement of program outcomes to inform policy decisions and resource allocation;
  • key areas of policy focus related to early childhood that can influence health equity across the life course; and
  • multisectoral partners who can work together to collectively influence early childhood health outcomes.


Speakers

Dianne Oickle, Knowledge Translation Specialist, NCCDH Mariette Chartier,
Senior Research Scientist, Manitoba Centre for Health Policy, University of Manitoba
Marni Brownell,
Associate Director, Research and Senior Research Scientist,
Manitoba Centre for Health Policy, University of Manitoba
Pippa Rowcliffe,
Deputy Director, Centre for Population Health Promotion Research, Human Early Learning Partnership (HELP)


Upcoming community discussion thread on March 11–15

We will also be hosting an online conversation on this topic in the Health Equity Clicks: Community titled Public health action to address early childhood health inequities (March 11–15). 

Please join us to engage in discussion and resource sharing to explore the following questions:

  1. How does the experience of health inequities in the early childhood period influence health outcomes across the life course?
  2. What is the role of public health to shape policy and engage multisectoral partners to address the roots of early child health inequities?

Click here to create a free account.


Related resources

Economic arguments for shifting health dollars upstream (2016) Foundations: Definitions and concepts to frame population mental health promotion for children and youth (2017) The health of Canada’s children and youth: a CICH profile (2018)
Learning from practice: targeting within universalism (2014) Antoinette’s story: An introduction to an early child development model of care and post-natal home visiting scenario (2012) Environmental scan of school readiness for health (2012)

 

Click here to register.

  • Presenters:
  • Mariette Chartier, Marni Brownell, Pippa Rowcliffe, 
  • Dianne Oickle
    Dianne Oickle

    Dianne Oickle, MSc, BSc

    Knowledge Translation Specialist

    Dianne is a dietitian with over 15 years’ experience working in public health in Ontario focused on reproductive and child health in a mostly rural setting with many diverse clients. Part of her work involved development of practice guidelines for health professionals, train-the-trainer initiatives, public presentations, educational resource development, working with the media, community coalition and network support, writing for the public and professionals, and program planning, implementation, and evaluation. She has taught university nutrition courses, worked with the provincial network supporting and advocating for dietitians in public health practice, and precepted over 20 dietetics and other students. Dianne earned her BSc in Nutrition and Consumer Studies (now Human Nutrition) at St. Francis Xavier University, and her MSc in Nutrition from the University of Saskatchewan.

    doickle@stfx.ca

Webinar: Increasing the success of health equity change initiatives: Organizational enablers and barriers

This webinar took place in English. Click here to access the recording (English only).

As part of the Organizational Capacity for Health Equity Action initiative, the NCCDH is hosting a series of webinars to discuss ways to strengthen organizational capacity for health equity. The webinar series is based on evidence, learning circle discussions and experiences of the two public health organizations implementing organizational change projects. This is the second webinar in the series.

Organizations seeking to improve their capacity to address health equity are encouraged to understand the broad barriers, enablers and success factors for successful change.

The Organizational Capacity Initiative adopts Klarner et al's conceptual model for change capacity as a basis for examining the capacity of public health organizations' to change when adopting health equity approaches. This conceptual model integrates capacity for change into change management theory (Klarner, P et al, 2007) and has previously been applied to organization-wide change at the World Health Organization (Klarner, P et al, 2008). In this model, as well as in the wider literature, change is characterized in several ways that are essential to properly understanding and effecting organizational change capacity.

This webinar reviews key concepts related to an organization's ability to successfully implement health equity change initiatives. It also explores dichotomies such as managerially induced (internal) versus environmentally induced (external) change and proactive versus reactive change.


The capacity of an organization to change

The Organizational Capacity for Health Equity Action Initiative is exploring ways in which public health organizations can develop their change capacity to introduce a health equity lens in their work.

This webinar is primarily intended for leaders, managers, working groups and anyone involved in health equity change programs. It will most benefit those who are responsible for operationalizing work around health equity and organizational change initiatives.


Participants will learn about

  • essential concepts and practices to support successful health equity change initiatives;
  • examples of how to apply Klarner et al's conceptual model to effecting organization-wide change; and
  • how to develop a process that is built collectively with internal stakeholders (e.g. staff, managers, leaders)


Speakers

Sume Ndumbe-Eyoh,
Senior Knowledge Translation Specialist, NCCDH
Samiya Abdi, Senior Program Specialist, Public Health Ontario


Related resources

The Path Taken: Developing organizational capacity for improving health equity in four Ontario health units (2015) Building your capacity to facilitate health equity action: Learning pathways for public health middle managers (pending) Advancing provincial and territorial public health capacity for health equity: Proceedings (2015)

 

Click here to access the recording (English only).

  • Presenters:
  • Samiya Abdi, 
  • Sume Ndumbe-Eyoh
    Sume Ndumbe-Eyoh

    Sume Ndumbe-Eyoh, MHSc

    Senior Knowledge Translation Specialist

    Sume has professional experiences in equity-focused organizational and community development and change, social justice education, HIV/AIDS prevention, research, knowledge translation, evaluation and women's rights with local, provincial and global organizations. Sume has previously contributed to teams at the Program Training and Consultation Centre of the Smoke Free Ontario Strategy, the Regional Diversity Roundtable, Ontario HIV Treatment Network, Southern African AIDS Trust and the Centre for Social Justice. Sume holds a Masters of Health Sciences in Health Promotion and Global Health from the University of Toronto.

    seyoh@stfx.ca

Webinar: Climate change, public health and equity

This webinar took place in English. Click here to acces the recording (English only).

This webinar was cohosted by the OPHA/alPHa Health Equity Workgroup, the OPHA Environmental Health Workgroup and the National Collaborating Centre for Determinants of Health (NCCDH).

Climate change has a dramatic and real effect on population health. The risks and impact of climate change do not affect all segments of the population equally. Some groups that are already at a disadvantage due to structural inequities, such as those living with low income and inadequate housing, are more vulnerable and may have fewer resources to respond to the negative impacts of climate change on their physical and social environments.

For the same systemic reasons, marginalized populations are more likely to already have poorer health, thereby experiencing more severe negative health effects and weakened ability to recover from events related to climate change.


Climate change guide for local health departments

The goal of this webinar is to bring a public health voice to the issue of climate change, focusing particularly on the issue’s relationship to health equity at the local public health level. A recent document has been released through the Public Health Institute Center for Climate Change and Health and the American Public Health Association titled Climate change, health, and equity: A guide for local health departments.

This guide provides an overview of how climate change influences health, the equity perspective of specific climate change impacts, and core public health actions at the local level that integrate addressing climate change and population health inequities.


Listeners will learn about

  • describing the effects of climate change on population health and health inequities;
  • relating how existing public health programs can impact and be impacted by climate change; and
  • identifying multisectoral approaches and core public health functions that relate to addressing health inequities impacted by climate change. 


Speakers

Dianne Oickle, 
Knowledge Translation Specialist, NCCDH
Linda Rudolph, Director, Public Health Institute Center for Climate Change and Health
Monika Dutt,
Medical Officer of Health and CEO,
Timiskaming Health Unit
Helen Doyle,
Chair, Ontario Public Health Association's Environmental Health Work Group


Resources

Climate change, health, and equity: A guide for local health departments (2018) Learning from Practice: Advocacy for health equity - Environmental racism (2017) Developing a health-focused communication strategy for climate messaging (2018)

 

Click here to access the webinar (English only).

  • Presenters:
  • Linda Rudolph, Monika Dutt, Helen Doyle, 
  • Dianne Oickle
    Dianne Oickle

    Dianne Oickle, MSc, BSc

    Knowledge Translation Specialist

    Dianne is a dietitian with over 15 years’ experience working in public health in Ontario focused on reproductive and child health in a mostly rural setting with many diverse clients. Part of her work involved development of practice guidelines for health professionals, train-the-trainer initiatives, public presentations, educational resource development, working with the media, community coalition and network support, writing for the public and professionals, and program planning, implementation, and evaluation. She has taught university nutrition courses, worked with the provincial network supporting and advocating for dietitians in public health practice, and precepted over 20 dietetics and other students. Dianne earned her BSc in Nutrition and Consumer Studies (now Human Nutrition) at St. Francis Xavier University, and her MSc in Nutrition from the University of Saskatchewan.

    doickle@stfx.ca

Workshops: Shifting towards a culture of racial equity in the Ontario public health system

This series is available in English only.

The NCCDH is offering a series of Ontario-based, English-language workshops through the Public Health Training for Equitable Systems Change (PHESC) project.

These in-person events will help participants better understand how to apply the requirements of the Ontario Public Health Standards and the Ontario Health Equity Guideline, 2018 (Guideline) through a racial health equity lens.

The Ontario-based workshops will be held in five locations across Ontario. Click on the location to obtain more details about the event.

To learn about the on-demand webinars in this series, click here.

 

Using a racial equity lens in public health

Racism influences how opportunities for health and well-being are distributed. Given the existence of social and racial health inequities, it is imperative that public health adopt anti-racist approaches to understand and transform views, practices and policies at the root of racial discrimination.

The Guideline requires public health to apply anti-racist, anti-oppressive and culturally safe approaches to address health inequities. These workshops will present the pathways to racial health inequities, identify racism as a public health issue and identify strategies for developing a decolonial and anti-racist public health practice.

Participants will have a chance to dive deeper into the Guideline and develop skills around:

  • using race-related research in public health;
  • designing interventions to reduce racialized health inequities;
  • building partnerships for racial equity; and
  • developing policies to address racism.

Speakers

Sume Ndumbe-Eyoh,
Senior Knowledge Translation Specialist, NCCDH
Janet Dawson,
Knowledge Translation Specialist, NCCDH
Nana Yanful,
Knowledge Translation Specialist, NCCDH
Rebecca Cheff,
Researcher, Wellesley Institute


Related NCCDH resources

Let’s Talk: Racism and health equity (2017) Key public health resources for anti-racism action: A curated list (2018) Learning from Practice: Advocacy for health equity - Environmental racism (2017)

 

Workshop locations

London, Ontario

February 7, 2019
9:00 a.m.
4:00 p.m. (ET)

Location:
BMO Centre
295 Rectory Street
London, ON N5Z 2A7

This event will be jointly hosted by the National Collaborating Centre for Determinants of Health (NCCDH) and the Middlesex-London Health Unit (MLHU).

Click here to register.

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Ottawa, Ontario

March 5, 2019
 8:30 a.m.–4:00 p.m. (ET)

Location:
Nepean Sportsplex
1701 Woodroffe Avenue
Ottawa, ON K2G 0C4

This event will be jointly hosted by the National Collaborating Centre for Determinants of Health (NCCDH) and Ottawa Public Health (OPH).

Click here to register.

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Peterborough, Ontario

February 21, 2019
9:00 a.m.
4:00 p.m. (ET)

Location:
Peterborough Public Health
185 King Street
Peterborough, ON K9J 2R8

This event will be jointly hosted by the National Collaborating Centre for Determinants of Health (NCCDH) and Peterborough Public Health (PPH).

Click here to register.

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Sudbury, Ontario

March 1, 2019
9:00 a.m.
4:00 p.m. (ET)

Location:
Quality Inn & Conference Centre
390 Elgin Street South
Sudbury, Ontario, P3B 1B1

This event will be jointly hosted by the National Collaborating Centre for Determinants of Health (NCCDH) and Public Health Sudbury & Districts (PHSD).

Click here to register.

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Toronto, Ontario

March 26, 2019
9:00 a.m.
4:00 p.m. (ET)

Location:
YWCA Toronto
87 Elm Street
Toronto, ON M5G 0A8

This event will be jointly hosted by the National Collaborating Centre for Determinants of Health (NCCDH) and the Wellesley Institute.

Click here to register.

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  • Presenters:
  • Rebecca Cheff, 
  • Sume Ndumbe-Eyoh
    Sume Ndumbe-Eyoh

    Sume Ndumbe-Eyoh, MHSc

    Senior Knowledge Translation Specialist

    Sume has professional experiences in equity-focused organizational and community development and change, social justice education, HIV/AIDS prevention, research, knowledge translation, evaluation and women's rights with local, provincial and global organizations. Sume has previously contributed to teams at the Program Training and Consultation Centre of the Smoke Free Ontario Strategy, the Regional Diversity Roundtable, Ontario HIV Treatment Network, Southern African AIDS Trust and the Centre for Social Justice. Sume holds a Masters of Health Sciences in Health Promotion and Global Health from the University of Toronto.

    seyoh@stfx.ca

Webinars: PHESC On-Demand Webinar Series

This on-demand webinar series, offered through the 2018–2020 Public Health Training for Equitable Systems Change (PHESC) project, will help you better understand the requirements of the Ontario Public Health Standards through a health equity lens. 

Full series duration: Six ~30-minute modules (approximately 3.5 hours to complete in full)

Format: On-demand, meaning that these webinars are pre-recorded and can be viewed at any time. 

Location: Online

Cost: Free

Contact the NCCDH (nccdh@stfx.ca) for more information.

 


 

On-Demand Webinar 1: Introduction to Health Equity
 

What is health equity and why is it important? Definitions and examples

Click here to register (Webinar link will be sent via email.)

This on-demand webinar is now available in French.

Length: 38:03

The NCCDH will launch the first of its Public Health Training for Equitable Systems Change (PHESC) project offerings with this introductory on-demand webinar about health equity.

This on-demand webinar will describe key health equity concepts, including

  • health;
  • health equity and inequities;
  • social justice; and
  • social gradients in health.

It will explain why health equity is important to public health practice. The on-demand content will also encompass the concepts of intersectionality and how social determinants of health intersect.

PHESC on-demand webinar facilitators

Janet Dawson,
Knowledge Translation Specialist, NCCDH
Nana Yanful,
Knowledge Translation Specialist, NCCDH


Webinar 1: Pre-webinar readings

Let’s Talk: Health equity (2013) Glossary of essential health equity terms (2014)
Protecting and promoting the health of Ontarians: Ontario public health standards: Requirements for programs, services, and accountability (2018) Health equity guidelines, 2018 (2018)

 

 Webinar 1: Resources and discussion questions

The document below (PDF) containseflection questions, post-webinar readings and the list of pre-webinar readings outlined below. Click here to download.



Click here to register. (Webinar link will be sent via email.)

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On-Demand Webinar 2: Assessing and reporting on health inequities

 

Applying an equity-integrated framework

Click here to register. (Webinar link will be sent via email.)

This on-demand webinar is now available in French.

Length: 37:59

The NCCDH will launch this on-demand webinar on assessing and reporting on the needs of key populations.

In line with requirement #1 of the Health Equity Standard under the Ontario Public Health Standards, and guideline 6.1 of the Ontario Health Equity Guideline, 2018, this on-demand webinar will describe the importance of assessing for the existence and impact of health inequities and effective strategies to report these findings.

This content explores how to use an equity-integrated action framework for population health status reporting.

Listeners will learn about

  • indicators and approaches used to identify health inequities;
  • the importance of disaggregated data and intersectional analysis;
  • public health’s role to assess health inequities at a population level; and
  • how public health can report on health inequities in a way that leads to action.

PHESC on-demand webinar facilitators

Janet Dawson,
Knowledge Translation Specialist, NCCDH
Nana Yanful
Knowledge Translation Specialist, NCCDH


On-Demand Webinar 2: Pre-webinar readings

Let’s Talk: Public health roles for improving health equity (2013) Glossary of essential health equity terms (2014)
Protecting and promoting the health of Ontarians: Ontario public health standards: Requirements for programs, services, and accountability (2018) Health equity guidelines, 2018 (2018)


On-Demand Webinar 2: Resources and reflection questions

The document below (PDF) contains reflection questions, post-webinar readings and the list of pre-webinar readings outlined above. Click here to download.

 

Click here to register. (Webinar link will be sent via email.)

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On-Demand Webinar 3: Approaches to developing equitable public health interventions and strategies

Choosing equitable interventions and approaches

Click here to register. (Webinar link will be sent via email.)

Length: 29:33

The NCCDH will launch this on-demand webinar on modifying and orienting public health interventions and strategies.

In line with requirement #2 of the Health Equity Standard under the Ontario Public Health Standards, and guideline 6.2 of the Ontario Health Equity Guideline, 2018, this on-demand webinar will describe various approaches used to develop equitable public health interventions.

This content explores using an anti-oppressive practice framework for engaging in equitable interventions.

Listeners will learn about

  • why public health interventions need to be modified to create action on health inequities;
  • how different approaches can create inequities or can contribute to improving health equity; and
  • how language needs to promote compassion, empowerment, inclusiveness and equity.

PHESC on-demand webinar facilitators

Janet Dawson,
Knowledge Translation Specialist, NCCDH
Nana Yanful,
Knowledge Translation Specialist, NCCDH


On-Demand Webinar 3: Pre-webinar readings

Let’s Talk: Public health roles for improving health equity (2013) Let’s Talk: Universal and targeted approaches to health equity (2013) Glossary of essential health equity terms (2014)
 
Protecting and promoting the health of Ontarians: Ontario public health standards: Requirements for programs, services, and accountability (2018) Health equity guidelines, 2018 (2018)  

 

On-Demand Webinar 3: Resources and discussion questions

The document below (PDF) contains reflection questions, post-webinar readings and the list of pre-webinar readings outlined above. Click here to download.


Click here to register. (Webinar link will be sent via email.)

Back to top


 

On-Demand Webinar 4: Moving upstream: Working across sectors to decrease health inequities

 

Case studies: Intersectoral collaboration in public health

Click here to register. (Webinar link will be sent via email.)

Length: 28:02

The NCCDH will launch this on-demand webinar on multi-sectoral collaboration to decrease health inequities.

In line with requirement #3 of the Health Equity Standard under the Ontario Public Health Standards, and guideline 6.3 of the Ontario Health Equity Guideline, 2018, this on-demand webinar will describe the importance of upstream interventions and building effective and equitable partnerships with key health and non-health sector partners.

This content explores the meaning of transformative social change in the public health context, and engagement as a reflection of philosophy, goals and values.

Listeners will learn about

  • the importance of upstream interventions;
  • strategies for partnership to contribute to effective local strategies that decrease health inequities;
  • key health and non-health sector partners relevant to your public health work; and
  • upstream interventions that address the social determinants of health and work to influence decision-making and policy.

PHESC on-demand webinar facilitators

Janet Dawson,
Knowledge Translation Specialist, NCCDH
Nana Yanful
Knowledge Translation Specialist, NCCDH


On-Demand Webinar 4: Pre-webinar readings

Let’s Talk: Public health roles for improving health equity (2013) Let’s Talk: Advocacy and health equity (2013) Glossary of essential health equity terms (2014)
Let’s Talk: Moving upstream (2014) Protecting and promoting the health of Ontarians: Ontario public health standards: Requirements for programs, services, and accountability (2018) Health equity guidelines, 2018 (2018)

 

On-Demand Webinar 4: Resources and reflection questions

The document below (PDF) contains reflection questions, post-webinar readings and the list of pre-webinar readings outlined above. Click here to download.


Click here to register. (Webinar link will be sent via email.)

Back to top


 

On-Demand Webinar 5: Policy development and advocacy to improve health equity


Policy approaches to improve health inequity

Click here to register. (Webinar link will be sent via email.)

Length: 33:36

The NCCDH will launch this on-demand webinar on policy development and advocacy to decrease health inequities.

In line with requirement #4 of the Health Equity Standard under the Ontario Public Health Standards, and guideline 6.4 of the Ontario Health Equity Guideline, 2018, this on-demand webinar will explore policy development in the public health context, and the importance of advocacy as a public health role.

This content explores the meaning of systems change in the public health context, and the importance of language in addressing the social determinants of health and health inequities.

Listeners will learn about

  • public health’s role in leading and supporting policy development and advocacy;
  • downstream-, midstream- and upstream-level interventions;
  • the steps involved in healthy public policy development;
  • advocacy roles for public health professionals; and
  • choosing advocacy tools appropriate for effective public health practice.

PHESC on-demand webinar facilitators

Janet Dawson,
Knowledge Translation Specialist, NCCDH
Nana Yanful,
Knowledge Translation Specialist, NCCDH


On-Demand Webinar 5: Pre-webinar readings

Let’s Talk: Public health roles for improving health equity (2013) Let’s Talk: Advocacy and health equity (2015) Glossary of essential health equity terms (2014)
Let's Talk: Moving upstream (2014) Protecting and promoting the health of Ontarians: Ontario public health standards: Requirements for programs, services, and accountability (2018) Health equity guidelines, 2018 (2018)

 

On-Demand Webinar 5: Additional resources

The document below (PDF) contains self-reflection questions, post-webinar readings and the list of pre-webinar readings outlined above. Click here to download.


Click here to register. (Webinar link will be sent via email.)

Back to top


 

On-Demand Webinar 6: Racial Health Equity: Embracing a decolonial, anti-racist practice

 

Moving towards racial justice in public health practice

Click here to register. (Webinar will be sent via email.)

Length: 38:08

The NCCDH will launch this on-demand webinar on the importance of advancing racial health equity.

Recognizing the importance of using a racial equity lens in addressing all the requirements set out in the Health Equity Standard under the Ontario Public Health Standards, this on-demand webinar will describe the different forms and levels of racism, why racism is a public health issue and the public health roles for racial equity. 

This content explores the meaning of embracing a decolonial, anti-racist practice, and identifies the tools needed to begin on that journey. 

Listeners will learn about

  • institutional, systemic and individual racism and their impact on health; 
  • intersectionality, anti-oppression, allyship and systems change and how these relate to anti-racist action;
  • how racial equity fits with the Ontario Public Health Foundational Standards; and
  • public health’s role in leading racial equity work.

PHESC on-demand webinar facilitators

Janet Dawson,
Knowledge Translation Specialist, NCCDH
Nana Yanful,
Knowledge Translation Specialist, NCCDH


Pre-webinar readings

Let’s Talk: Public health roles for improving health equity (2013) Let’s Talk: Racism and health equity (2017) Glossary of essential health equity terms (2014)

 

On-Demand Webinar 6: Resources and discussion questions

The document below (PDF) contains self-reflection questions, post-webinar readings and the list of pre-webinar readings outlined above. Click here to download.

 

Click here to register. (Webinar will be sent via email.)

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  • Presenters:

Webinar: The anatomy of a health equity–oriented organization: Insights on organizational capacity

This webinar took place in English. Click here to access the recording (English only).

As part of the Organizational Capacity for Health Equity Action initiative the NCCDH is hosting a series of webinars to discuss ways to strengthen organizational capacity for health equity. The webinar series is based on evidence, learning circle discussions and experiences of the two public health organizations implementing organizational change projects. This is the first webinar in the series.

Public health organizations are increasingly acting on the everyday conditions that affect health in order to reduce systematic and unfair differences in health and social outcomes for population groups. As a result, organizational capacity for health equity — the ability to identify existing health inequities and act to reduce them — is a key area of investment. 

To meet these aims, organizations in pursuit of health equity are encouraged to build their organizational capacity to engage in deep and sustained action. Organizational and systems capacity consist of various domains, such as staff knowledge and skills, multisectoral and community partnerships and leadership and governance structures. 

The Organizational Capacity Initiative practice framework

Through the Organizational Capacity Initiative, we are developing and testing a broad framework that prioritizes influencing the social determinants of health equity action. This webinar discussed eight key areas of capacity for organizations seeking to improve health equity. These areas may have systemic, organizational and individual level components. Strengthening organizational capacity in these areas will enable organizations to more effectively enact health equity roles.

Participants will learn about

  • key elements of organizational capacity for health equity;
  • practical applications of these key elements to address health equity; and
  • systemic, organizational and individual aspects of organizational capacity for health equity.

Speakers

Sume Numbe-Eyoh, Senior Knowledge Translation Specialist, NCCDH
Bernie Pauly, Bernie Pauly, Associate Professor, University of Victoria,
and Principal Investigator, ELPH Research Program
Sana Shahram,
MSFHR Postdoctoral Fellow, Canadian Institute for Substance Use Research (CISUR)
 
Benita Cohen,
Associate Professor, University of Manitoba
Tania O'Connor,
Public Health Nurse,
Ottawa Public Health
 

 

Related resources

A conceptual framework of organizational capacity for public health equity action (OC-PHEA) (2013)

 

Click here to access the recording (English only).

  • Presenters:
  • Bernie Pauly, Sana Shahram, Benita Cohen, Tania O'Connor, 
  • Sume Ndumbe-Eyoh
    Sume Ndumbe-Eyoh

    Sume Ndumbe-Eyoh, MHSc

    Senior Knowledge Translation Specialist

    Sume has professional experiences in equity-focused organizational and community development and change, social justice education, HIV/AIDS prevention, research, knowledge translation, evaluation and women's rights with local, provincial and global organizations. Sume has previously contributed to teams at the Program Training and Consultation Centre of the Smoke Free Ontario Strategy, the Regional Diversity Roundtable, Ontario HIV Treatment Network, Southern African AIDS Trust and the Centre for Social Justice. Sume holds a Masters of Health Sciences in Health Promotion and Global Health from the University of Toronto.

    seyoh@stfx.ca

Webinar: Health and proximity to local resources

This webinar recording is available in both English and French


How the proximity to community resources impacts health 

This webinar discusses the relationship between population health and proximity to resources (parks, supermarkets, community centres, etc.) that impact our daily life. Drawing on solid scientific knowledge, speakers explain the correlation between the physical and mental health status of urban populations and housing conditions, food environment, community life and sustainable mobility.


Speakers

Sume Ndumbe-Eyoh, Senior Knowledge Translation Specialist, NCCDH Louise Potvin, Professor, Department of Social and Preventive Medicine, University of Montreal;
Director, Institut de recherche en santé publique
Ginette Boyer, Coordinator, Canada Research Chair in Community Approaches and Health Inequalities


Related resources

Quelles ressources constituent un environnement favorable à la santé?
Four English-language fact sheets (also available in French):

Local resources and health: 
Overview of knowledge
synthesis — Community life
(2018)
Local resources and health:
Overview of knowledge
synthesis — Food environment
(2018)
Local resources and health:
Overview of knowledge
synthesis — Housing
(2018)
Local resources and health:
Overview of knowledge
synthesis — Sustainable mobility
(2018)

 

Click here to access the English webinar recording.
Click here to access the French webinar recording.

  • Presenters:
  • Louise Potvin, Ginette Boyer, 
  • Sume Ndumbe-Eyoh
    Sume Ndumbe-Eyoh

    Sume Ndumbe-Eyoh, MHSc

    Senior Knowledge Translation Specialist

    Sume has professional experiences in equity-focused organizational and community development and change, social justice education, HIV/AIDS prevention, research, knowledge translation, evaluation and women's rights with local, provincial and global organizations. Sume has previously contributed to teams at the Program Training and Consultation Centre of the Smoke Free Ontario Strategy, the Regional Diversity Roundtable, Ontario HIV Treatment Network, Southern African AIDS Trust and the Centre for Social Justice. Sume holds a Masters of Health Sciences in Health Promotion and Global Health from the University of Toronto.

    seyoh@stfx.ca

Webinar: Communicating data for health equity action

This webinar took place in English. Click here to acces the recording (English only).

A Public Health and Preventive Medicine (PHPM) webinar hosted by the National Collaborating Centre for Determinants of Health

Population health status or community assessment reports represent data that has been collected, analyzed and presented to describe the health of a group, community or geographical area. Population health status reports (PHSR) can inform what practitioners and decision-makers need to know to allocate resources as well as plan programs and services.

Because of this purpose, communication is a critical component of how knowledge mobilization happens in equity-integrated population health status reporting. Communicating PHSR data effectively means making sure that audiences — including decision- and policy-makers — have current information presented in a way that makes it useable to influence programs and priorities. Data can be produced and communicated in ways that appeal to different audiences and bring attention to the underlying reasons that contribute to health inequities across the population.


Communicating health equity data

This English-language webinar focused on communicating health equity data to public health decision-makers who address population health inequities. Strategies for framing health equity data to highlight the root causes of inequities were presented, as well as approaches to knowledge translation and mobilization in the health status reporting of data relating to the social determinants of health.


Listeners will learn about

  • health equity indicators and how to integrate into health status reporting
  • practices for knowledge mobilization and communication of health equity data; and
  • ways to frame data to highlight the root causes of health inequities.

This webinar can support the fulfillment of Medical Officer of Health competencies, especially “monitoring and assessing the health of the public” and “communication, collaboration, and advocacy for the public’s health.”


Speakers

Dianne Oickle,
Knowledge Translation Specialist, National Collaborating Centre for Determinants of Health, NCCDH
Bruce Krentz,
Planning and Decision Support Analyst, Northern Health Authority (Thompson, MB)
Katrina Plamondon,
Regional Practice Leader, Research and Knowledge Translation, Interior Health Authority (Kelowna, BC)

 

Related resources

Equity-integrated population health status reporting: Action framework (2016) Communicating the social determinants of health: Income inequality and health (2014)
Communicating the social determinants of health common messaging guidelines (2013) Glossary of essential health equity terms (2014)


Click here to access the webinar (English only).

  • Presenters:
  • Katrina Plamondon, Bruce Krentz, 
  • Dianne Oickle
    Dianne Oickle

    Dianne Oickle, MSc, BSc

    Knowledge Translation Specialist

    Dianne is a dietitian with over 15 years’ experience working in public health in Ontario focused on reproductive and child health in a mostly rural setting with many diverse clients. Part of her work involved development of practice guidelines for health professionals, train-the-trainer initiatives, public presentations, educational resource development, working with the media, community coalition and network support, writing for the public and professionals, and program planning, implementation, and evaluation. She has taught university nutrition courses, worked with the provincial network supporting and advocating for dietitians in public health practice, and precepted over 20 dietetics and other students. Dianne earned her BSc in Nutrition and Consumer Studies (now Human Nutrition) at St. Francis Xavier University, and her MSc in Nutrition from the University of Saskatchewan.

    doickle@stfx.ca

Webinar: Measuring health inequalities: A toolkit

This webinar took place in English.

In partnership with the Canadian Institute for Health Information

In recent years, a growing number of health systems and health organizations have made the achievement of health equity — that is, the absence of unfair and avoidable differences in health and health care across the population — a priority in their practice. As more health systems work toward achieving health equity, relevant sociodemographic data and systematic measurement of health inequalities have become critical to monitoring progress towards reducing inequities. 

CIHI’s toolkit for measuring health inequities

In October 2018, the Canadian Institute for Health Information (CIHI) released a web-based toolkit to assist analysts and researchers with measuring and reporting on health inequalities in a consistent way. The toolkit is organized into three phases to help plan your analysis, analyze your data and report your findings. 

Drawing on the guidelines and resources in the toolkit, this webinar will outline how to measure health inequalities and report on indicators by subpopulations defined by equity stratifiers (i.e., sociodemographic variables) such as income and education. 

Participants will learn about

  • creating an analysis plan by considering commonly used equity stratifiers and standard definitions;
  • assessing the availability of equity stratifier data by using an inventory of selected CIHI and Statistics Canada data sources;
  • calculating stratified indicator rates and quantifying inequality using summary measures; and
  • using key guidelines for interpreting and reporting on health inequalities.

Speakers

Dianne Oickle,
Knowledge Translation Specialist, NCCDH
Dana Riley,
Program Lead, 
CIHI
Erin Pichora,
Program Lead,
CIHI


Related resources

 
Measuring health inequalities: A toolkit  

 

Click here to register.

  • Presenters:
  • Dana Riley, Erin Pichora, 
  • Dianne Oickle
    Dianne Oickle

    Dianne Oickle, MSc, BSc

    Knowledge Translation Specialist

    Dianne is a dietitian with over 15 years’ experience working in public health in Ontario focused on reproductive and child health in a mostly rural setting with many diverse clients. Part of her work involved development of practice guidelines for health professionals, train-the-trainer initiatives, public presentations, educational resource development, working with the media, community coalition and network support, writing for the public and professionals, and program planning, implementation, and evaluation. She has taught university nutrition courses, worked with the provincial network supporting and advocating for dietitians in public health practice, and precepted over 20 dietetics and other students. Dianne earned her BSc in Nutrition and Consumer Studies (now Human Nutrition) at St. Francis Xavier University, and her MSc in Nutrition from the University of Saskatchewan.

    doickle@stfx.ca

Webinar: Intersections of refugee women’s health

This webinar recording is available in English and French.

The National Collaborating Centre for Infectious Diseases (NCCID) continues its series of public health podcasts and webinars on refugee health. This time, NCCID, in partnership with National Collaboration Centre for Healthy Public Policy (NCCHPP) and National Collaborating Centre for Determinants of Health (NCCDH), offers an overview to public health physicians and policy makers in Canada on issues specific to refugee women.

This webinar encompasses the concept of intersectionality and how it is currently applied in public health through a gender lens. It elaborates on the ways policy influences men and women differently and potentially disadvantages women specifically. In addition, this webinar presents the challenges faced by refugee women in terms of access to care, mental health, trauma (psychiatric needs) and specific health experiences.    


Speaker

 
Dr. Bilkis Vissandjée,
Professor, Faculty of Nursing, University of Manitoba;
Researcher, Institute of Public Health Research, University of Montreal (IRSPUM)
 


Click here to access the recording in English.

Click here to access the recording in French.

Presentation: Positive mental health and well-being across the life course: Concepts and social determinants

This event will be jointly hosted by the National Collaborating Centre for Determinants of Health (NCCDH), St. Francis Xavier University’s Faculty of Education and Department of Psychology, the Mulroney Institute of Government and the Maple League of Universities.

This seminar will present the concept of positive mental health, describe the positive mental health status of Canadian youth and adults and demonstrate how positive mental health is related to social determinants of health. It will also discuss how — for youth — autonomy, competence and relatedness are associated with prosocial and negative behaviours, bullying, being bullied and school connectedness.

Location: Schwartz Auditorium, St. Francis Xavier University

 

Speaker

Dr. Heather Orpana is a Research Scientist in the Centre for Surveillance and Applied Research at the Public Health Agency of Canada, where she leads a team that conducts research to meet the evidence needs of the Health Promotion and Chronic Disease Prevention Branch. Dr. Orpana led the development of the Positive Mental Health Surveillance Indicator Framework, which presents data on positive mental health outcomes, risk and protective factors to help inform programs and policies.  She is passionate about knowledge exchange and ensuring that research evidence meets the needs of practitioners and decision makers to improve the health of Canadians. Dr. Orpana received her PhD in experimental psychology from the University of Ottawa and is an Adjunct Professor in the School of Epidemiology and Public Health at the University of Ottawa.

 

A live stream of this event will be available here.

A recording will be available on the NCCDH website after the event.

Webinar: Health-in-all policies as a health promotion strategy

This webinar took place in English. Click here to view the recording (English only).

The NCCDH and Health Promotion Canada (HPC) collaborated on a series of webinars to highlight several chapters of the book Health Promotion in Canada 4th edition: New Perspectives on Theory, Practice, Policy, and Research (2018). The goal was to explore how various themes in this book apply to public health action on health equity by pairing the authors’ content with practitioner perspective on application to public health practice.

The concept of health-in-all policies, or HiAP, is a relatively recent notion that builds on the concepts of multisectoral action, whole of government and healthy public policy. Increasingly becoming a health equity strategy for public health organizations and practitioners, HiAP recognizes the roots of health in economic and political policies, as well as acknowledging the multiple levels of government involved in decisions that have an impact on population health. With a focus on policy-making and implementation, HiAP incorporates health impact assessment as a tool to identify the influence of non-health sector actions on health outcomes, and identifies health as being influenced by individual, ecological and systemic factors.

This webinar explores the concept of HiAP and how it has come to be a health promotion strategy for public health action on health equity. We discuss opportunities and challenges for implementing HiAP, as well as the importance of evaluating impact on the social determinants of health. We also include practice examples relating to the implementation of HiAP, identifying the role for public health to advocate for this approach and participate in it actively.


Listeners will learn about

  • HiAP as an intersectoral strategy for action on health equity;
  • steps involved in the implementation of HiAP at various jurisdictional levels;
  • agenda-setting and capacity-building as challenges for HiAP; and
  • examples of HiAP implementation as a health promotion strategy for action on health equity.


Speakers

Dianne Oickle,
Knowledge Translation Specialist,
NCCDH
Ketan Shankardass,
Chair, Department of Health Sciences,
Wilfrid Laurier University
Victoria Barr,
Program Manager,
BC Healthy Communities


Related resources

Click here to access the recording (English only)

Webinar: Health in all policies as a health promotion strategy

Other related webinars in this series include:

  • Presenters:
  • Ketan Shankardass, Victoria Barr,, 
  • Dianne Oickle
    Dianne Oickle

    Dianne Oickle, MSc, BSc

    Knowledge Translation Specialist

    Dianne is a dietitian with over 15 years’ experience working in public health in Ontario focused on reproductive and child health in a mostly rural setting with many diverse clients. Part of her work involved development of practice guidelines for health professionals, train-the-trainer initiatives, public presentations, educational resource development, working with the media, community coalition and network support, writing for the public and professionals, and program planning, implementation, and evaluation. She has taught university nutrition courses, worked with the provincial network supporting and advocating for dietitians in public health practice, and precepted over 20 dietetics and other students. Dianne earned her BSc in Nutrition and Consumer Studies (now Human Nutrition) at St. Francis Xavier University, and her MSc in Nutrition from the University of Saskatchewan.

    doickle@stfx.ca

Webinar: Participatory practice and health promotion in Canada

This webinar took place in English. Click here to access the recording (English only).

The NCCDH and Health Promotion Canada (HPC) collaborated on a series of webinars to highlight several chapters of the book Health Promotion in Canada 4th edition: New Perspectives on Theory, Practice, Policy, and Research (2018). The goal was to explore how various themes in this book apply to public health action on health equity by pairing the authors’ content with practitioner perspective on application to public health practice.

Community engagement and participatory practice are core principles for health promotion strategies based on social justice. Individual and collective participation of all segments of society, with special attention to marginalized groups, can contribute to a transformative shift in public health practice to address health inequities. Authentic engagement brings different forms of knowledge forward, allowing practitioners to see people as a resource for the co-development of priorities and approaches instead of just an audience who receives a service.

This webinar explores participatory health promotion practice as an approach to action on health equity. Our presenters review the concept of engagement as a reflection of philosophy, goals and values. In addition, we discuss strategies for creating the space for practice to change, such as listening to stories, respectful dialogue and critical reflexivity. We also include a segment on the challenges of participatory practice and opportunities to overcome them through practice scenarios.

Listeners will learn about

  • theoretical and practical bases for participatory health promotion practice in Canada;
  • applying engagement strategies in public health practice to address health inequities; and
  • practice-based examples of participatory engagement to address factors contributing to health inequities.

Speakers

Dianne Oickle,
Knowledge Translation Specialist,
NCCDH
Jeff Masuda,
Associate Professor
School of Kinesiology and Health Studies, Queen’s University
Director, Centre for Environmental Health Equity
 
Jane Springett, Professor
School of Public Health, University of Alberta
 


Related resources

Review summary: Community engagement to reduce inequalities in health (2015) A guide to community engagement frameworks for action on the social determinants of health and health equity (2013) Public Health Speaks: Community engagement for health equity (2013)

 

Click here to access the recording (English only)

  • Presenters:
  • Jeff Masuda, Jane Springett, 
  • Dianne Oickle
    Dianne Oickle

    Dianne Oickle, MSc, BSc

    Knowledge Translation Specialist

    Dianne is a dietitian with over 15 years’ experience working in public health in Ontario focused on reproductive and child health in a mostly rural setting with many diverse clients. Part of her work involved development of practice guidelines for health professionals, train-the-trainer initiatives, public presentations, educational resource development, working with the media, community coalition and network support, writing for the public and professionals, and program planning, implementation, and evaluation. She has taught university nutrition courses, worked with the provincial network supporting and advocating for dietitians in public health practice, and precepted over 20 dietetics and other students. Dianne earned her BSc in Nutrition and Consumer Studies (now Human Nutrition) at St. Francis Xavier University, and her MSc in Nutrition from the University of Saskatchewan.

    doickle@stfx.ca

Webinar: The Healthy Built Environment Linkages Toolkit: How can community planning and design make us healthier?

This webinar took place in English. Click here to acces the recording (English only).

Human health is significantly influenced by the design of our communities. On a population health level, we are much more likely to achieve optimal health if our homes, transportation systems and public spaces are designed to help us interact with our neighbours, be close to nature, eat well and be physically active.

Partnering with local governments is a powerful public health strategy to encourage healthy living and prevent chronic disease. To support the integration of health priorities within community planning and design, the British Columbia Centre for Disease Control has released the Healthy Built Environment Linkages Toolkit (2018), an update of its 2014 publication of the same title. Since its original release in 2014, the HBE Linkages Toolkit has rapidly been adopted by health professionals and others who collaborate with local governments for credible health research and key messages.

Based on comprehensive literature reviews and weighted assessment criteria, the HBE Linkages Toolkit considers health evidence related to neighbourhood design, transportation systems, food systems, natural environments and housing. It also offers a synthesis of research findings, which link planning principles to specific health outcomes.

The full report and two-page summary can be found on the BCCDC website.

In this webinar, we reviewed new research content in the HBE Linkages Toolkit related to social well-being, economic co-benefits and small/medium-sized community contexts. We will also described potential ways to use this resource and next steps for its continued development. In addition, we drew on practice examples informed by the HBE Linkages Toolkit, such as the development of the Official Community Plan for the City of Abbotsford, which included health and well-being metrics to help evaluate the performance of different planning strategies.

Presenters

Teri Emrich,
Knowledge Translation Specialist, NCCDH
Charito Gailling,
Project Manager, Population and Public Health team, British Columbia Centre for Disease Control
Jennifer Fix,
Associate of Urban Planning and Design, DIALOG
Dr. Lisa Mu,
Public Health and Preventive Medicine physician

 

Related resource

 
Healthy Built Environment Linkages Toolkit: Making the Links Between Design, Planning and Health, Version 2.0 (2018)  

 

Click here to access the recording (English only).

  • Presenters:
  • Charito Gailling, Jennifer Fix, Dr. Lisa Mu, 

Webinar: Promising practices in Indigenous community health promotion

This webinar took place in English. Click here to access the recording (in English only).

The NCCDH and Health Promotion Canada (HPC) collaborated on a series of webinars to highlight several chapters of the newly released book Health Promotion in Canada 4th edition: New Perspectives on Theory, Practice, Policy, and Research. The goal was to explore how various themes in this book apply to public health action on health equity by pairing the authors’ content with practitioner perspective on application to public health practice. 

Self-determination is considered a determinant of health for Indigenous peoples and communities. Understanding the historical and sociopolitical contexts that influence Indigenous peoples’ health and wellness, including power structures and colonialism, is critical to effective public health strategies to address health equity. 

This webinar will explore what it means to be an ally at an organizational and systems level for Indigenous peoples and communities. The importance of Indigenous community engagement to the pursuit of health equity will be discussed, stressing the role that all practitioners have to play across geographies. Steps to engage with Indigenous communities in a meaningful way will be explored, including how to develop relationships where none previously existed. Examples of Indigenous community engagement strategies will also be highlighted.

Participants will learn about

  • the importance of culturally grounded and safe Indigenous public health strategies;
  • core elements to consider when developing health promotion in Indigenous communities; and
  • the value of Indigenous community-led health promotion to public health action on health equity.

Speakers

Dianne Oickle, 
Knowledge Translation Specialist, NCCDH
Dr. Charlotte Loppie,
Director, Centre for Indigenous Research and Community-Led Engagement, University of Victoria

Related resource

 
Health Promotion in Canada, Fourth Edition (2017)  

 

Click here to access the recording here (in English only).

  • Presenters:
  • Dr. Charlotte Loppie, 
  • Dianne Oickle
    Dianne Oickle

    Dianne Oickle, MSc, BSc

    Knowledge Translation Specialist

    Dianne is a dietitian with over 15 years’ experience working in public health in Ontario focused on reproductive and child health in a mostly rural setting with many diverse clients. Part of her work involved development of practice guidelines for health professionals, train-the-trainer initiatives, public presentations, educational resource development, working with the media, community coalition and network support, writing for the public and professionals, and program planning, implementation, and evaluation. She has taught university nutrition courses, worked with the provincial network supporting and advocating for dietitians in public health practice, and precepted over 20 dietetics and other students. Dianne earned her BSc in Nutrition and Consumer Studies (now Human Nutrition) at St. Francis Xavier University, and her MSc in Nutrition from the University of Saskatchewan.

    doickle@stfx.ca

Webinar: Contrasting entry points for intervention in health promotion practice

Contrasting entry points for intervention in health promotion practice

This webinar took place in English. Click here to access the recording(This webinar was also delivered in French on July 10, 2018, titled Différences dans les points d’entrée pour les interventions dans le domaine de la promotion de la santé.)

The NCCDH and Health Promotion Canada (HPC) collaborated on a series of webinars to highlight several chapters of the newly released book Health Promotion in Canada 4th edition: New Perspectives on Theory, Practice, Policy, and Research. The goal is to explore how various themes in this book apply to public health action on health equity by pairing the authors’ content with practitioner perspective on application to public health practice. 

Health promotion practice has traditionally consisted of three main entry points, which are issues/risk factors, population groups and settings. When planning interventions to address the social determinants of health (SDH) and health equity, the impact of the social context on the effectiveness of these three entry points is often dismissed, as is the importance of the social context itself. This occurs despite the fact that individuals and communities do not work in isolation from one another.

This webinar explored the three main entry points, as well as the impact of social context on health promotion interventions. The presenters shared practice-based examples that address this topic in relation to public health planning and policy development in the pursuit of health equity.

Listeners can learn about

  • the advantages and disadvantages to the points of intervention discussed;
  • the concept of ‘collective lifestyles’ as a mechanism of the social structure within which health is determined; and
  • the application of health promotion intervention points and social context to public health action for health equity.

Speakers

Dianne Oickle,
Knowledge Translation Specialist, NCCDH
Dr. Martine Shareck
Banting Postdoctoral Fellow, Dalla Lana School of Public Health, University of Toronto
Amanda Hudson-Frigault, 
Nova Scotia Take Home Naloxone Program Coordinator, Mental Health and Additions, Nova Scotia Hospital
Sabrina Turgeon,
Healthy Living Facilitator, Southern Health (Manitoba)


Related resources

 
Health Promotion in Canada, Fourth Edition (Chapter 6) (2017)  

 

Recording here (in English).

  • Presenters:
  • Dr. Martine Shareck, Amanda Hudson-Frigault, Sabrina Turgeon, 
  • Dianne Oickle
    Dianne Oickle

    Dianne Oickle, MSc, BSc

    Knowledge Translation Specialist

    Dianne is a dietitian with over 15 years’ experience working in public health in Ontario focused on reproductive and child health in a mostly rural setting with many diverse clients. Part of her work involved development of practice guidelines for health professionals, train-the-trainer initiatives, public presentations, educational resource development, working with the media, community coalition and network support, writing for the public and professionals, and program planning, implementation, and evaluation. She has taught university nutrition courses, worked with the provincial network supporting and advocating for dietitians in public health practice, and precepted over 20 dietetics and other students. Dianne earned her BSc in Nutrition and Consumer Studies (now Human Nutrition) at St. Francis Xavier University, and her MSc in Nutrition from the University of Saskatchewan.

    doickle@stfx.ca

Webinar: NCCDH environmental scan findings and their implications

This webinar took place in English. Click here to access the recording (in English only).

In this webinar, the NCCDH unpacked the results of its recent assessment of public health’s capacity to act on the social determinants of health and health equity in light of sector-wide restructuring. The document, titled Building a culture of equity in Canadian public health: An environmental scan, is the third report of this type produced by the NCCDH, following similar scans undertaken in 2014 and 2010. The discussion also included contributions from informants from the field, who commented on how the themes in the scan apply to their own practice.

Speaker

 
Connie Clement,
Scientific Director, NCCDH
 

 

Related resource

 
Building a culture of equity in Canadian public health: An environmental scan (2018)  


Recording here (English only)

  • Presenters:
  • Connie Clement
    Connie Clement

    Connie Clement, BSc

    Scientific Director Emeritus

    Connie Clement joined the NCCDH in January 2011. Before working with the NCCDH, she spent nearly three decades at Toronto Public Health as director of policy and planning when six public health units merged, and held varied management and front-line health promotion and sexual health positions. Connie was also the executive director of Health Nexus/Nexus Santé, an Ontario-oriented health promotion organization, and of Social Venture Partners Toronto, a venture philanthropy collaborative; she was also managing editor and collective member of Women Healthsharing. Connie holds a BSc in Biology/Sociology from Trent University. Connie received the Canadian Public Health Association’s certificate of merit in 2014.

    cclement@stfx.ca

Webinar: The health and social dimension of adult skills in Canada

This webinar took take place in English. Click here to access the recording (English only).

Canadians with higher levels of literacy, numeracy and problem solving skills generally report better health and stronger connections with their communities and society. This is a key finding from The Health and Social Dimensions of Adult Skills in Canada, a report released in February 2018 by the Public Health Agency of Canada and the Council of Ministers of Education, Canada

This webinar outlined key findings and implications from the report on relationships among adult skills, health and social well-being. This evidence can importantly inform research, policy and interventions across sectors to improve health and well-being through action on social determinants of health.

Speakers

Teri Emrich
Knowledge Translation Specialist, NCCDH
Andrea Long
Senior Policy Analyst, Public Health Agency of Canada
Yitian Tao
Analyst, Council of Ministers of Education, Canada
Karen Serwonka
Senior Policy Advisor, Health Equity and Prevention Unit, Population and Public Health Branch of Manitoba Health, Seniors and Active Living


Related Resources

 
The Health and Social Dimensions of Adult Skills in Canada (2018)  


Click here to access the recording (English only).

  • Presenters:

Webinar: Health equity in the field: Reflections for students and early career professionals

In partnership with the Ontario Public Health Association New Professionals Network

The goal of the webinar is to introduce public health students and early career professionals to health equity practice in the field. The webinar offers participants insight into everyday health equity practice through a focus on real life experiences of public health practitioners.

After the webinar participants will be able to

  1. describe everyday health equity practice in different organizational contexts;
  2. identify how to integrate health equity into their everyday public health practice even in roles which do not have an explicit equity/SDH mandate; and
  3. generate examples of how to demonstrate leadership as students and early career professionals.

Presenters

Sume Ndumbe-Eyoh
Senior Knowledge Translation Specialist, NCCDH
Connie Clement
Scientific Director, NCCDH
Shana Calixte
Manager, Mental Health and Addictions for Public Health, Sudbury and Districts
Christine Johnson
Health Equity Lead, Nova Scotia Health Authority
 
Lea Mutch
Indigenous Clinical Nurse Specialist and Program Specialist, Winnipeg Regional Health Authority Indigenous Health, Population and Public Health Program
 

 

Related resource

Key public health resources for Master of Public Health students: A curated list (2018)

 

Recording here (English only)

  • Presenters:
  • Christine Johnson, Shana Calixte, Lea Mutch, 
  • Sume Ndumbe-Eyoh
    Sume Ndumbe-Eyoh

    Sume Ndumbe-Eyoh, MHSc

    Senior Knowledge Translation Specialist

    Sume has professional experiences in equity-focused organizational and community development and change, social justice education, HIV/AIDS prevention, research, knowledge translation, evaluation and women's rights with local, provincial and global organizations. Sume has previously contributed to teams at the Program Training and Consultation Centre of the Smoke Free Ontario Strategy, the Regional Diversity Roundtable, Ontario HIV Treatment Network, Southern African AIDS Trust and the Centre for Social Justice. Sume holds a Masters of Health Sciences in Health Promotion and Global Health from the University of Toronto.

    seyoh@stfx.ca
  • Connie Clement
    Connie Clement

    Connie Clement, BSc

    Scientific Director Emeritus

    Connie Clement joined the NCCDH in January 2011. Before working with the NCCDH, she spent nearly three decades at Toronto Public Health as director of policy and planning when six public health units merged, and held varied management and front-line health promotion and sexual health positions. Connie was also the executive director of Health Nexus/Nexus Santé, an Ontario-oriented health promotion organization, and of Social Venture Partners Toronto, a venture philanthropy collaborative; she was also managing editor and collective member of Women Healthsharing. Connie holds a BSc in Biology/Sociology from Trent University. Connie received the Canadian Public Health Association’s certificate of merit in 2014.

    cclement@stfx.ca

Webinar: Examining early childhood indicators: Launch of a new data module and partnership tool

This webinar took place in English. Click here to access the recording.

The experiences, care and environments that children are exposed to between birth and age 5 will shape their health and well-being for years to come. Given how critical this period is for child development, all sectors of society have a role to play in creating the best possible environments for children to develop and grow.

In pursuit of this aim, the Canadian Council on Social Determinants of Health, the Canadian Institute of Child Health and the Public Health Agency of Canada have developed user-friendly, online resources to support planning related to early child health inequalities. The resources present approximately 400 indicators across eight sections relating to social determinants of health and feature a series of practice-based examples of intersectoral initiatives. An online partnership tool has also been created to provide users with recommendations for how to address the issues that users identify as important.

This webinar provides an overview of these new tools and how data from different sectors has been used to lead action on early childhood development. Practice-based examples of how data can be used for advocacy and policy development are shared. An overview of the partnership tool to identify intersectoral stakeholders for collaborative planning of interventions to address early childhood development inequalities is also presented. These resources are helpful to anyone working with children, looking to build partnerships, or designing interventions to improve the health and well-being of young children.


Listeners will learn about

  • using indicators for the planning and implementation of programs to address health inequalities
  • linking early child development indicators to those related to social determinants of health, including housing, food insecurity, violence and mental health; and
  • identifying and engaging intersectoral partners for data-based collaborative planning of interventions on early childhood development.


Speakers

Dianne Oickle, Knowledge Translation Specialist, NCCDH
Louise Hanvey, Research Director, Canadian Institute of Child Health Profile Project
Shelley Callaghan, Project Manager/Consultant, Canadian Institute of Child Health Christine Soon, Senior Policy Analyst, Social Determinants of Health Division, Centre for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Equity, Public Health Agency of Canada

 

Related resources

Pan-Canadian Health Inequalities data tool, 2017 edition (2017) The health of Canada’s children and youth: A CICH profile (2018)

 

Click here to access the recording (English only).

Webinar: Examining early childhood indicators: Launch of a new data module and partnership tool

  • Presenters:
  • Louise Hanvey, Shelley Callaghan, Christine Soon, 
  • Dianne Oickle
    Dianne Oickle

    Dianne Oickle, MSc, BSc

    Knowledge Translation Specialist

    Dianne is a dietitian with over 15 years’ experience working in public health in Ontario focused on reproductive and child health in a mostly rural setting with many diverse clients. Part of her work involved development of practice guidelines for health professionals, train-the-trainer initiatives, public presentations, educational resource development, working with the media, community coalition and network support, writing for the public and professionals, and program planning, implementation, and evaluation. She has taught university nutrition courses, worked with the provincial network supporting and advocating for dietitians in public health practice, and precepted over 20 dietetics and other students. Dianne earned her BSc in Nutrition and Consumer Studies (now Human Nutrition) at St. Francis Xavier University, and her MSc in Nutrition from the University of Saskatchewan.

    doickle@stfx.ca

Webinar: Developing public health leadership for health equity action

Presented collaboratively by the National Collaborating Centre for Determinants of Health (NCCDH) and the National Collaborating Centre for Methods and Tools (NCCMT)

Attention to health equity within the public health sector has increased in recent years due to a growing evidence base, greater commitment to action by leadership, the incorporation of health equity into strategic plans and priorities, the creation of positions dedicated to health equity, and the development of both guidance documents and organizational capacity.

Public health leadership to advance health equity occurs at community, organizational and societal levels. Leadership is influenced by values and is grounded in relationships, helping to shape the internal and external environments in which public health functions. However, public health practitioners in formal and informal leadership positions do not always receive adequate leadership training, regardless of their educational background.

This webinar considers strategies to develop and support public health leadership to advance health equity. The discussion revolved around the results of a 2016 scoping review of literature on public health leadership for action on health equity (Betker, 2016). Drawing on Betker’s work, the event highlighted key attributes of leadership, such as being oriented to values of social justice and solidarity, and will also address how to align leadership attributes with public health roles for health equity.

Participants will learn about

  • key attributes of public health leadership for action on health equity;
  • importance of values and relationships to leadership for public health action on health equity; and
  • tools, strategies and mechanisms to support public health leadership development for action on health equity.

Speakers

Dianne Oickle, Knowledge Translation Specialist, NCCDH Dr. Claire Betker, Executive Director, Active Living, Population and Public Health, Manitoba Health, Seniors and Active Living Dr. Donna Ciliska, Senior Knowledge Translation Advisor, National Collaborating Centre for Methods and Tools

Resources

What contributes to successful public health leadership for health equity? An appreciative inquiry (2013) Public Health Speaks: Public health leadership for health equity (2015)
Public Health Speaks: Leadership for health equity [video] (2013) Leadership for health equity: Working intersectorally and engaging the community in Western Health (2014)
 
Public health leadership to advance health equity: A scoping review and metasummary (2016)  

 

  • Presenters:
  • Donna Ciliska, Claire Betker, 
  • Dianne Oickle
    Dianne Oickle

    Dianne Oickle, MSc, BSc

    Knowledge Translation Specialist

    Dianne is a dietitian with over 15 years’ experience working in public health in Ontario focused on reproductive and child health in a mostly rural setting with many diverse clients. Part of her work involved development of practice guidelines for health professionals, train-the-trainer initiatives, public presentations, educational resource development, working with the media, community coalition and network support, writing for the public and professionals, and program planning, implementation, and evaluation. She has taught university nutrition courses, worked with the provincial network supporting and advocating for dietitians in public health practice, and precepted over 20 dietetics and other students. Dianne earned her BSc in Nutrition and Consumer Studies (now Human Nutrition) at St. Francis Xavier University, and her MSc in Nutrition from the University of Saskatchewan.

    doickle@stfx.ca

Webinar: Selecting and assessing health equity tools

A health equity tool is a document or resource that identifies equity as a goal and can assess, measure or promote the inclusion of health equity considerations in policies or programs. Public health practitioners look to health equity tools to help identify actions that will address the socioenvironmental influences on health. As the number and availability of health equity–related tools are increasing, the careful selection and implementation of the right tool for the intended purpose has become increasingly important.

Focus

This webinar focuses on the availability of health equity tools for use by public health practitioners to address population health inequities. We learned about the Equity Lens in Public Health’s (ELPH) updated inventory of health equity tools, which identifies nine categories of health equity tools developed for a range of purposes and audiences.

Guest presenters explored five main considerations for selecting a health equity tool, including four key organizational conditions required for successful implementation. We also heard about practical and theoretical criteria to consider when determining if a particular health equity tool is suitable, which support public health practitioners to further their understanding of how to address population health inequities.

Speakers

Dianne Oickle, Knowledge Translation Specialist, NCCDH
Bernie Pauly, Associate Professor, University of Victoria,
and Principal Investigator, ELPH Research Program
Sana Shahram, MSFHR Health Policy Fellow,
Centre for Addictions Research of British Columbia

 

Resources

Health Equity Tools s 2.0 (2016) Blog post: Do tools catalyze action on health equity? (2017)

 

Recording here (English only)

  • Presenters:
  • Bernie Pauly, Sana Shahram, 
  • Dianne Oickle
    Dianne Oickle

    Dianne Oickle, MSc, BSc

    Knowledge Translation Specialist

    Dianne is a dietitian with over 15 years’ experience working in public health in Ontario focused on reproductive and child health in a mostly rural setting with many diverse clients. Part of her work involved development of practice guidelines for health professionals, train-the-trainer initiatives, public presentations, educational resource development, working with the media, community coalition and network support, writing for the public and professionals, and program planning, implementation, and evaluation. She has taught university nutrition courses, worked with the provincial network supporting and advocating for dietitians in public health practice, and precepted over 20 dietetics and other students. Dianne earned her BSc in Nutrition and Consumer Studies (now Human Nutrition) at St. Francis Xavier University, and her MSc in Nutrition from the University of Saskatchewan.

    doickle@stfx.ca

Webinar: Public health ethics and equity

The NCCDH and the National Collaborting Centre for Healthy Public Policy (NCCHPP) co-presented a webinar entitled "Public Health Ethics and Equity: Naming and Navigating Ethical Issues in Public Health Practice."

In this webinar, presenter Dr. Bernie Pauly shared insights drawn from the the Equity Lens in Public Health (ELPH) research project into some of the ethical issues practitioners face in addressing health inequities in public health practice, as well as some means for navigating these issues within health organizations.

Speaker

Dr. Bernie Pauly
Principal Investigator with the Equity Lens in Public Health (ELPH) 5-year CIHR funded research project and Associate Professor with the Centre for Addictions Research of BC and School of Nursing at the University of Victoria.

 

Recording here (English).

  • Presenters:
  • Sume Ndumbe-Eyoh
    Sume Ndumbe-Eyoh

    Sume Ndumbe-Eyoh, MHSc

    Senior Knowledge Translation Specialist

    Sume has professional experiences in equity-focused organizational and community development and change, social justice education, HIV/AIDS prevention, research, knowledge translation, evaluation and women's rights with local, provincial and global organizations. Sume has previously contributed to teams at the Program Training and Consultation Centre of the Smoke Free Ontario Strategy, the Regional Diversity Roundtable, Ontario HIV Treatment Network, Southern African AIDS Trust and the Centre for Social Justice. Sume holds a Masters of Health Sciences in Health Promotion and Global Health from the University of Toronto.

    seyoh@stfx.ca

Webinar: “Racing” the social determinants of health and health equity (Part 2 of 2)

This webinar is the second of a two-part series on the impact of racism on health and approaches to addressing racism and improving the health of Indigenous and racialized peoples. Racism, defined as a systemic force that impacts the distribution of power and resources based on socially defined “races,” impacts the health and well-being of Indigenous and racialized peoples.

The webinar will explore approaches to addressing racism that occurs at the organizational and systemic levels. Specifically, the webinar will:

  • share examples of anti-racist organizational transformation;
  • discuss anti-racist policy approaches; and
  • highlight the importance measuring systemic racism in public health data systems.


Speakers

    
Sume Ndumbe-Eyoh, MHSc, Senior Knowledge Translation Specialist, NCCDH Dr. Onye Nnorom, Associate Program Director, Public Health and Preventive Medicine Residency Program, Dalla Lana School of Public Health, University of Toronto, and TAIBU Health Centre                                                                                                                                                                        


Related resource

Let's talk: Racism and health equity (2017)


Recording here (English only)

Missed Part 1 of the series? Access the recording and summary here.

  • Presenters:
  • Sume Ndumbe-Eyoh
    Sume Ndumbe-Eyoh

    Sume Ndumbe-Eyoh, MHSc

    Senior Knowledge Translation Specialist

    Sume has professional experiences in equity-focused organizational and community development and change, social justice education, HIV/AIDS prevention, research, knowledge translation, evaluation and women's rights with local, provincial and global organizations. Sume has previously contributed to teams at the Program Training and Consultation Centre of the Smoke Free Ontario Strategy, the Regional Diversity Roundtable, Ontario HIV Treatment Network, Southern African AIDS Trust and the Centre for Social Justice. Sume holds a Masters of Health Sciences in Health Promotion and Global Health from the University of Toronto.

    seyoh@stfx.ca

Resources in our Library:

Webinar: Building for mental health: Healthy built environments for children and youth

This webinar will focus on factors in the urban built and social environments that promote child and youth mental health, as well as how public health can work to support these factors through upstream approaches. The built environment refers to structures, spaces and products created or modified by people. Elements such as housing, transportation, buildings and urban green space (e.g., parks, gardens, playing fields) and blue space (e.g., waterfronts) intersect with the natural and social environments to impact mental health. Children and youth are particularly vulnerable to physical and social factors that promote or impede the development of positive mental health.

Content will include research that explores:

  • how positive mental health in children and youth is impacted by characteristics of built and social environments;
  • the intersection between built and social environments and how they impact child and youth mental health;
  • equity-related influences within built and social environments on child and youth mental health; and
  • the role of public health in promoting population mental health through built environment initiatives.

The goals of this webinar are:

  • to offer evidence and define roles for public health practitioners that will inform policy actions to address inequities; and
  • to create healthy built environments that promote child and youth mental health.

This webinar can support efforts to meet Medical Officer of Health competencies, especially “communication, collaboration and advocacy for the public’s health.”

Our speakers:

 
  Emily Rugel, Ph.D. candidate, University of British Columbia School of Population and Public Health
Dianne Oickle, Knowledge Translation Specialist, NCCDH
 

Acknowledgement:

Resources:

 

Click here to register.

  • Presenters:
  • Emily Rugel, 
  • Dianne Oickle
    Dianne Oickle

    Dianne Oickle, MSc, BSc

    Knowledge Translation Specialist

    Dianne is a dietitian with over 15 years’ experience working in public health in Ontario focused on reproductive and child health in a mostly rural setting with many diverse clients. Part of her work involved development of practice guidelines for health professionals, train-the-trainer initiatives, public presentations, educational resource development, working with the media, community coalition and network support, writing for the public and professionals, and program planning, implementation, and evaluation. She has taught university nutrition courses, worked with the provincial network supporting and advocating for dietitians in public health practice, and precepted over 20 dietetics and other students. Dianne earned her BSc in Nutrition and Consumer Studies (now Human Nutrition) at St. Francis Xavier University, and her MSc in Nutrition from the University of Saskatchewan.

    doickle@stfx.ca

Resources in our Library:

Webinar: “Racing” the social determinants of health and health equity (Part 1 of 2)

This webinar is the first of a two-part series on the impact of racism on health. The aim of the discussions is to explore approaches to addressing racism, as well as how to improve the health of Indigenous and racialized peoples.

In this first webinar, our speakers will focus on the following topics:

  • Introducing racism as a determinant of health and well-being
  • Describing core concepts related to systemic racism
  • Highlighting the impact of racism on health

Our speakers:

Resource:

Let’s talk: Racism and health equity

 

Recording here (English only).

  • Presenters:
  • Dr. Ingrid Waldron, 
  • Sume Ndumbe-Eyoh
    Sume Ndumbe-Eyoh

    Sume Ndumbe-Eyoh, MHSc

    Senior Knowledge Translation Specialist

    Sume has professional experiences in equity-focused organizational and community development and change, social justice education, HIV/AIDS prevention, research, knowledge translation, evaluation and women's rights with local, provincial and global organizations. Sume has previously contributed to teams at the Program Training and Consultation Centre of the Smoke Free Ontario Strategy, the Regional Diversity Roundtable, Ontario HIV Treatment Network, Southern African AIDS Trust and the Centre for Social Justice. Sume holds a Masters of Health Sciences in Health Promotion and Global Health from the University of Toronto.

    seyoh@stfx.ca

Resources in our Library:

Webinar: Collective impact, health equity and public health

Join us for a discussion of how participating in a collective impact initiative can deepen public health’s commitment to community engagement and health equity.

This webinar will be of interest to anyone looking to learn more about working with community to make change; however, we recommend you read Collective Impact 3.0 from the Tamarack Institute before attending, or watch the video below in which Liz Weaver and Mark Cabaj of Tamarack share their insights about the evolution of collective impact and what it will take to get to transformative community change.

Link to vdeo:

We also welcome you to review the recent NCCDH publication on this topic, which covers stories of the Vancouver Island Child and Youth Health Network and London, Ontario’s Child & Youth Health Network

Our speakers:


 
Petra Chambers-Sinclair, collective impact consultant and former coordinator of the Child and Youth Health Network of Vancouver Island Louis Sorin, Chair of the NCCDH Advisory Board and CEO of End Homelessness Winnipeg Hannah Moffatt, Population Health Equity Initiatives Leader,
Winnipeg Regional Health Authority


Click here
to register.

Resources in our Library:

FREE Online Training Course on Analyzing Public Policies being offered by NCCHPP

Click here to read more and to register for this course from the NCC for Healthy Public Policy.

Innovative approaches to promoting population mental health and wellbeing

St. Francis Xavier University is pleased to present Professor Margaret Barry, PhD, from the National University of Ireland Galway. 

Professor Barry’s talk, Innovative approaches to promoting population mental health and wellbeing: Who needs to be engaged for effective action?, is co-presented by the National Collaborating Centre for Determinants of Health, the St. Francis Xavier Department of Education and office of the Associate Vice President of Research. 

This presentation addresses the need for innovative policies and approaches in addressing the social determinants of mental health and considers what it means in practice to adopt a whole-of-government and a whole-of-society approach to promoting population mental health and wellbeing. This event has been made possible by a Dobbin Atlantic Scholarship from the Ireland Canada University Foundation, provided with support from the Irish Government.

Details:

  • Thursday June 1, 2017 at 2:30 – 3:30 pm AST        
  • A Maple League of Universities eventLocation  at St. FX - Coady Institute Room 242
  • Interactive audio & video through Cisco technology for Maple League schools - Livestream event to be recorded https://livestream.com/accounts/735962/events/7374838

 

Webinar: Methods and tools for integrating health equity into public health program planning and implementation

Presented by the NCCDH and the National Collaborating Centre for Methods and Tools (NCCMT).

This event will be presented in English. An audio recording will be available following the event. The presentation slides will be posted online in English and French following the event. French slides are available in advance of this event upon request; please email nccmt@mcmaster.ca.

Apply a health equity lens to evidence-informed public health

Join us for a discussion of methods and tools that can be used to support evidence-informed decision making in the context of health equity. Learn about resources to help you apply health equity principles to planning processes that contribute to evidence informed public health.

Hear examples from public health practitioners

We are pleased to host guest speakers from Niagara Region Public Health for a discussion on the use of the 10 promising practices to address health equity. This will include the results of a qualitative study to identify barriers and facilitators, and will provide recommendations for strengthening planning and implementation practice to improve health equity.

To register, click here.

Webinar series: Health equity tools for public health organizations and practitioners

As the number, variety, and scope of tools increases, practitioners may find it challenging to know which tools to use, how and when to use them, and what factors to consider in their application. Over the course of three webinars, we will explore the use and impact of health equity tools in public health practice. Each webinar in this series will feature guest advisors who will describe a tool, give examples how it is used, and discuss the impact on practice. 

WEBINAR SCHEDULE
(Please note: specific dates, topics, and guests will be revised closer to the date of each webinar. Stayed tuned to the events page or contact us for more information)

Friday, March 17, 2017

Design and modus operandi of a tool based on a reflexive approach (Reflex-ISS) to encourage the integration of equity into public health practices

Who should attend?

This webinar series is intended for public health stakeholders at all organizational levels and disciplines who are interested in health equity issues. People are encouraged to attend in groups and to invite community partners to stimulate conversation at the local level.

REGISTRATION

To register, click the link to an individual webinar.

Recommended reading:

ADDITIONAL NCCDH WORK RELATED TO TOOLS

We want to hear from you!
Do you have suggestions for topics that are central to your work? We’re always looking for new ideas and suggested presenters, so please be in touch! 

For more information, contact Dianne Oickle, Knowledge Translation Specialist.
 

NCCDH at World Health Summit Regional Meeting 2017

Are you attending the World Health Summit Regional Meeting - North America 2017 in Montreal, May 8-9? If so, join us for this NCCDH presentation:

May 8

3 – 4:30 p.m. EDT (Panel Discussion)

The Legacy of Ottawa Charter: Integrating Research and Public Health Practice (Room 3)

Chairs:

  • Prof. Dr. Ilona Kickbusch, Director, Global Health Centre & Associate Professor, The Graduate Institute of International and Development Studies, Switzerland
  • Prof. Dr. Louise Potvin, Professor at the Department of Social and Preventive Medicine, School of Public Health, Université de Montreal, Canada
  • Ph.D Lucie Richard, Director of the Institut de recherche en santé publique de l’Université de Montréal (IRSPUM), Canada

Speakers:

  • Prof. Dr. Clare Bambra, Director of the Centre for Health and Inequalities Research, Newcastle University, United Kingdom
  • Connie Clement, Scientific Director at the National Collaborating Centre for Determinants of Health, Canada
  • Prof. Dr. Sarah Fraser, Clinical psychologist and professor at the school of Psychoeducation at Université de Montréal, Canada

For more information and to register, visit the World Health Summit website.

Webinar: Taking action on the root cause: Inadequate income and food insecurity

Food insecurity has physical, social, and mental health consequences. The level of household food insecurity is not only an indicator of how well adults and children are doing economically, it is also a social determinant of health equity. As the root cause of food insecurity is poverty, it would seem that the solutions would be income-focused. Yet public health practice is often focused on food skills and charity program models, which provide food access and support but do not address the material deprivation that creates food insecurity.

This webinar will focus on inadequate income as the root cause of food insecurity, and actions public health professionals can take to shift practice beyond food-focused initiatives and towards income-based policy solutions. We will hear about the role of public health in social justice issues, and what public health programs that address the root causes of food insecurity can look like. We will learn about the role public health can play in calculating a basic income rate and advocating for income-based policy change. We will also hear about examples of public health working in partnership with community organizations to identify and address risk factors for food insecurity in vulnerable neighborhoods. Guest experts will explore practical considerations for public health practice across professional disciplines, as well as “take home actions” for participants to consider in their daily practice. 

Presenters:

  • Tracy Woloshyn, Public Health Dietitian, York Region Public Health Services (Ontario)
  • Christine Johnson, Health Equity Lead, Nova Scotia Health Authority
  • Meghan Martin, Community Health Specialist, Fraser Health Authority (British Columbia)

Facilitator: Dianne Oickle, Knowledge Translation Specialist, NCCDH

Resources:

Click here to register.

For more information on this webinar, please contact Dianne Oickle, Knowledge Translation Specialist, NCCDH.

Public health equity leadership and capacity: Do tools catalyze action?

Public health equity leadership and capacity: Do tools catalyze action?

Pre-session to the annual Canadian Public Health Association (CPHA) conference.

Monday June 5, 2017. World Trade & Convention Centre, Halifax NS.

Presented by the NCCDH, ELPH (Equity Lens in Public Health), the National Collaborating Centre for Methods and Tools (NCCMT), and the Nova Scotia Health Authority.

Just as knowledge doesn’t equal behaviour and action, the existence of tools doesn’t address health equity. The use of tools can be a catalyst for conversation on shifting practice to address health equity as well as a strategy through which to take action on the social determinants of health, yet precursors must be in place to support effective application of tools. Addressing health equity through public health interventions requires leadership and organizational capacity to support meaningful action through program planning and implementation. 

This workshop will discuss factors that impact taking action on health equity, how organizational capacity impacts the effective integration of health equity approaches, and the role of leadership to support action. This session is intended as a workshop for frontline practitioners as well as formal leaders and decision makers. This session will focus on advancing concepts and application of health equity in health care systems and assumes that participants will have knowledge of basic health equity and social determinants of health concepts.

The learning objectives for this session are to:

  • Deepen understanding of how organizational capacity and change processes influence the integration of health equity in public health
  • Explore organizational factors and public health system characteristics on the use of tools to address  health equity
  • Identify opportunities at an organizational and leadership level to shift public health practice to address health equity
  • Critically reflect on how public health practice can influence the structural processes that create inequities

The full day event will include presentations and interactive sessions on assessing organizational capacity and readiness for change, public health context for meaningful use of tools, and leadership to address health equity.

Who should attend:

This session is intended as a workshop for frontline practitioners as well as formal leaders and decision makers. The session will not introduce basic equity and determinants concepts; participants should have moderate (or advanced) knowledge of health equity and public health systems.

It is however open to all public health practitioners in working on the social determinants of health and health equity. You do not have to be attending the main conference of the (CPHA) to register for this pre-conference session.

Speakers:

Coming soon!

Planning team:

  • Dianne Oickle, Knowledge Translation Specialist, NCCDH
  • Bernie Pauly, Professor at University of Victoria and Principal Investigator - Equity Lens in Public Health (ELPH)
  • Christine Johnson, Health Equity Lead Public Health - Nova Scotia Health Authority (NSHA)
  • Kristin Read, Research Coordinator, and Shelley Russel, MPH student - National Collaborating Centre for Methods and Tools (NCCMT)
  • Sana Shahram - Michael Smith Foundations for Health Research Postdoctoral Fellow, Centre for Addictions Research of British Columbia & NCCDH Board Member 

Registration: Participant $40, student $25 (lunch & snacks included; breakfast not provided).
Registration closes on May 26th at 6 pm EST. Click here to register. If you have any questions, please contact Dianne Oickle at doickle@stfx.ca.

Request for Proposals: Environmental scan in the area of the determinants of health for public health

In brief 

The National Collaborating Centre for Determinants of Health (NCCDH) is seeking a consultant undertake an environmental scan, in collaboration with NCCDH staff and an expert advisory group. This scan will help guide the future work of the NCCDH, and also be written for use by the public health sector to guide public health planning. This work will include examples of public health and knowledge mobilization actions/interventions that work, as well as those deemed to be promising, in the context of current public health programs, policies and structures in Canada. The environmental scan will include, but is not limited to, the components listed below: 

  • Identification and review of key documents and literature (English and French);
  • Identification of and key informant interviews with public health leaders/stakeholders (a portion in French);
  • Analysis of promising areas for the NCCDH to enhance and support the work of public health practitioners, policy-makers and decision-makers across Canada in advancing health equity/social determinants of health; and,
  • Refinement of NCCDH primary and secondary audiences.

Resulting in a report, and executive summary, with sufficient information to guide the NCCDH in shaping the future direction of its activities; and an information package to facilitate the validation of the environmental scan.

Background: National Collaborating Centre for Public Health Program

Established in 2005 and funded through the Public Health Agency of Canada, the six National Collaborating Centres (NCCs) for Public Health work together to promote the use of scientific research and other knowledge to strengthen public health practices, programs and policies in Canada. A unique knowledge hub, the NCCs identify knowledge gaps, foster networks and provide the public health system with an array of evidence-based resources, multi-media products, and knowledge translation services. The NCCs are located across Canada, and each focuses on a different public health priority.

The six centres are:

  • NCC for Aboriginal Health at the University of Northern British Columbia, in Prince George
  • NCC for Determinants of Health at St. Francis Xavier University, in Antigonish, Nova Scotia
  • NCC for Healthy Public Policy at L'Institut national de santé publique du Québec, in Montreal
  • NCC for Environmental Health at the BC Centre for Disease Control, in Vancouver
  • NCC for Infectious Diseases at the University of Manitoba, in Winnipeg
  • NCC for Methods and Tools at McMaster University, in Hamilton, Ontario

Background: National Collaborating Centre for Determinants of Health

The NCCDH’s goal is that public health organizations and practitioners are enabled to effectively utilize available resources to advance social determinants of health and health equity, as a result of knowledge mobilization (KM) activities that are focused on actions/interventions that work.

The NCCDH does not perform research studies. Instead, we gather the evidence and information distributed by researchers and make it accessible to stakeholders such as public and population health practitioners, researchers, policy-makers and professional associations across Canada.  Our end goal is improved overall population health, and a smaller gap between the healthiest and least healthy, in Canada.

Our objectives are to:

  1.  Build public health practitioner knowledge, skill and leadership capacity, with a focus on modifying common public health practices and essential organizational roles/functions (at system, organization and front-line levels) to effectively mitigate and improve social determinants of health (SDH) and advance health equity (HE).
  2. Strengthen public health sector networks (community-of-practice) to support peer-to-peer and collaborative action to address SDH and advance HE.
  3. Encourage researchers to pursue theoretical and practice-based research that effectively integrates SDH and HE issues based on identified evidence gaps and promising and proven practices.

Environmental Scan of health equity/determinants of health methods and approaches in Public Health

The Consultant will work with an advisory committee to refine the following research questions that will help to guide the scan:

1. What is the current state of public health action in Canada to improve SDH and HE?

a. What are the current actions/interventions (practice and organization-based) being undertaken by public health?
b. What actions/interventions appear to be effective or showing promise?
c. What are the key challenges, needs and gaps?

2. Where are the opportunitites for public health action to improve SDH and HE?

a. Where are the key opportunities in relation to the 3 priority areas of the Common agenda for public health action on health equity (Build a foundation for action; Establish and use a strong knowledge base; Collaborate with non-health sector partners)
b. Who is well positioned to provide leadership among the various stakeholders to take advantage of the opportunities?

3. Where can NCCDH work most effectively to mobilize knowledge in relation to our three objectives (build knowledge, skill and leadership; strengthen networks; encourage research)?

a. What is the current niche for the NCCDH?  Who are the primary and secondary audiences (formal public health system, public health influencers and stakeholders) within this niche?
b. Where are the opportunities to refine our niche and audiences? What factors would help NCCDH stand out from our partners and competitors?
c. What KM tools would be most effective to reach and support our target audiences, including: virtual platforms, convening role/technology, and partnership improvement?

The deliverables for the environmental scan are outlined below:

  1. Environmental scan report.
  2. Executive summary report (standalone) of the environmental scan.
  3. Information package to facilitate the validation of the environmental scan, e.g. method description; sub-report of document and literature search, analysis and findings; sub-report of key informant interview guide and key informant interviews; detailing of resources newly identified; citation of references.

Proposal:

We require a detailed proposal with a cost estimate and projected timelines for the environmental scan that includes the above deliverables. The environmental scan will start no later than April and must be completed (final report submitted and accepted no later than September 22, 2017). Proposal should include:

  1. Proposed activities, cost estimates and timeline for the various components of the project.
  2. Resume of the primary person(s) responsible for the development and coordination of the plan.
  3. Access to two comparable reports (environmental scans) done for other groups.
  4. Three references and phone numbers of people for whom you have conducted environmental scans or similar assessments.

Role of the NCCDH:

The NCCDH will be responsible for the following tasks:

  1. Choosing the consultant.
  2. Establishing an advisory committee.
  3. Approving plans and components of the environmental scan.
  4. Providing consultation, e.g. contributing to identification of key informants and key documents for review, including providing contact information.
  5. Providing translation of key informant and focus group invitations and interview guides.
  6. Providing translation of interview transcripts and all final reports.
  7. Providing timely review of draft reports; and, timely approvals of plans and reports.

Role of the Consultant

The successful consultant will be responsible for the following tasks:

  1. Providing a plan with timeline for each component.
  2. Conducting these components with input from the advisory committee and NCCDH staff within the designated timeframe.
  3. Providing necessary staff to conduct interviews and focus group(s) in French.
  4. Providing all necessary staff and equipment to conduct the components of the environmental scan, including, but not limited to, recording capability, transcription, etc. as required.

Selection Criteria and Process

The following are the criteria we will use in the selection process:

  • Detailed plan and timeline (including projected costs for each component).
  • Potential for excellent working relationship.
  • Evidence of high standards in conduct of environmental scan and report writing.
  • Experience working with clients in public health or other related sector, knowledge of knowledge mobilization and system change, and familiarity with virtual environments and national scope.
  • Knowledge of health equity, social determinants of health, and social justice concepts.
  • Demonstration of capacity to engage with and learn from public health organizations and practitioners functioning in French and serving Francophone Canadians.
  • Strong recommendations from references.
  • Compliance with deadline.

The proposal will be reviewed in detail according to the above criteria. Selection will be made by April 10, 2017, and all applicants will be promptly notified.

If you have any questions, please contact Faith Layden at flayden@stfx.ca

Your electronic submission should be sent by 4:00 pm EST on March 31, 2017 to:
Faith Layden (flayden@stfx.ca)
 

Webinar: Design and modus operandi of a tool based on a reflexive approach (Reflex-ISS) to encourage the integration of equity into public health practices

  • Friday, March 17, 2017 (English) 1-2:00 EDT
  • Wednesday, March 22, 2017 (French) 1-2:00 EDT

The REFLEX-ISS tool was created to help stakeholders identify and address social inequalities of health at every stage of their action to improve population health. This tool was recently adapted and tested in Quebec. Throughout a project life cycle, the tool helps galvanize conversation between stakeholders working in partnership. It builds on reflexive and meaningful professional practices through which stakeholders working together on an intervention can collectively consider how they are addressing social inequalities of health in their approach and explore potential improvements.

The webinar will be used to promote the tool, and examine how to apply it using the case example of the Montérégie (Québec) public health unit. We will also discuss the added value of the REFLEX-ISS tool as a collaborative approach to better address social inequalities of health in public health interventions.

Webinar participants will:

  • Learn how to use the tool, its application, structure, content, and general approach;
  • Know how it was adapted and tested in Quebec to meet the realities of different practice settings;
  • Understand the added value of the REFLEX-ISS tool, as well as relevant challenges, opportunities and steps;
  • Discuss barriers and facilitators of a reflexive approach to reduce social inequalities of health;
  • Question the tool’s application in their work environment: facilitators, barriers, successes;
  • Interact with professionals involved in the design and field testing of the tool;
  • Share their experience in terms of actions to address social inequalities of health.

Presenters:

  • Dr. Anne Guichard, Assistant Professor, Community Health, Faculty of Nursing, Laval University
  • Ginette Lafontaine, MSc, President of the Americas Chapter, Réseau francophone international pour la promotion de la santé (RÉFIPS), and Teaching Assistant, Microprogram in Public Health, University of Montreal
  • Dr. Kareen Nour, Manager, Threat Management and Environmental Health, Centre intégré de santé et de services sociaux de la Montérégie-Centre/Public Health Department, and Clinical Associate Professor, School of Public Health, University of Montreal

Facilitator: Sume Ndumbe-Eyoh, Knowledge Translation Specialist, NCCDH

Design and modus operandi of a tool based on a reflexive approach (Reflex-ISS) to encourage the integration of equity into public health practices

 

To register for the webinar in English, click here.

Pour vous inscrire au webinaire en français, cliquez ici

Webinaire : Intersectionnalité et équité en santé : exploration des possibilités en matière de politiques et de pratiques en santé publique

Presented by the National Collaborating Centres for Determinants of Health and Healthy Public Policy.

This webinar will be delivered in English on December, 12, 2016 at 1-2:30 p.m. EST under the title, “Intersectionality and health equity: exploring opportunities for public health practice and policy”. Click here to register for the webinar in English.

Intersectionality is an approach that puts forward the idea that multiple social positions (e.g., age, culture, (dis)ability, ethnicity, indigeneity, gender, immigrant status, race, sexual orientation, social class, and religion) intersect at the level of individual experience to reflect multiple interlocking/intersecting systems of privilege and oppression at the macro, social-structural level (e.g., racism, sexism, heterosexism). With its focus on multiple historically oppressed populations, alongside an explicit analysis and intervention on systems of power and privilege, intersectionality is a natural fit for equity-oriented public health practice and policy. 

An intersectionality-based framework fosters a deep understanding of the lived experiences of marginalized populations and explores the complexities of health inequities.  Furthermore embracing intersectionality will help  practitioners better identify public health problems and generate meaningful and lasting solutions.

This webinar will introduce participants to the concept of intersectionality and discuss opportunities to incorporate intersectionality into the theory, design, analysis, and interpretation of public health actions to improve health equity. This will be of particular interest for those seeking to influence the structural determinants of health/causes-of-the-causes.

The presenters will discuss their understanding of intersectionality and how it can be applied in public health practice, policy and research focused on the social determinants of health and health equity. They will identify opportunities to better integrate an intersectional lens into various aspects of equity-oriented public health activity.

Presenters:

  • Nathalie Sasseville, Professor of Social Work, Université du Québec à Chicoutimi 
  • Dr. Catherine Flynn, Associate Professor, Department of Psychosociology and Social Work, Université du Québec à Chicoutimi
  • Dr. Chantal Maillé, Professor, Simone de Beauvoir Institute & Womens Studies, Concordia University

Facilitators:

  • Val Morrison, Research Officer, NCCHPP
  • Sume Ndumbe-Eyoh, Knowledge Translation Specialist, NCCDH

Click here to register.

Resources

 Watch and listen to a recording of the webinar (in French). Duration: 1 hour. Format: YouTube video. 

Webinar: Intersectionality and health equity: Exploring opportunities for public health practice and policy

Presented by the National Collaborating Centres for Determinants of Health and Healthy Public Policy.

This webinar will also be delivered in French on December 13, 2016 at 1-2:00 p.m. EST.

Watch and listen to a recording of the webinar. Duration: 1.5 hours. Format: YouTube video

Intersectionality is an approach that puts forward the idea that multiple social positions (e.g., age, culture, (dis)ability, ethnicity, indigeneity, gender, immigrant status, race, sexual orientation, social class, and religion) intersect at the level of individual experience to reflect multiple interlocking/intersecting systems of privilege and oppression at the macro, social-structural level (e.g., racism, sexism, heterosexism). With its focus on multiple historically oppressed populations, alongside an explicit analysis and intervention on systems of power and privilege, intersectionality is a natural fit for equity-oriented public health practice and policy.

An intersectionality-based framework fosters a deep understanding of the lived experiences of marginalized populations and explores the complexities of health inequities.  Furthermore embracing intersectionality will help  practitioners better identify public health problems and generate meaningful and lasting solutions.

This webinar will introduce participants to the concept of intersectionality and discuss opportunities to incorporate intersectionality into the theory, design, analysis, and interpretation of public health actions to improve health equity. This will be of particular interest for those seeking to influence the structural determinants of health/causes-of-the-causes.

The presenters will discuss their understanding of intersectionality and how it can be applied in public health practice, policy and research focused on the social determinants of health and health equity. They will identify opportunities to better integrate an intersectional lens into various aspects of equity-oriented public health activity.

Presenters:

  • Natalie Clark, Violence Counsellor and Associate Professor, Faculty of Education and Social Work, Thompson Rivers University
  • Ruth Cameron, Executive Director, AIDS Committee of Cambridge Kitchener Waterloo and Area
  • Samiya Abdi, Health promotion consultant, Health Promotion, Chronic Disease and Injury Prevention, Public Health Ontario
  • Dr. Olena Hankivsky, Professor & Director, Institute for Intersectionality Research and Policy, Simon Fraser University

Facilitators: 

  • Sume Ndumbe-Eyoh, Knowledge Translation Specialist, NCCDH
  • Val Morrison, Research Officer, NCCHPP

Click here to register.

Resources

 

  • Presenters:
  • Sume Ndumbe-Eyoh
    Sume Ndumbe-Eyoh

    Sume Ndumbe-Eyoh, MHSc

    Senior Knowledge Translation Specialist

    Sume has professional experiences in equity-focused organizational and community development and change, social justice education, HIV/AIDS prevention, research, knowledge translation, evaluation and women's rights with local, provincial and global organizations. Sume has previously contributed to teams at the Program Training and Consultation Centre of the Smoke Free Ontario Strategy, the Regional Diversity Roundtable, Ontario HIV Treatment Network, Southern African AIDS Trust and the Centre for Social Justice. Sume holds a Masters of Health Sciences in Health Promotion and Global Health from the University of Toronto.

    seyoh@stfx.ca

Webinar: Moving from equity of care to equity of outcomes - Strengthening organizational and health system performance to report and act on the social determinants of health

This is the third in a four-part webinar series exploring current Canadian issues associated with equity-integrated population health status reporting, equity indicators, local data and health equity outcomes. The focus is on data to drive community action to improve health equity. Each webinar features special guests to showcase the diversity of strategies and approaches being undertaken across Canada. 

This webinar will explore “accreditation” and health equity from two different perspectives. We will learn about:

  • How health equity has been integrated into the standards of the U.S. Public Health Accreditation Board and what has been learned during the first 3 years of implementation.
  • The Winnipeg Regional Health Authority’s (WRHA) experience participating in an accreditation process focused on their “Population Health and Wellness Standard” as part of their health equity work.

The presenters will be asked to reflect on the role of quality improvement and accreditation processes to support action on health inequity.

Presenters:

  • Robin Wilcox, Chief Program Officer, Public Health Accreditation Board (PHAB)
  • Sharon Kuropatwa, Community Area Director and Director for Housing, Supports and Services Integration, Winnipeg Regional Health Authority (WRHA)
  • Jo-Ann Julien, Health Planning and Program Specialist, Public Health Services, County of San Diego Health & Human Services Agency

Facilitators:

  • Lesley Dyck, NCCDH knowledge translation specialist
  • Dianne Oickle, NCCDH knowledge translation specialist

Who should attend?

This webinar is intended for public health stakeholders at all levels working in public health organizations on health equity issues. Cross-disciplinary groups are encouraged to attend to stimulate conversation at the local level.

Click here to register.

For more information on the webinars in this series, please contact Lesley Dyck, NCCDH knowledge translation specialist.

Watch and listen to a recording of the webinar. Duration: 1.5 hours. Format: YouTube video. 

Webinar: Inequalities cost. How can economic analysis help us find solutions?

This webinar will explore:

  • Data about overall Canadian health care costs and predictions for the next decade (societal trends)
  • Data about how much health inequalities cost the Canadian health system and issues of data gathering, analysis and inference
  • Examples of research and practice supporting greater investment in the determinants of health
  • The importance of pilot projects in exploring the potential for reducing inequities, improving health and reducing costs
  • Arguments for changing how we proportion health care dollars

This webinar presents the findings of two new reports and a renowned health program that addresses social inequity and its impact on health

Advisors on tap:

  • Andrea Long, Acting Senior Policy Analyst, Social Determinants and Science Integration Directorate, Public Health Agency of Canada
  • Olga Milliken, PhD, Economist, Centre for Chronic Disease Prevention, Public Health Agency of Canada
  • Jeff Turnbull, Chief, Clinical Quality, Health Quality Ontario
  • Karen Fish, Knowledge translation specialist, NCCDH

Click here to register.

 Watch and listen to a recording of the webinar. Duration: 1.5 hours. Format: YouTube video. 

Call for NCCDH advisory board members

The NCCDH is seeking two individuals, one being a graduate or post-grad student, to serve on our advisory board.

The NCCDH’s advisory board provides guidance and insight to our scientific director, and contributes to NCCDH projects. In return, board members deepen their networks with other strategic change makers, increase their knowledge of equity-focused public health, and experience the satisfaction of contributing to important work. The board meets two or three times per year (once in person, at least once by teleconference). Meetings and related documents are in English.

Our ideal candidates:

  • Are committed to public health and passionate about reducing health inequities;
  • Recognize how the ‘right’ knowledge and skills can be used to improve population health equity;
  • Are strategic, big picture thinkers, yet are pragmatic enough to bring a ‘let’s do it’ approach;
  • Bring an understanding of pan-Canadian perspectives and diversity;
  • Are invigorated by concepts such as complexity, knowledge translation, social justice, intersectionality, collective impact, and health gradient;
  • Have leadership experience and have served on boards and/or contributed to committees/planning groups in the past.

The student candidate must be studying at a Masters, PhD or post-doctorate level during the 2016-17 academic year. The selected student board member will be studying public health; a public health discipline-specialty such as nursing, nutrition, dentistry or medicine; or a field that will be applied within public health such as health promotion, policy analysis, epidemiology or community development.

NCCDH celebrates diversity and especially welcomes applications from Indigenous persons, people of colour, Francophones, and individuals who were raised or make their home in Northwest Territories, Yukon, Nunavut, Alberta, Saskatchewan, New Brunswick, Prince Edward Island, Nova Scotia, or Newfoundland and Labrador.

The two selected board members will begin a three-year term in the fall of 2016. The board will meet in person on November 7 and 8, tentatively in Winnipeg. Costs are covered by the NCCDH.

Those interested should submit a resume/CV and a two-page maximum cover letter, in English or French, explaining why they are interested in becoming an advisory board member, and what they would contribute if selected, to Shim Pang at nccdh@stfx.ca. Deadline for applications is September 11, 2016.

Webinar: Trends in income-related health inequalities - How data is being connected to interventions to drive community action

This is the second in a four-part webinar series exploring current Canadian issues associated with equity-integrated population health status reporting, equity indicators, local data and health equity outcomes. The focus is on data to drive community action to improve health equity. Each webinar features special guests to showcase the diversity of strategies and approaches being undertaken across Canada. 

This webinar will focus on two examples of how equity reporting is connecting to interventions to drive action on addressing health inequities. It will showcase the Trends in Income-Related Health Inequalities in Canada report from CIHI, as well as the recent The Unequal City 2015 report by Toronto Public Health.

This webinar will explore:

  • The Trends in Income-Related Health Inequalities in Canada report from CIHI, including a quick demonstration of the E-Tool and a discussion of the approach to finding and including evidence-based interventions, with a focus on diabetes.
  • The Unequal City 2015 report by Toronto Public Health and how it was used, along with other local health equity data, to support the development of diabetes prevention interventions to address health equity issues in Toronto.

Advisors on tap:

  • Erin Pichora is a Program Lead with the Canadian Population Health Initiative (CPHI) at the Canadian Institute for Health Information (CIHI). CPHI carries out research and analysis, evidence synthesis and performance measurement with the aim of supporting policy makers and health system managers in their efforts to improve population health and reduce health inequalities in Canada. As part of this team, Erin played a lead role in the development the Trends in Income-related Health Inequalities Canada project released in 2015. She is currently involved in stakeholder engagement activities to advance the measurement of equity in healthcare in Canada. Prior to joining CIHI in 2010, Erin worked as an Epidemiologist with the Populations Studies and Surveillance branch at Cancer Care Ontario.
  • Erika Khandor is an epidemiologist at Toronto Public Health. Her work focuses on health equity, the health status of marginalized populations and the social determinants of health. Projects she has recently worked on have explored the relationships between income, immigration, aging and health.  Erika holds a Master of Health Sciences (MHSc) degree in public health (health promotion) from the University of Toronto. Before working at Toronto Public Health, she conducted community-based research, advocacy, program planning and evaluation in community-based organizations.
  • Lisa Swimmer is a Manager of Chronic Disease and Injury Prevention with Toronto Public Health and a Registered Dietitian.  Her areas of work have included diabetes prevention, heart health, student nutrition, early childhood nutrition, healthy public policy and menu labelling. Prior to working in the public health system, she worked as a Food Access Coordinator and Community Dietitian at a Community Health Centre. Lisa is a graduate of the University of Western Ontario with a Bachelor of Science in Food and Nutrition and completed a Master of Health Science in Community Nutrition at the University of Toronto.

Facilitators:

  • Lesley Dyck, NCCDH knowledge translation specialist
  • Dianne Oickle, NCCDH knowledge translation specialist

Who should attend?

This webinar is intended for public health stakeholders at all levels working in public health organizations on health equity issues. Cross-disciplinary groups are encouraged to attend to stimulate conversation at the local level.

Click here to register.

For more information on the webinars in this series, please contact Lesley Dyck, NCCDH knowledge translation specialist.

Webinar: Mapping equity - Using data mapping to drive cross-sector collaboration

This is the first in a four-part webinar series exploring current Canadian issues associated with equity-integrated population health status reporting, equity indicators, local data and health equity outcomes. The focus is on data to drive community action to improve health equity. Each webinar features special guests to showcase the diversity of strategies and approaches being undertaken across Canada. 

This webinar will focus on two examples of how mapping equity indicators has supported intersectoral collaboration between public health and municipal planners, and between public health and primary health care. It will introduce the Canadian Council on Social Determinants of Health (CCSDH) resource, “Maps to Inform Intersectoral Planning and Action.”

This webinar will explore:

  • The CommunityView Collaboration data sharing tool developed jointly by the Saskatoon Regional Health Authority and the City of Saskatoon.
  • Local public health and primary care partnership in advancing health equity and SDOH in the Kingston, Frontenac, and Lennox & Addington region (Ontario), including the SDOH Mapper

Advisors on tap:

  • Bill Holden is a senior planner in the City of Saskatoon Community Services Department, Planning and Development Branch. He manages the Mapping and Research Group, which is responsible for developing and reporting information relevant to land use and community development. Bill is also coordinator of the Community View Collaboration: Building Evidence for Action website (CVC), a member of the Federation of Canadian Municipalities Quality of Life Reporting System technical team, and the community co-director of the Community University Institute of Social Research (CUISR) in Saskatoon. He is responsible for upholding the City of Saskatoon’s 25 year commitment to maintaining neighbourhood based information for evidence-informed decision-making.
  • Dr. Kieran Moore is the associate medical officer of health with KFL&A Public Health. He has extensive experience in surveillance systems for bioterrorism and outbreak detection, public health, pre-hospital care, and multidisciplinary research projects. His main areas of interest are the evaluation of various data streams for the early detection of outbreaks, as well as the assessment of deprivation distribution in populations. His work with the Queen’s University Public Health Informatics Team (QPHI) Acute Care and Health Care Worker absenteeism real-time surveillance system and provincial Telehealth data have been published in the Canadian Journal of Emergency Medicine, the European Journal of Emergency Medicine, Advances in Disease Surveillance, and the Canadian Journal of Public Health.

Facilitators:

  • Dianne Oickle, NCCDH knowledge translation specialist
  • Lesley Dyck, NCCDH knowledge translation specialist

Who should attend?

This webinar is intended for public health stakeholders at all levels working in public health organizations on health equity issues. Cross-disciplinary groups are encouraged to attend to stimulate conversation at the local level.

Click here to register.

For more information on the webinars in this series, please contact Lesley Dyck, NCCDH knowledge translation specialist.


 

Webinar series 2016: Equity reporting in action

Over the course of four webinars, we will explore current Canadian issues associated with equity-integrated population health status reporting, equity indicators, local data and health equity outcomes.  The series will focus on data to drive community action to improve health equity.

Each webinar will feature special guests to showcase the diversity of strategies and approaches being undertaken across Canada. Guests and facilitators will bridge research and practice in public health, building on the ‘Assess and report’ resources already available in the NCCDH Resource Library.

WEBINAR SCHEDULE
(Please note, topics and guests will be revised closer to the date of each webinar. Contact us for more information)

Tuesday, April 26, 2016 
Mapping Equity: using data mapping to drive cross-sector collaboration

Thursday, June 23, 2016
Trends in income-related health inequalities: How data is being connected to interventions to drive community action

Thursday, October 27, 2016
Moving from equity of care to equity of outcomes: Strengthening organizational and health system performance to report and act on the social determinants of health

  • Showcasing current approaches being undertaken by provincial quality councils and accreditation processes to integrate health equity issues

Theme: Observatory system: Is it time to revisit an investment in the necessary infrastructure?

  • Showcasing current provincial level population health data strategies and the development of “virtual” observatories

This webinar has been postponed. The date will be confirmed shortly.

Who should attend?

This webinar series is intended for public health stakeholders at all levels working in public health organizations on health equity issues. Cross-disciplinary groups are encouraged to attend to stimulate conversation at the local level.

REGISTRATION

To register, click the link to each individual webinar.

Recommended reading:

  1. Purposeful reporting for health equity
  2. The role of public health
  3. The importance of local data
  4. Learning together
  5. Using data to drive change

We want to hear from you!
Do you have suggestions for topics that are central to your work? We’re always looking for new ideas and suggested presenters, so please be in touch! 

For more information, contact Lesley Dyck, Knowledge Translation Specialist.
 

Webinar: Can a guaranteed annual income help level the playing field?

Guaranteed annual income (also called basic income guarantee) is experiencing a resurgence as a public policy approach to improving economic and social wellbeing. Analysis of data from the MINCOME study, in which Manitoba residents (in Dauphin and some parts of Winnipeg) were guaranteed an annual income, has been very influential for policy makers considering basic income support as a population-level intervention. Public health agencies and associations have expressed their support for guaranteed annual income, and the Government of Ontario recently announced that it will fund a pilot basic income project in the province.

This webinar will focus on the effects of guaranteed income policies on wellbeing. It will also explore the role of public health actors in supporting guaranteed income policies.

This webinar is the first in a three part series on the evidence, rationale and support for policies and interventions regarding the everyday living and working conditions that affect health.

Part 1 & 2 of this series will be also be offered in French. Click here to receive notification of the French webinars.

Advisors on tap:

Evelyn Forget, BA, MA, PhD
Professor, Department of Community Health Sciences, University of Manitoba
Academic Director of the Manitoba Research Data Centre

Lisa Simon, MD MPH CCFP FRCPC
Associate Medical Officer of Health, Simcoe Muskoka District Health Unit
alPHa/OPHA Health Equity Work Group

Facilitator:

Sume Ndumbe-Eyoh, Hons BSc, MHSc
Knowledge Translation Specialist, National Collaborating Centre for Determinants of Health (NCCDH)

Click here to register.

NCCDH at TOPHC 2016

Are you attending The Ontario Public Health Convention (TOPHC) in Toronto? If so, join us for this NCCDH presentation:

Day 2 – Tuesday, April 5th 2016 3:00 p.m. - 4:30 p.m.

Advocacy and economic arguments: Opportunities and challenges

  • Presented by Sume Ndumbe-Eyoh, NCC for Determinants of Health (Workshop, Room TBD)

Follow us on Twitter @NCCDH_CCNDS! We will be tweeting using the hashtag #TOPHC2016.

You can also connect in person with Pemma Muzumdar, NCCPH communications coordinator, at the NCCs for Public Health outreach booth to hear news from all six NCCs.

For more information, including the full conference program, event blog, and registration details, visit the TOPHC 2016 website.

  • Presenters:
  • Sume Ndumbe-Eyoh
    Sume Ndumbe-Eyoh

    Sume Ndumbe-Eyoh, MHSc

    Senior Knowledge Translation Specialist

    Sume has professional experiences in equity-focused organizational and community development and change, social justice education, HIV/AIDS prevention, research, knowledge translation, evaluation and women's rights with local, provincial and global organizations. Sume has previously contributed to teams at the Program Training and Consultation Centre of the Smoke Free Ontario Strategy, the Regional Diversity Roundtable, Ontario HIV Treatment Network, Southern African AIDS Trust and the Centre for Social Justice. Sume holds a Masters of Health Sciences in Health Promotion and Global Health from the University of Toronto.

    seyoh@stfx.ca

Call for applications - Knowledge translation graduate student awards

Each year, the six NCCs for Public Health recognize the work of graduate students regarding knowledge translation (KT) in public health in Canada. Up to three awards will be given annually at the CPHA Annual Conference, Public Health 2016. Travel, accommodation and registration fees will be covered up to a maximum of $1,500.

Eligibility

Applications are open to students who are currently enrolled in a graduate program (full or part-time) OR students who completed a graduate degree in the last 12 months. Applicants must be students at a Canadian academic institution, and in a discipline relevant to public health.

To download the application form, click here. Please note that the deadline for applications is March 28, 2016.

For further information, please contact Donna Ciliska at ciliska@mcmaster.ca. 

Webinar: Public health discipline-specific competencies - Do they guide equity-focused practice?

This webinar will look at the inclusion of the social determinants of health (SDH), health equity and social justice in public health discipline specific competencies to support action on health equity.  Guest speakers will discuss the impact of competencies on front-line public health practice, what supports the translation of equity and SDH content of competencies into program and policy decisions, and how these factors can frame workforce capacity to address health equity.

This webinar will explore:

  • How Canada compares in using competencies to further public health action to advance health equity
  • How professional associations can embed the concepts of health equity, SDH, and social justice more explicitly into discipline-specific competencies
  • Options to strengthen public health competencies across disciplines to ensure action on the SDH, and health equity
  • The role of competencies to take health equity beyond individual professional responsibility and support organizational direction to address health equity

Advisors on tap:

Claire Betker, Program Director, Population Health & Health Equity, Manitoba Health

Kevin Churchill, Manager, Health Promotion, County of Lambton

Phi Phan, Provincial Manager, Safe Healthy Environments, Alberta Health Services 

Facilitators:

Dianne Oickle, Knowledge Translation Specialist, National Collaborating Centre for Determinants of Health (NCCDH)

Karen Fish, Knowledge Translation Specialist, National Collaborating Centre for Determinants of Health (NCCDH)

Who should attend?

This webinar will be of interest to regional and local health authorities, provincial/territorial/national organizations, health professional regulatory bodies, health professional training programs, policy makers, and public health practitioners at all levels working to address the determinants of health and health equity in Canada.

Click here to register.

Recommended reading:

4th Annual Social Determinants of Health Nurses In-Person Meeting

Organized by the Social Determinant of Health Public Health Nurse Network with support from the National Collaborating Centre for Determinants of Health

This is a scent-free event.

Across Ontario public health units, nurses are playing a leadership role in advancing the social determinants of health and health equity. The purpose of this annual gathering of Social determinants of health nurses is to support learning, knowledge exchange and networking.

The meeting objectives are to:

  • Identify strategies for advocacy at the municipal level
  • Explore strategies and tools for thriving in your SDOH role and support renewed motivation for your work
  • Gain knowledge of colleagues’ activities and tools they have developed
  • Connect with those doing similar work

The full day event will include presentations, story sharing and interactive sessions on strategies to address the SDH and health equity in public health organizations.

Who should attend:

The workshop is tailored for social determinants of health nurses. It is however open to all public health practitioners in working on the social determinants of health and health equity.

Speakers:

  • Joe Mihevc, Toronto City Councilor & Toronto Board of Health Member
  • Pegeen Walsh, Executive Director, Ontario Public Health Association
  • SDH PHNs

Planning Team:

  • Alison Dunn, Haldimand-Norfolk Health Unit
  • Jennifer Schnitzer, Toronto Public Health
  • Julie Hill, Region of Waterloo Public Health
  • Lisa Brankley, North Bay Parry Sound Health Unit
  • Margaret MacDonald, Eastern Ontario Health Unit
  • Marilyn King, Huron County Health Unit
  • Monica Banz, Grey Bruce Public Health Unit
  • Sume Ndumbe-Eyoh, National Collaborating Centre for Determinants of Health 

Registration: $75 (breakfast and lunch provided)

Registration closes on March 22nd at noon. Click here to register.

Webinar: Acting across sectors - frameworks for moving forward on the social determinants of health

Frameworks are often used to visually represent complex ideas or concepts. Numerous frameworks exist to help explain the relationship between the social determinants and health experiences and outcomes. The Canadian Council on the Social Determinants of Health, a multi sectoral council commissioned a review of existing frameworks to identify those that support action across multiple sectors.

The review provides in-depth analysis of the seven frameworks deemed most useful for the purposes of leveraging action across sectors. These frameworks and the accompanying analysis can help shift public health practice towards more intersectoral, development-oriented upstream approaches.

The webinar will:

  • Explore components of relevant frameworks that support action across sectors
  • Highlight the use of selected frameworks in practice and policy settings
  • Discuss future directions for the development and application of frameworks

Advisors on tap:

Connie Clement, Scientific Director, National Collaborating Centre for Determinants of Health

Joey Edwardh, Executive Director, Community Development Halton

Dr. Trevor Hancock, Professor and Senior Scholar, School of Public Health and Social Policy University of Victoria

Sume Ndumbe-Eyoh, Knowledge Translation Specialist, National Collaborating Centre for Determinants of Health

Click here to register.

Resource:

Canadian Council on Social Determinants of Health. (2015). A Review of Frameworks on the Determinants of Health. Ottawa, ON: Author www.ccsdh.ca

  • Presenters:
  • Connie Clement
    Connie Clement

    Connie Clement, BSc

    Scientific Director Emeritus

    Connie Clement joined the NCCDH in January 2011. Before working with the NCCDH, she spent nearly three decades at Toronto Public Health as director of policy and planning when six public health units merged, and held varied management and front-line health promotion and sexual health positions. Connie was also the executive director of Health Nexus/Nexus Santé, an Ontario-oriented health promotion organization, and of Social Venture Partners Toronto, a venture philanthropy collaborative; she was also managing editor and collective member of Women Healthsharing. Connie holds a BSc in Biology/Sociology from Trent University. Connie received the Canadian Public Health Association’s certificate of merit in 2014.

    cclement@stfx.ca
  • Sume Ndumbe-Eyoh
    Sume Ndumbe-Eyoh

    Sume Ndumbe-Eyoh, MHSc

    Senior Knowledge Translation Specialist

    Sume has professional experiences in equity-focused organizational and community development and change, social justice education, HIV/AIDS prevention, research, knowledge translation, evaluation and women's rights with local, provincial and global organizations. Sume has previously contributed to teams at the Program Training and Consultation Centre of the Smoke Free Ontario Strategy, the Regional Diversity Roundtable, Ontario HIV Treatment Network, Southern African AIDS Trust and the Centre for Social Justice. Sume holds a Masters of Health Sciences in Health Promotion and Global Health from the University of Toronto.

    seyoh@stfx.ca

NCCDH Presents Dr. Ryan Meili Public Lecture Series

The National Collaborating Centre for the Determinants of Health (NCCDH) has invited Dr. Ryan Meili to present a series of public lectures in Nova Scotia and New Brunswick.

Dr. Meili is the executive director of Upstream, a Saskatoon-based non-profit that works to reframe public discourse around addressing the social determinants of health in order to build a healthier society. He is also a community physician, author and professor.

Ryan will be presenting March 1st, 2016 at Crowne Plaza Fredericton, March 2nd at St.FX University and March 3rd at Dalhousie University. The lecture being delivered is called, “Building a Healthy Society: Upstream Action for Equity.”

His talks in Nova Scotia will promote leadership in addressing the social determinants of health, health equity and ‘upstream’ thinking as a movement to support the improvement of population health.

Components of the talk will be Ryan’s personal story of leadership, how the concept of working ‘upstream’ applies to student’s future careers as professionals and understanding the health advocate role.

In N.B., Ryan will explore the role of government in addressing the social determinants of health and reducing health inequities. He will help staff within the Office of the Chief Medical Officer of Health and the Social and Economic Inclusion Corporation to share projects and build partnerships around policy and program interventions.

 

Fredericton, N.B.

Title: Building a Healthy New Brunswick: Acting Together for Equity

Date: Tuesday, March 1, 2016 at 7 p.m.

Location: Crowne Plaza Fredericton – 659 Queen St., Fredericton, N.B.

Presenters:

Dr. Ryan Meili – Founding director of Upstream, family physician, author and assistant professor based in Saskatoon.

Lucie Chiasson – Registered Dietician, Regional Wellness Consultant for the Miramichi/Kent region, Wellness Branch, Department of Social Development.

Isabella Imperatori – Community Inclusion Network Coordinator, Region 7 (Miramichi), Economic and Social Inclusion Corporation.

A representative of the New Brunswick Community Harvest Garden.

Language: English

Link to event: www.healthyNB.eventbrite.ca

 

StFX University

Title: Building a Healthy Society: Upstream Action for Equity

Date: Wednesday, March 2, 2016 at 7 - 8:15 p.m.

Location: Schwartz Auditorium, StFX University Campus, Antigonish, N.S.

Presenter: Dr. Ryan Meili – Founding director of Upstream, family physician, author and professor based in Saskatoon.

Language: English

 

Dalhousie University

Title: Health Care Teams Addressing Poverty and the Determinants of Health

Date: Thursday, March 3, 2016 at 5 – 7 p.m.

Location: Theatre A, Sir Charles Tupper Medical Building – 5850 College St., Halifax, N.S. Room 105, Dalhousie Medicine New Brunswick – 100 Tucker Park Rd., Saint John, N.B. (This will be a satellite site. The Dal Halifax presentation will be broadcast here via videoconference).

Presenters:

Dr. Ryan Meili - Founding director of Upstream, family physician, author and professor based in Saskatoon

Dr. Cindy Forbes – President, Canadian Medical Association

Dr. Barb Hamilton-Hinch – Assistant Professor, Dalhousie School of Health and Human Performance

Language: English

Link to event: https://upstreamactiondalmed.eventbrite.ca

StFX Canada Research Chair

The National Collaborating Centre for Determinants of Health (NCCDH) is pleased to announce that our host organization, StFX University, has created a Tier 2 Canada Research Chair (CRC) position in Health Equity & Social Justice. The Chair will build on initiatives already underway at StFX, including the work of the NCCDH.

StFX is seeking a leader to orchestrate an original and high quality research program focused on the social determinants of health for marginalized populations. Preference will be given to those candidates interested in working with Mi’kmaw and African Nova Scotians.

Applications will be accepted beginning February 15, 2016. Please note applications should include a curriculum vita, a description of the proposed research program, and a summary of experience with mentorship and training. The complete job advertisement can be found at: http://sites.stfx.ca/hr/aut_opportunities/

Webinar: Communicating for change as a component of strategic communications in public health. Talking about how where we live, work and play affects health

Public awareness of and support for the social determinants of health (SDH) can be a key driver for policy change to improve everyday living conditions and promote more equitable distribution of power and resources for health. Over the past few years there has been a concerted effort by a range of organizations to develop effective communication tools and resources which reflect the realities of the local context that will engage Canadians on the concepts of the SDH and health equity. Communicators within public health agencies have a unique role to play to effectively convey the relationship between the socioeconomic environment and health both internally and with external stakeholders.

This webinar will explore:

  • public perception of the social determinants of health in the Canadian context
  • the relationship between public opinion and policy change
  • principles to improve communications on the social determinants of health
  • integrating key principles of SDH and health equity into strategic communications
  • principles to develop messages that consider the complexity and value-laden characteristics of these concepts

This webinar is for communicators with responsibility for strategic and health communications in public health organizations.

Advisors on Tap:

Sume Ndumbe-Eyoh, Knowledge Translation Specialist, NCCDH

Others TBC

With the support of the Ontario Association of Public Health Communicators

To register for this webinar click here.

Resources:

Webinar: Housing, health equity and opportunities for public health

This webinar will look at the direct effect of housing conditions on health, how exposures to risk conditions impact vulnerabilities and consequences experienced by populations, and why this is an important public health concern.  Guest speakers will highlight intersectoral research initiatives that consider the impact of housing conditions on health, and describe various roles that public health can play to address these issues. Public health involvement in community engaged health promotion and regulatory jurisdiction to address housing will both be explored. 


With our special guests we will explore:

• Housing as an upstream social determinant of health and how it intersects with other determinants to impact health equity
• Research to address housing related environmental health risks
• Practice-based examples to illustrate how public health can be involved in housing related issues
• Cross-sectoral collaboration as an opportunity to address housing related risks to health

Advisors on tap:

Erica Phipps
Executive Director
Canadian Partnership for Children’s Health and the Environment (CPCHE)

Vittoria Vecchiarelli
Senior Public Health Inspector
Health Hazard Prevention and Management, Regional Municipality of York

Rebecca Johnson
Environmental Health Officer
Vulnerable Populations Coordinator, Alberta Health Services

Facilitators:

Dianne Oickle
Knowledge Translation Specialist,
National Collaborating Centre for Determinants of Health (NCCDH)


Karen Fish
Knowledge Translation Specialist,
National Collaborating Centre for Determinants of Health (NCCDH)

Who should attend?
This webinar will be of interest to regional and local health authorities, provincial/territorial/national organizations, researchers, policy makers, government departments, public health practitioners at all levels, and intersectoral partners working to address the determinants of health and health equity in Canada.

Registration Link

 

Recommended reading:

Let’s Talk:  Moving Upstream

Housing Need in Canada:  Healthy Lives Start at Home

Pathways to improving well-being for Indigenous peoples: How living conditions decide health
 

 

Continuing down the path: doing the work of improving health equity and addressing the challenges of organizational change

“Like most health units, we have a long history of caring deeply about the well-being of disadvantaged populations, but we didn’t carry out health equity or priority population work in a formal or consistent manner.  Now, that work is becoming more purposeful, more consistent, more comfortable, and more routine.” – Dr. Lisa Simon, Simcoe Muskoka District Health Unit

This webinar will further explore the stories of the Ontario public health units who shared their experience of purposefully integrating health equity into their work, as documented in the case study The Path Taken: Developing organizations capacity for improving health equity in four Ontario health units.

The case study documents how each featured health unit approached health equity in its own unique fashion and provides a summary of success factors and potential tensions common across each organization. 
Guest presenters will describe what the success factors look like in their organization, and how they are tackling their top two potential tensions.  We will also explore the implications for public health organizational capacity in Ontario and other jurisdictions in Canada based on the Organizational Capacity for Public Health Equity Action (OC-PHEA) framework (Cohen et al., 2013).

With our special guests we will explore:
1. How have the success factors been important in advancing the work in each health unit?  Were these factors identified as important in the early stages of organizational capacity building or did they emerge over time?  Do they all continue to be important?
2. Of the six potential tensions identified in the case study, which have been the most important and how has the health unit responded?  Have any of the tensions been resolved?  How was this done?  Are new tensions emerging as the organization develops?
3. How does the OC-PHEA framework help us recognize success factors and address potential tensions? What can we learn from these experiences that will strengthen the OC-PHEA framework and application in public health jurisdictions outside of Ontario? 

Who should attend?
Public health practitioners at all levels will benefit from hearing practical stories about building public health capacity to do the work of improving health equity.


Guest presenters:

Marty Mako – Health Promoter, Public Health, Niagara Region

Dr. Benita Cohen – University of Manitoba

Jennifer Johnston - Public Health Nurse / Health Promotion Specialist, Social Determinants of Health & Health Equity, Healthy Schools Department, Windsor-Essex County Health Unit


Facilitator:

Lesley Dyck, MA
Knowledge Translation Specialist,
National Collaborating Centre for Determinants of Health (NCCDH)

Register here.

Canadian Actions to Advance Work on Health Equity and the Social Determinants of Health

This webinar will highlight the recent report titled “Rio Political Declaration on Social Determinants of Health:  A Snapshot of Canadian Actions 2015” and will include guest speakers on the history and development of this report.  In addition, a case highlighted in the report titled “Overcoming Poverty Together:  The New Brunswick Social and Economic Inclusion Plan 2014-19” will be described as an example of work happening across sectors to address social and economic influences on health and equity.

With our special guests we will explore:

·         Activities undertaken across levels of government and sectors to advance health equity and address social determinants of health in Canada
·         Themes of the Rio Political Declaration on Social Determinants of Health and their application to public health work in Canada
·         Critical components for the sustainability of public health action to address health equity

Advisors on tap:

Mana Herel
Manager of Health Equity Integration
Social Determinants and Science Integration Directorate
Public Health Agency of Canada

Erica DiRuggiero
Deputy Scientific Director
CIHR-Institute of Population and Public Health

Stéphane Leclair
Executive Director
New Brunswick Economic and Social Inclusion Corporation


Facilitators:

Dianne Oickle
Knowledge Translation Specialist,
National Collaborating Centre for Determinants of Health (NCCDH)
 


Who should attend?
This webinar will be of interest to regional and local health authorities, provincial/territorial/national organizations, researchers, policy makers, government departments, public health practitioners at all levels, and intersectoral partners working to address the determinants of health and health equity in Canada.


Recommended reading:

Rio Political Declaration on Social Determinants of Health:  A Snapshot of Canadian Actions 2015

Overcoming Poverty Together:  The New Brunswick Economic and Social Inclusion Plan


Register here.

Ontario forum: A strong voice

The Ontario Public Health Association’s fall forum will take place Oct 29, Chestnut Conference Centre, downtown Toronto. Sub-titled enhance advocacy. Shift policy. Impact society, the forum combines speakers and workshops.The NCCDH will deliver a workshop at the forum about framing an issue for effective influence. Click here to register.

Seven key societal investments for health equity: Scotland, the UK, and Canada Compared

NCCDH with the Atlantic Health Promotion Research Centre, Dalhousie University and IWK, is hosting a public talk by Dr. John Frank, of University Edinburgh and past scientific director of the Institute for Population & Public Health, CIHR. Dr. Frank will discuss evidence of the impact of seven key societal-level investments—made within and outside the health sector— that were expected to improve health equity across socio-economic levels. Dr. Frank will show these largely upstream investments have and have not affected health in Scotland, England and Wales, and Canada.

Monitoring Trends in Health Inequality in Canada

The Canadian Institute for Health Information (CIHI) is hosting a web conference to share information on the importance of examining health inequality trends over time in Canada, with a focus on measuring and interpreting analytical result to inform action on reducing inequalities.

Presenters will include CIHI staff and guest speaker Nancy McPherson, Population Health Planner Analyst from Prairie Mountain Health, Manitoba.

During this webinar, participants will be introduced to:
·         CIHI’s forthcoming “Trends in Income-Related Health Inequalities” products
·         Trends in inequality for a key set of health indicators, including how to interpret indicator trends by income level and measures of inequalities over time
·         Approaches to translating health inequality data into knowledge that can inform action

This webinar is intended for anyone with an interest in monitoring and addressing the health impacts of income inequality in Canada.

This webinar is free but requires participants to log-in to CIHI’s Learning Centre and register by November 25, 2015.  If you already have a username, you can go directly to the Learning Centre to register: https://learning.cihi.ca/users/index.aspx. If you don’t know or have forgotten your username, you need to contact the education department at education@cihi.ca.

Health equity in an era of reform: acting locally through citizen engagement & intersectoral action

19es Journées annuelles de santé publique.  This session will be held in French.

This session is co-hosted by the Quebec Population Health Research Network, the National Collaborating Centre for Determinants of Health and the Institut national de santé publique du Québec.

The think tank is a new concept developed for JASP 2015. Its objective is to share knowledge and ultimately develop the most practical solutions to complex issues inherent to public health. This session will start with a presentation of a real life case, followed by small group discussions. Experts will be invited to provide insight and comment on what emerged from discussions.

Reducing social inequalities of health (SIH) is a fundamental value and drives everyday efforts in public health. To do so, it is critical to act on daily life conditions of individuals (e.g., transportation, housing, school success) and to work in partnership with citizens and a variety of intersectoral actors from the community, i.e. the new centre intégré de santé et de services sociaux (CISSS; health unit), municipalities, local employment centre, school boards, libraries, community organizations, etc.

In this era of profound structural changes in Quebec, particularly in the health and social services sector, it is important to adapt and align collaboration approaches accordingly. Local and regional development dynamics are shifting tremendously and provide opportunities to work together in identifying how we can build on our strengths and work towards reducing SIH. Creation of a single health and social services unit in each region (the CISSS) leads us to reflect on public health interventions that will target specific areas with the objective of efficiently working intersectorally and fostering citizen engagement.

This think tank will provide a breeding ground for ideas. It will help us identify, based on a case study, new ways of promoting the development and sustainability of supportive, fair and inclusive communities with a view to reduce SIH. Participants of different backgrounds are invited to enrich discussions and to share their knowledge gained through research, experience, actions, and management. 

This event is for practitioners, managers, and researchers of various sectors, including education, municipal governments and public health. An interdisciplinary audience would be desirable for a wealth of experiences and ideas to be shared.

More specifically, at the end of the session, participants will have the capacity to:
• recognize issues related to reducing SIH at the regional level;
• identify, in this new context, key levers that would facilitate intersectoral action and citizen engagement;
• develop a course of action to accelerate reduction of SIH at the regional level.

The full program is available at: http://jasp.inspq.qc.ca/2015-laboratoires-d-idees-equite-en-sante-a-l-heure-des-reformes.aspx 

  • Presenters:
  • Sume Ndumbe-Eyoh
    Sume Ndumbe-Eyoh

    Sume Ndumbe-Eyoh, MHSc

    Senior Knowledge Translation Specialist

    Sume has professional experiences in equity-focused organizational and community development and change, social justice education, HIV/AIDS prevention, research, knowledge translation, evaluation and women's rights with local, provincial and global organizations. Sume has previously contributed to teams at the Program Training and Consultation Centre of the Smoke Free Ontario Strategy, the Regional Diversity Roundtable, Ontario HIV Treatment Network, Southern African AIDS Trust and the Centre for Social Justice. Sume holds a Masters of Health Sciences in Health Promotion and Global Health from the University of Toronto.

    seyoh@stfx.ca

Upstream Action for Health Equity and Social Justice

The Public Health Association of Nova Scotia (PHANS) is pleased to host this event in collaboration with the Nova Scotia Department of Health and Wellness, the Nova Scotia Health Authority, and the National Collaborating Centre for Determinants of Health.

Objectives:

  • To enhance participants’ knowledge and practical capacity to work together to advance social justice and equity.
  • To promote networking opportunities by providing an interactive environment for sharing and learning.
  • To increase the use of evidence-based tools and approaches to support health equity and social justice.

Outcomes:

  • Participants will have a greater understanding and practical knowledge of:
  • Potential partners in health equity and social justice work.
  • Strategies to advocate for a social justice and equity focus in day-to-day practice and public policy.
  • How health equity approaches can be applied in practice.
  • How to frame and communicate health equity and social justice to various audiences.


Who Will Attend?

This event is an opportunity for people from all sectors to come together to learn from one another and is open to anyone interested in advancing social justice and  equity through intersectoral upstream action. We anticipate participation from public health, health promotion, primary care, community health, social services, community development, civic engagement, social justice, and more.

Click here to register and for a complete schedule of events. 

Sparking Population Health Solutions – Call for Solutions deadline

CIHR-IPPH is pleased to announce the Trailblazer Award in Population Health Solutions. Up to two awards of $15,000 each will be given to exceptional researchers at different career stages.  Trailblazer award winners will be featured at the IPPH sponsored Sparking Population Health Solutions: Research for a Healthier Future Summit to be held in Ottawa on April 25-28, 2016.

Anticipated Launch Date: October 2015
Anticipated Application Deadline: December 2015

Stay tuned for the launch of this award program on ResearchNet.

Webinar entitled: "Public Health Ethics in Practice: Applying Frameworks to Cases".

The National Collaborating Centre for Healthy Public Policy (NCCHPP) would like to invite you to join  a webinar entitled: "Public Health Ethics in Practice: Applying Frameworks to Cases".

In this webinar, participants will practice applying public health ethics frameworks to cases that we have developed for discussion.

Date: October 1 in English; September 24, 2015 in French.
Time: 2 p.m. to 3 p.m. (EDT) .

During this webinar, we will introduce participants to:

 

  • The general nature and role of ethics frameworks in public health,
  • Summary versions of two public health ethics frameworks, and
  • Cases (drawn from public health and related to healthy public policy) for deliberation using those frameworks.

A big part of this webinar will be focused on a more in-depth application of a framework to a case. Participants will be able to both see and contribute to applying a framework to identify the ethical implications that arise, and to deliberate towards a decision about what to do.

Click here to register.

Click here for slide and audio.

Webinar: Learning to work differently: implementing Ontario’s SDOH Public Health Nurses Initiative

Description

This webinar will present findings from a research study that examined the development and implementation of social determinant of health public health nurse (SDOH PHN) positions across Ontario’s 36 public health agencies. These new positions were funded by the Ministry of Health and Long Term Care (Ontario) to enhance organizational capacity for action on the SDOH and health equity.
The role of leadership in the implementation of the SDH PHN positions and in an organization’s health equity work more broadly will also be discussed. The supports and barriers to implementing equity-focused positions to improve public health organization capacity to act on SDH and advance health equity will be highlighted as well as recommendations for policy, practice, education and research.

This webinar will:

  • enhance your understanding of the supports and barriers for the implementation of health equity positions in Ontario and the relevance to your organization
  • facilitate a discussion about the role of leadership in supporting health equity action
  • discuss the importance of provincial level guidance for local action
  • identify key actions for building the capacity for public health organizations to act on the social determinants of health and health equity

The webinar will be of interest to practitioners, managers, decision-makers and researchers interested in organizational and systems capacity for public health action on the social determinants of health and health equity.

Advisors on Tap:

  • Sume Ndumbe-Eyoh, Knowledge Translation Specialist, National Collaborating Centre for Determinants of Health 
  • Dr. Charmaine McPherson, RN, PhD, Associate Professor, St. Francis Xavier University
  • Diane Oickle, Knowledge Translation Specialist, National Collaborating Centre for Determinants of Health

Register here

Online community conversation

From September 21st to September 25th we will be holding an online conversation in Health Equity Clicks: Community. This will be a great way to start the conversation before and continue the discussion on our learnings from the "Learning to work differently: implementing Ontario's Social Determinants of Health Public Health Nurse Initiative" webinar.  If you have a question or topics you would like our advisors to address, please email Sume, our Knowledge Translation Specialist, at seyoh@stfx.ca.

 

  • Presenters:
  • Charmaine McPherson, 
  • Sume Ndumbe-Eyoh
    Sume Ndumbe-Eyoh

    Sume Ndumbe-Eyoh, MHSc

    Senior Knowledge Translation Specialist

    Sume has professional experiences in equity-focused organizational and community development and change, social justice education, HIV/AIDS prevention, research, knowledge translation, evaluation and women's rights with local, provincial and global organizations. Sume has previously contributed to teams at the Program Training and Consultation Centre of the Smoke Free Ontario Strategy, the Regional Diversity Roundtable, Ontario HIV Treatment Network, Southern African AIDS Trust and the Centre for Social Justice. Sume holds a Masters of Health Sciences in Health Promotion and Global Health from the University of Toronto.

    seyoh@stfx.ca
  • Dianne Oickle
    Dianne Oickle

    Dianne Oickle, MSc, BSc

    Knowledge Translation Specialist

    Dianne is a dietitian with over 15 years’ experience working in public health in Ontario focused on reproductive and child health in a mostly rural setting with many diverse clients. Part of her work involved development of practice guidelines for health professionals, train-the-trainer initiatives, public presentations, educational resource development, working with the media, community coalition and network support, writing for the public and professionals, and program planning, implementation, and evaluation. She has taught university nutrition courses, worked with the provincial network supporting and advocating for dietitians in public health practice, and precepted over 20 dietetics and other students. Dianne earned her BSc in Nutrition and Consumer Studies (now Human Nutrition) at St. Francis Xavier University, and her MSc in Nutrition from the University of Saskatchewan.

    doickle@stfx.ca

Webinar: Partners in advocacy: public health roles and potential partners in advocacy for health equity

“Social advocacy is central to the mission of public health and a significant responsibility for public health professionals.” – Dorfman, Sorenson & Wallack (2009), pg. 15

This webinar will further explore the 4 public health roles in advocacy for health equity as described in the new Let’s Talk: Advocacy and health equity.  Guest presenters will share two examples, one focused on the experience of advocating for a healthy public transit policy, and one exploring where potential opportunities exist for engaging the business sector as advocacy partners.

With our special guests we will explore:

  1. What are the four advocacy roles for public health? How do they apply to each type of social advocacy?
  2. What have we learned from our public health advocacy efforts in the area of healthy public transit policy?
  3. How can public health engage non-traditional partners, including the business sector, in advocacy?

Advisors on tap:

Dr. Patricia Daly, MD, FRCPC

Dr. Daly is the Chief Medical Health Officer and the Vice President, Public Health for Vancouver Coastal Health.  She is also a Clinical Professor in the School of Population and Public Health in the Faculty of Medicine at the University of British Columbia.

As CMHO, her primary mandate is to improve the health of the population served by VCH through population health approaches and public health initiatives.  Working with our partners to create healthy communities is one of the most powerful approaches available to prevent disease and disability and maximize good mental and physical health.  Patty was closely involved in advocating for healthy public transit policy in relation to the recent transit referendum in the lower mainland of BC.

Dr. Mark Lysyshyn, MD, MPH, FRCPC

Dr. Lysyshyn is a Medical Health Officer with Vancouver Coastal Health responsible for the North Shore of Vancouver.  He obtained his medical degree from Queen’s University and a Masters of Public Health from the Harvard School of Public Health.  He completed residency training in Public Health and Preventive Medicine and Internal Medicine at the University of British Columbia.

Coro Strandberg, Principal of Strandberg Consulting 

Ms. Strandberg helps companies become leaders in corporate social responsibility strategies and business models.  A professionally trained social worker with experience as a Social Planner for the City of Surrey and Social Policy Director for the BC Government, for the past 20 years of her career she has been helping businesses embed social sustainability into corporate purpose and business strategies.  Coro gained this experience in the 1980s and 1990s as a Director and then Chair of the Board of Vancity Credit Union, which she helped become a global leader in values-based banking.  She will share her insights on how business can be mobilized as a force for good, going beyond harm reduction to creating social value strategies.  She will explore how business can become a partner in healthy equity.

Facilitators:

Lesley Dyck, MA, Knowledge Translation Specialist, National Collaborating Centre for Determinants of Health (NCCDH)

Sume Ndumbe-Eyoh, MHSc, Knowledge Translation Specialist, National Collaborating Centre for Determinants of Health (NCCDH) 

Who should attend?

Public health practitioners at all levels, and others working for social change, will find new ideas to get from where they are to where they want to be in advocating for healthy public policy in Canada.

Online conversation:

We will also be hosting an online conversation at Health Equity Clicks  during the week of the webinar (June 15-18).  Anyone can join and participate in a discussion of what social advocacy means for them in their public health work.

Click here to register

  • Presenters:
  • Sume Ndumbe-Eyoh
    Sume Ndumbe-Eyoh

    Sume Ndumbe-Eyoh, MHSc

    Senior Knowledge Translation Specialist

    Sume has professional experiences in equity-focused organizational and community development and change, social justice education, HIV/AIDS prevention, research, knowledge translation, evaluation and women's rights with local, provincial and global organizations. Sume has previously contributed to teams at the Program Training and Consultation Centre of the Smoke Free Ontario Strategy, the Regional Diversity Roundtable, Ontario HIV Treatment Network, Southern African AIDS Trust and the Centre for Social Justice. Sume holds a Masters of Health Sciences in Health Promotion and Global Health from the University of Toronto.

    seyoh@stfx.ca

Webinar Equity in Environmental Health Practice: A Role for Public Health Inspectors

Equity in Environmental Health Practice: A Role for Public Health Inspectors 

NCCDH and NCCEH have jointly released Equity in environmental health practice: Findings of a Pilot Study.

This webinar explores how social determinants of health and health equity impact environmental health practice, and considers the role of environmental health public health practitioners in addressing social determinants of health and health equity.

Click here to register

  • Presenters:
  • Dianne Oickle
    Dianne Oickle

    Dianne Oickle, MSc, BSc

    Knowledge Translation Specialist

    Dianne is a dietitian with over 15 years’ experience working in public health in Ontario focused on reproductive and child health in a mostly rural setting with many diverse clients. Part of her work involved development of practice guidelines for health professionals, train-the-trainer initiatives, public presentations, educational resource development, working with the media, community coalition and network support, writing for the public and professionals, and program planning, implementation, and evaluation. She has taught university nutrition courses, worked with the provincial network supporting and advocating for dietitians in public health practice, and precepted over 20 dietetics and other students. Dianne earned her BSc in Nutrition and Consumer Studies (now Human Nutrition) at St. Francis Xavier University, and her MSc in Nutrition from the University of Saskatchewan.

    doickle@stfx.ca

Join us at CPHA 2015 to Public Health 15

Are you attending the Public Health conference in Vancouver? Join us for these NCCDH presentations:

Day 1, Monday, May 25

2:20pm – 3:50pm

World Café: Advocacy for social change: What is public health's role and how do we do it?

Presented by the NCC Determinants of Health

Day 2, Tuesday, May 26

11:00 – 12:30

World Café: Leadership in Health Equity: A Case Study of the Social Determinants of Health (SDOH) Public Health Nurse Initiative.

Day 3, Wednesday, May 27

9:00am – 10:30am

Panel: Three perspectives on integrating equity into reporting: Community, public health and research. Presented by the NCC Determinants of Health.

13:30pm – 15:00pm

Evidence-informed decision-making and health equity: An interactive workshop – Workshop

Day 2 & 3, Tuessday, May 26 and Wednesday, May 27

Poster number 40

Intersectoral action for health equity: Engaging the public to reduce poverty.

A complete list of NCC presentations, workshops, and events at the conference is available online. The NCCDH has also created an Equity Guide for  CPHA 2015.

 

  • Presenters:

The NCCDH at TOPHC (The Ontario Public Health Convention)

Are you attening the Ontario Public Health Convention in Toronto? Join us for these NCCDH presentations on Friday, March 27, 2015:

8:30am – 10:00am

Advocacy in a changing world: The critical role of public health advocacy on the social determinants of health and health equity. (Room 202)

Communicating for change: Improving public and decision-maker awareness of the social determinants of health and equity. (Room 206B)

10:45am – 12:00pm

Speaking clearly: Language as a changing technology to help advance work on the social determinants of health and equity. (Room 203B)

We will be tweeting throughout the conference using the hashtags #healthequity and #sdoh. Follow us on Twitter @NCCDH_CCNDS!

You can also connect in person with Pemma Muzumdar, Communications Coordinator, at the NCCPH booth, and hear news from all six NCCs.

  • Presenters:
  • Sume Ndumbe-Eyoh
    Sume Ndumbe-Eyoh

    Sume Ndumbe-Eyoh, MHSc

    Senior Knowledge Translation Specialist

    Sume has professional experiences in equity-focused organizational and community development and change, social justice education, HIV/AIDS prevention, research, knowledge translation, evaluation and women's rights with local, provincial and global organizations. Sume has previously contributed to teams at the Program Training and Consultation Centre of the Smoke Free Ontario Strategy, the Regional Diversity Roundtable, Ontario HIV Treatment Network, Southern African AIDS Trust and the Centre for Social Justice. Sume holds a Masters of Health Sciences in Health Promotion and Global Health from the University of Toronto.

    seyoh@stfx.ca
  • Pemma Muzumdar
    Pemma Muzumdar

    Pemma Muzumdar, MPH

    Knowledge Translation Specialist

    Pemma Muzumdar is motivated by a desire to improve well-being and planetary health, particularly those who, through intersecting factors, experience marginalization and exclusion. She is based out of Montreal, Quebec.

    Pemma has worked with the six National Collaborating Centres (NCCs) for Public Health in various capacities since 2011, developing and sharing knowledge, networks and resources for improved public health action. She completed her Masters of Public Health at the University of Waterloo in 2010, and draws from significant experience in science communication, public speaking, group facilitation, team learning and organizational development. Prior to joining the NCCs, Pemma contributed to dynamic teams at the Ontario Science Centre, Discovery Channel Canada, the Program Training and Consultation Centre of the Smoke Free Ontario Strategy, TakingITGlobal and the Li Ka Shing Knowledge Institute at St. Michael’s Hospital.

    pmuzumd@stfx.ca

3rd Annual Social Determinants of Public Health Nurse Network Conference

Organized by the Social Determinant of Health Public Health Nurse Network with support from the National Collaborating Centre for Determinants of Health

This workshop will provide an opportunity to explore public health capacity to address the social determinants of health and health equity. It will provide tools and strategies for working effectively on the social determinants of health. There will also be an opportunity to continue to build on the relationships between practitioners from health units across Ontario.

The full day workshop will include presentations, story sharing and interactive sessions on strategies to address the SDH and health equity in public health organizations.

Who should attend:

The workshop is open to all public health practitioners in Ontario working on the social determinants of health and health equity e.g.

  • SDOH Public Health nurses
  • Public health practitioners with responsibility for developing and implementing interventions to address the SDOH and improve health equity

Speakers:

  • Dr. Benita Cohen, Associate Professor, Faculty of Nursing, University of Manitoba
  • Carol Timmings, ‎Director, Healthy Living and Chief Nursing Officer at Toronto Public Health
  • Sume Ndumbe-Eyoh, Knowledge Translation Specialist, National Collaborating Centre for Determinants of Health 
  • SDH PHNs

Planning Team:

  • Claire Hanlon, Network co-Chair, Peterborough County-City Health Unit
  • Renee Boi-Doku, Network co-Chair, Toronto Public Health 
  • Kristina Nairn Haliburton, Kawartha, pine Ridge District Health Unit 
  • Marilyn King Huron County Health Unit
  • Karen Graham, North Bay Parry Sound Health Unit
  • Kiran Somjee, York Region Health Unit
  • Sume Ndumbe-Eyoh, National Collaborating Centre for Determinants of Health 

 

Registration: $50 (breakfast and lunch provided) Registration can be completed here

Registration closes Monday March 16th.

Resources in our Library:

Communicating for change: improving public and decision-maker awareness on health equity

Public awareness and support for the social determinants of health (SDH) can be a key driver for policy change to improve everyday living conditions and promote more equitable distribution of power and resources for health. Over the past few years there has been a concerted effort in Canada and elsewhere  to develop effective communications tools and resources that will engage Canadians on the concepts of the SDH and health equity. There are a growing number of tools and resources being developed by a range of organizations which reflect the realities of the local context.

This webinar will explore:

  • public perception of the social determinants of health in the Canadian context
  • the relationship between public opinion and policy change and
  • explore principles to improve communications on the social determinants of health.  

The webinar will highlight principles to develop messages that consider the complexity and value-laden characteristics of the concepts. 

Advisors on Tap:

  • Dr. Ketan Shankardass, Assistant Professor, Wilfrid Laurier University & Research Scientist, Centre for Research in Inner City Health
  • Dr. James Talbot, Chief Medical Officer of Health, Alberta Health
  • Sume Ndumbe-Eyoh, Knowledge Translation Specialist, NCCDH

To register for this webinar click here.

Resources in our Library:

The origins and spinoffs of equity-focused influenza prevention at Manitoba Health, Healthy Living and Seniors

Description

In this webinar, we will explore:

1. how staff at Manitoba Health, Healthy Living and Seniors used the knowledge of health inequities gained during the H1N1 pandemic response to improve how they work with vulnerable populations across the province—and in particular Aboriginal populations—in an attempt to minimize inequitable impacts.

and

2. the degree to which the collaborations and learnings from their influenza prevention approach began to help  “mainstream” health equity work more broadly in public health work and the factors which contribute to this.

Manitoba Health, Healthy Living and Seniors’ work to reduce the burden of flu and flu-like illnesses among marginalized residents was a groundbreaking project for the Population Health Equity Unit.  First, it grounded the unit’s work in a tangible project; and second, it built relationships and program connections that have furthered the unit’s work on other fronts.

In January, the National Collaborating Centre for Determinants of Health will publish two stories developed in collaboration with staff from Manitoba Health, Healthy Living and Seniors and the Saskatoon Health Region.  This webinar focuses on Manitoba Health, Healthy Living and Seniors’ story of embedding equity thinking in the planning and delivery of its influenza prevention services.

Our advisors on tap will discuss

  • Issues of data gathering and analysis in designing and evaluating the initiative
  • Experiences of collaborative learning and decision-making with community leaders
  • What it means to build trusting relationships
  • How to talk about an equity approach with partners
  • How to use data, experience and partnerships to influence policy
  • The unexpected, non-influenza-related advances in health equity work that this initiative has spawned

Advisors on tap

Dr. Elise Weiss, Deputy Chief Provincial Public Health Officer, MHHLS,

Dr. Marcia Anderson DeCoteau, Medical Officer of Health, Aboriginal Health and Wellness Programs, Winnipeg Regional Health Authority

Karen Serwonka, Senior Policy Analyst, MHHLS

To register for this Webinar click here.

“Recognizing determinants of health and health equity” award

The annual Student Research Day held each March is a university-wide forum showcasing student research and advanced studies at StFX.

 

Criteria for NCCDH “Recognizing determinants of health and health equity” award

Background


The National Collaborating Centre for Determinants of Health (NCCDH) is hosted by St. Francis Xavier University and focuses on the social and economic factors that influence the health of Canadians. The Centre translates and shares information and evidence with public health organizations and practitioners to influence interrelated determinants and advance health equity through public health practice.


To advance social determinants of health and health equity through public health practice and policy, the NCCDH works to:

  • translate and share knowledge and evidence to influence interrelated determinants
  • support the uptake and exchange of information, products and services
  • identify gaps in research and practice
  • engage in collaborative learning projects and support translation of applied research
  • support inter-personal  and inter-organizational connections that enable strong relationships


To achieve these goals, NCCDH projects relates to six key roles for public health to improve health equity.  

  1. Assess and report
  2. Participate in policy development and advocacy
  3. Partner with other sectors
  4. Modify and orient interventions
  5. Leadership and capacity
  6. Communicate

“Recognizing determinants of health and health equity” award


The NCCDH is offering several awards for the 2015 St. Francis Xavier Student Research Day.  Criteria for a research project to be considered for this award include that the project will:

  • Relate to the social determinants of health and/or health equity
  • Refer to health as a broader concept beyond just the absence of disease
  • Demonstrate a link between the social determinants of health and the patterns of health of populations
  • Not focus solely on individual behaviour change as the solution to improve health
  • Include consideration of public health approaches to health (along with or in place of primary healthcare)
  • Comment on the sharing of knowledge to improve conditions for health
  • Discuss different sectors of society working together to improve health


The NCCDH has three awards available to participants in the St. FX Student Research Day 2015.  The award given will depend on the number of criteria listed above that are met.


Gold level – 1 x $100 available 4 or more criteria met

Silver – 2 x $50 available  1-3 criteria met


A staff person from the NCCDH will attend Student Research Day to review projects that have submitted to be adjudicated.  For more information on the NCCDH and the concepts in the criteria listed above, please visit the NCCDH website at www.nccdh.ca.

What does “fair” mean to you? The importance of language for taking action to increase health equity

Health equity language is value laden and full of “shortcut” terminology. Many of our terms—such as “health equity”, “social determinants of health” and “social justice”, are often only meaningful to public health insiders --- and sometimes not even to them!

This webinar continues the discussion about how language can help and hinder our work in the area of social determinants of health and health equity.

The NCCDH has just released a “Glossary of essential health equity terms” in response to practitioner requests for clear definitions that would help us communicate among ourselves and with people outside public health. We’ve discovered that finding opportunities to discuss the meaning of the words we use, such as “closing the gap”, “marginalized populations”, “advantage and disadvantage”, has helped us articulate common values and think more deeply about the equity strategies we use in public health work.

In this Fireside Chat we will explore the meaning of the terms we commonly use in our emails, workshops and reports, and we will discuss how we communicate these ideas to people who are not so familiar with the links between social inequalities and health inequities.

Join us to

1) Learn more about the ongoing development of the NCCDH French and English glossaries of essential health equity terms (available on our webpage, with space to leave comments)

2) Hear from thought-leaders in our field about their favourite terms, and words they wish would disappear from our conversations about health equity

3) Listen and contribute to the ongoing conversation about how we use these terms in Canada, and how we could get better at using, defining and explaining them.

Advisors on Tap:

• Public Health “thought leaders” (to be determined)

• Karen Fish and Lesley Dyck, NCC for Determinant of Health (NCCDH)

Who should attend?

Public health practitioners at all levels will have an opportunity to reflect on how they use social determinants and health equity language and build their confidence to communicate effectively about these complex concepts.

Recommended reading:

NCCDH (2015). Glossary of Essential Health Equity Terms

To register for this Webinar click here

 

 

  • Presenters:
  • Public Health “thought leaders” , 

Dialogue: multiple actors bringing diverse knowledge to improve health equity

The event objective is to provide a unique opportunity for professionals from different sectors, and diverse knowledge bases (e.g. research, practice, experience, management and decision-making) to discuss social inequities of health. The goal of the forum is for participants to examine ways to work together to improve health equity.

The big question behind this dialogue...

What are the opportunities to reduce social inequities in health if we bring together knowledge from experience, practice, research and decision-making?

The event will be held on February 4th and 5th, 2015, in Québec City and is organized in partnership between the Réseau de recherche en santé des populations du Québec, the National Collaborating Centre for Determinants of Health, and the Institut national de santé publique du Québec.

Program and registration: Dialogue between proponents of diverse knowledge for health equity (French PDF) 

 

*This event will take place in French only.

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